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Kevin Bonham
11-07-2013, 08:30 PM
Pairings have been posted and Igor Bjelobrk as Zonal winner has a nice easy one in Alexander Grischuk.

This one has what I think is the strongest field ever for one of these knockouts. 38 of the 46 players rated over 2700 are competing. The only significant omissions are Carlsen and Anand for obvious reasons and Topalov.

peter_parr
15-07-2013, 11:36 AM
The following article was published in the 41st year of my chess column in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 15th July 2013.

Bjelobrk and Grischuk face off in World Cup

Igor Bjelobrk of Sydney representing Oceania meets Alexander Grischuk of Moscow in a first round match of the 128 player World Cup knockout match tournament next month in Tromso, Norway. Matches consist of two classical games and if tied 1-1 are decided by shorter tie-break games.

Bjelobrk (AUS 2341, age 31,seeded 125) became an International Master after winning the Oceania Zonal Championship two months ago in Fiji. Grischuk (RUS 2780, age 29, seeded 4) was champion of Russia in 2009 and world blitz champion in 2006 and 2012. Grischuk in earlier world cup events won many matches in the quicker tie-breaks after tying 1-1. He is ranked world no 5 and is currently in the joint lead and undefeated in the Beijing, China Grand Prix.

Agent Smith
16-07-2013, 08:03 AM
Here's how you do it :) Good luck.

[Event "FIDE GP Beijing"]
[Site "Beijing CHN"]
[Date "2013.07.15"]
[Round "10.4"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Grischuk, Alexander"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2773"]
[BlackElo "2780"]
[ECO "E73"]
[EventDate "2013.07.04"]
[PlyCount "123"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 O-O 6.Bg5 Na6 7.Nf3 h6 8.Be3 e5
9.O-O Ng4 10.Bc1 Nf6 11.Re1 c6 12.Bf1 Bg4 13.d5 c5 14.Be2 Nh7 15.g3 Bd7
16.Bd2 Ng5 17.Qc1 Nxf3+ 18.Bxf3 Kh7 19.Bg2 f5 20.f4 Qf6 21.fxe5 dxe5 22.
Rf1 Rf7 23.a3 Raf8 24.Bh3 Qd6 25.exf5 gxf5 26.Qc2 Qg6 27.Rae1 b6 28.Kh1
Qh5 29.Bg2 Qg6 30.Nd1 Nc7 31.b4 h5 32.Bc3 e4 33.Bxg7 Kxg7 34.bxc5 bxc5 35.
Rf4 Ne8 36.Qf2 Nd6 37.Bf1 Rc8 38.Be2 Rf6 39.Rh4 Qe8 40.Qf4 Rh6 41.Rxh5
Rxh5 42.Bxh5 Qe7
( 42...Qxh5 43.Qxd6 Qf7 44.Rf1 Rf8 45.Qxc5 )
43.g4 Rf8 44.gxf5 Bxf5 45.Rg1+ Kh8 46.Qh6+ Bh7 47.Ne3 Rf6 48.Rg6 Rxg6 49.
Bxg6 Qg7 50.Qxg7+ Kxg7 51.Bxh7 Kxh7 52.Kg2 Kg6 53.Kg3 Kg5 54.h3 Nf7 55.h4+
Kh5 56.Nf5 Ne5 57.d6 Kg6 58.Kf4 Kf6 59.h5 Ke6 60.h6 e3 61.Nxe3 Kxd6 62.Kf5
( 62.Kf5 Nf7 63.h7 Ke7 64.Nd5+ Kf8 65.Kf6 a5 66.Nc7 Nh8 67.Ne6+ Ke8
68.Nxc5 Nf7 69.Ne6 Nh8 70.c5 Kd7 71.Kg7 Kxe6 72.Kxh8 Kd5 73.Kg7 Kxc5
74.h8=Q )
1-0

Altecman
10-08-2013, 01:33 AM
Taken from Chessbase.

The particpants

The FIDE World Cup is a knockout, starting with 128 players. The participants have qualified to play based on the following criteria: the World Champion (Anand), the Women's World Champion (Ushenina, Hou Yifan), the World Junior U-20 Champions 2011 & 2012 (Swiercz, Ipatov), the four 2011 World Cup semi-finalists (Svidler, Grischuk, Ivanchuk, Ponomariov), 18 players according to ratings, 92 players from Continental Championships, six FIDE President nominees and four organiser nominees. The winner and the runner-up of the World Cup 2013 will qualify for the Candidates Tournament of the next World Championship cycle.

If you look at the FIDE rating list you will find that four players from the top are missing: local hero Magnus Carlsen, World Champion Viswanathan Anand, Bulgarian GM Veselin Topalov and Ding Liren of China. Levon Aronian and Vladimir Kramnik are playing, because they are trying to qualify for the 2014 Candidates Tournament and did not play in the FIDE Grand Prix.
a) 2011 World Cup semi-finalists
01. P. Svidler (RUS)
02. A. Grischuk (RUS)
03. V. Ivanchuk (UKR)
04. R. Ponomariov (UKR)

b) 2012 Women's World Champion
05. A. Ushenina (UKR)

c) 2011 and 2012 Junior World Champions
06. D. Swiercz (POL)
07. A. Ipatov (TUR)

d) 18 players based on
their average FIDE rating
08. L. Aronian (ARM) 2816.22
09. V. Kramnik (RUS) 2798.88
10. T. Radjabov (AZE) 2789.22
11. S. Karjakin (RUS) 2777.44
12. F. Caruana (ITA) 2775.44
13. H. Nakamura (USA) 2772.77
14. A. Morozevich (RUS) 2760.44
15. G. Kamsky (USA) 2748.55
16. S. Mamedyarov (AZE) 2744.88
17. Wang Hao (CHN) 2739.11
18. B. Gelfand (ISR) 2738.44
19. P. Leko (HUN) 2731.11
20. E. Tomashevsky (RUS) 2728.77
21. L. Dominguez (CUB) 2727.44
22. M. Adams (ENG) 2721.66
23. R. Wojtaszek (POL) 2721.55
24. A. Giri (NED) 2715.33
25. I. Nepomniachtchi (RUS) 2709.00
26. A. Shirov (LAT) 2708.33

e) 46 players from the European Championships
27. D. Jakovenko (RUS) 2012
28. L. Fressinet (FRA) 2012
29. V. Malakhov (RUS) 2012
30. D. Andreikin (RUS) 2012
31. E. Inarkiev (RUS) 2012
32. M. Matlakov (RUS) 2012
33. V. Bologan (MDA) 2012
34. F. Vallejo Pons (ESP) 2012
35. Y. Kryvoruchko (UKR) 2012
36. S. Azarov (BLR) 2012
37. E. Najer (RUS) 2012
38. V. Akopian (ARM) 2012
39. A. Volokitin (UKR) 2012
40. J. Smeets (NED) 2012
41. C.B. Gawain Jones (ENG) 2012
42. N. Vitiugov (RUS) 2012
43. E. Bacrot (FRA) 2012
44. A. Dreev (RUS) 2012
45. D. Khismatullin (RUS) 2012
46. M. Kobalia (RUS) 2012
47. V. Durarbeyli (AZE) 2012
48. A. Riazantsev (RUS) 2012
49. B. Jobava (GEO) 2012
50. A. Moiseenko (UKR) 2013
51. E. Alekseev (RUS) 2013
52. E. Romanov (RUS) 2013
53. A. Beliavsky (SLO) 2013
54. C. Lupulescu (ROU) 2013
55. S. Movsesian (ARM) 2013
56. H. Melkumyan (ARM) 2013
57. A. Korobov (UKR) 2013
58. I. Lysyj (RUS) 2013
59. A. Shimanov (RUS) 2013
60. A. Areshchenko (UKR) 2013
61. P. Eljanov (UKR) 2013
62. M. Kravtsiv (UKR) 2013
63. D. Dubov (RUS) 2013
64. M. Ragger (AUT) 2013
65. Z. Hracek (CZE) 2013


66. I. Popov (RUS) 2013
67. S. Brunello (ITA) 2013
68. S. A. Fedorchuk (UKR) 2013
69. E. Postny (ISR) 2013
70. V. Zvjaginsev (RUS) 2013
71. A. Istratescu (FRA) 2013
72. E. Safarli (AZE) 2013

f) 20 players from the Americas
73. G. Kaidanov (USA) Continental 2012
74. J. Granda Zuniga (PER) Continental 2012
75. A. Shabalov (USA) Continental 2012
76. E. Hansen (CAN) Continental 2012
77. A. Ramirez (USA) Zonal 2.1
78. A. Onischuk (USA) Zonal 2.1
79. C. Holt (USA) Zonal 2.1
80. L. M. Christiansen (USA) Zonal 2.1
81. R. Robson (USA) Zonal 2.1
82. I. R. Ortiz Suarez (CUB) Continental 2013
83. D. Flores (ARG) Continental 2013
84. J. Cori (PER) Continental 2013
85. D. Cori T. (PER) Continental 2013
86. R. Felgaer (ARG) Zonal 2.5
87. S. Mareco (ARG) Zonal 2.5
88. R. Leitao (BRA) Zonal 2.4
89. A. Fier (BRA) Zonal 2.4
90. B. Sambuev (CAN) Zonal 2.2
91. L. Bruzon (CUB) (Zonal 2.3)
92. E. Iturrizaga (VEN) (Zonal 2.3)

g) 20 players from Asia/Oceania
93. Negi Parimarjan (IND) Continental 2012
94. Yu Yangyi (CHN) Continental 2012
95. Salem A. R. Saleh (UAE) Continental 2012
96. Liu Qingnan (CHN) Continental 2012
97. Oliver Barbosa (PHI) Continental 2012
98. Nguyen Ngoc Trung Son (VIE) Zonal 3.3
99. Wesley So (PHI) Zonal 3.3
100. G. Akash (IND) Zonal 3.7
101. Z. Rahman (BAN) Zonal 3.2
102. Lou Yiping (CHN) Zonal 3.5
103. Wan Yunguo (CHN) Zonal 3.5
104. Li Chao B (CHN) Continental 2013
105. M. Paragua (PHI) Continental 2013
106. Le Quang Liem (VIE) Continental 2013
107. B. Adhiban (IND) Continental 2013
108. K. Sasikiran (IND) Continental 2013
109. I. Bjelobrk (AUS) Zonal 3.6
110. Darini Pouria (IRI) Zonal 3.1
111. A. Filippov (UZB) Zonal 3.4
112. M. Markov (KGZ) Zonal 3.4

h) 6 players from Africa
113. Amin Bassem (EGY) Continental 2013
114. A. Adly (EGY) Continental 2013
115. E. El Gindy (EGY) Continental 2013
116. Ali Sebbar (MAR) Zonal 4.1
117. S. Shoker (EGY) Zonal 4.2
118. Gillian Bwalya (ZAM) Zonal 4.3

i) 6 nominees of the FIDE President
119. M. Vachier-Lagrave (FRA)
120. Hou Yifan (CHN)
121. J. Polgar (HUN)
122. D. Navara (CZE)
123. J-K. Duda (POL)
124. Wei Yi (CHN)

j) 4 nominees of the local organising committee
125. Jon Ludvig Hammer (NOR)
126. Simen Agdestein (NOR)
127. Leif Erlend Johannessen (NOR)
128. Torbjorn Ringdal Hansen (NOR)

Total = 128 players

Igor Bjebork representing Australia as the winner of the Zonal is up against Russian super GM Alexander Grischuk first round. Good luck to Igor!

Good prize pool for the World Cup, all participants recieve a guaranteed 6,000 US!

Kevin Bonham
10-08-2013, 04:31 PM
Games start 11 pm AEST I think. 29 August is the free day before the final.

Garvinator
12-08-2013, 12:16 AM
When do the games start? I thought they would have started by now. But main website is down.

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 12:22 AM
When do the games start? I thought they would have started by now. But main website is down.

I thought they started at 11. Chessdom down too (probably getting feed from main site).

If even the Norwegians can't get this first night thing right, what hope is there for humanity? :eek:

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 12:25 AM
Bless you TWIC:

http://theweekinchess.com/chessnews/events/fide-world-cup-tromso-2013

Garvinator
12-08-2013, 12:30 AM
Main site now showing games

Ian_Rogers
12-08-2013, 12:54 AM
For commentary try http://new.livestream.com/accounts/1504418/events/2308241

The tournament's main server (in Germany) has crashed and they are trying to get it restored while redirecting people to other sites such as http://worldcup2013.liveschach.net/.

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 01:56 AM
Bjelobrk - Grischuk

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.d4 O-O 6.h3 e5 7.d5 a5 8.Be2 Na6 9.Bg5 Qe8 10.Nd2 Nd7 11.a3 f6 12.Bh4 Nb6 13.b3 Bd7 14.Rb1 Nc5 15.Qc2 f5 16.b4 axb4 17.axb4 Nxe4 18.Ndxe4 fxe4 19.Bg5 e3 20.Bxe3 Bf5 21.Ne4 Qa4 22.Qd3 Qa2 23.Bxb6 Ra3 24.Be3 Rxd3 25.Bxd3 Bxe4 26.Bxe4 Bh6 27.O-O Bxe3 28.fxe3 Rxf1+ 0-1

Top board's interesting - Aronian's untitled opponent may be close enough to a draw with black if he is good enough to hold it. [edit: nope, the underdog stumbled eventually!]

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 03:05 AM
Pretty devastating stuff by Grischuk there. On the Round 1 Part 1 replay, presently at http://new.livestream.com/accounts/1504418/events/2308241 Igor appears at c. 2 hrs 50 and talks through the game. It is really 19.Bg5? e3! where the wheels start flying off in all directions.

antichrist
12-08-2013, 08:12 AM
In Asia Oceania category there are three reps from Philippines but only one from OZ?

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 11:56 AM
In Asia Oceania category there are three reps from Philippines but only one from OZ?

PHI is not in Oceania zone.

Bill Gletsos
12-08-2013, 12:04 PM
In Asia Oceania category there are three reps from Philippines but only one from OZ?Only one (So) qualified from the zone 3.3 (the zone that includes the Philippines).
The other two (Barbosa and Paragua) qualified by virtue of their placings in the 2012 & 2013 Asian Continental Championships.

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 12:27 PM
Kamsky, Wang Hao, Adams the highest seeds to draw with black.

Ivanchuk, Andreikin, Alekseev the highest to draw with white.

There were quite a few losses by the higher-seeded player on the lower boards where both players are 2600+ and so the upset margin is not great.

Kevin Bonham
12-08-2013, 11:06 PM
Oh, Morozevich lost yesterday and I somehow failed to notice that when going through the results.

Kevin Bonham
13-08-2013, 01:30 AM
Whoops!

Ushenina, Anna - Svidler, Peter
FIDE World Cup 2013 Tromso NOR (2.13), 2013.08.12

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Nf3 c5 8.Rb1 O-O 9.Be2 cxd4 10.cxd4 Qa5+ 11.Bd2 Qxa2 12.O-O Bg4 13.Bg5 h6 14.Be3 Nc6 15.d5 Na5 16.Re1 Bxf3 17.Bxf3 Nc4 18.Bf4 e5 19.dxe6 fxe6 20.Rxb7 Rad8 21.Rd7 Rxd7 22.Qxd7 Ne5 23.Bxe5 Bxe5 24.Rf1 h5 25.Be2 Rf7 26.Qc8+ Rf8 27.Qc6 Bd4 28.Bc4 Rxf2?? 29.Qxe6+ Kh7 30.Qd7+ 1-0

Those two are square and off to playoffs tomorrow.

Kevin Bonham
13-08-2013, 04:03 AM
Grischuk - Bjelobrk. Much better fight with black but in the end Grischuk won again.

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4 5.h3 Bh5 6.c4 e6 7.d3 Nbd7 8.cxd5 cxd5 9.Nc3 Be7 10.e4 d4 11.Ne2 Bxf3 12.Bxf3 e5 13.Bg2 0-0 14.f4 Rc8 15.Kh1 Qb6 16.Ng1 Bd6 17.f5 Nc5 18.g4 Qa6 19.g5 Nfd7 20.Rf3 Rc7 21.h4 Rfc8 22.Ne2 Qb5 23.f6 g6 24.h5 Nf8 25.hxg6 fxg6 26.Bh3 Nfe6 27.Rb1 a5 28.Bd2 Kf7 29.b4 axb4 30.Rxb4 Qa6 31.Qb1 Rc6 32.Bg4 R8c7 33.a4 Nf8 34.Ng1 Nce6 35.Rb2 Qxa4 36.Rf1 Rc2 37.Nf3 Rxb2 38.Qxb2 Qc2 39.Qxc2 Rxc2 40.Rb1 Nc5 41.Bb4 Nfe6 42.Kg1 Bc7 43.Ne1 Ra2 44.Rc1 Na6 45.Nf3 Nxb4 46.Bxe6+ Kxe6 47.Rxc7 Nxd3 48.Re7+ Kd6 49.Re8 Ra1+ 50.Kh2 Ra2+ 51.Kg3 Nc5 52.f7 Nd7 53.Rd8 Ke6 54.Rxd7 Ra8 55.Rxb7 0-1

Garvinator
13-08-2013, 09:03 AM
Oh, Morozevich lost yesterday and I somehow failed to notice that when going through the results.
I did not miss it ;)

Kevin Bonham
14-08-2013, 02:23 AM
Uh-oh; an incident. Jorge Cori forfeits on time against Radjabov in the first game of second stage of playoffs. Wonder what that's all about.

Kevin Bonham
14-08-2013, 03:52 AM
Cori has appealed the forfeit.

Kevin Bonham
14-08-2013, 03:53 AM
Apart from the Radjabov situation the big guns have generally gone through. Nepomniatchi was the biggest scalp yesterday.

Jesper Norgaard
14-08-2013, 11:19 AM
Cori has appealed the forfeit.

He allegedly heard from the arbiter that the next round was 18.50 ("fifty") instead of 18.15 ("fifteen"). Being a Latin with little English knowledge, Jorge Cori could have a weak point with his appeal. But I hear there is a big display of the next round schedule, and a warning over the loudspeaker 5 minutes before.

With Nihat on the appeals committee it was obvious it would be rejected, as it was. But who likes the zero-tolerance rules? Coming 2 minutes late to a Blitz game is like virtual suicide anyhow.

Kevin Bonham
14-08-2013, 12:34 PM
He allegedly heard from the arbiter that the next round was 18.50 ("fifty") instead of 18.15 ("fifteen").

Oh dear. Had a funny incident once when as I was leaving a venue someone asked me the time and I said 9:50 (pm). My opponent was listening and thought I was saying the time for the next round (which was actually 9:00 am) and turned up 50 minutes late. He wasn't forfeited as at that stage the cutoff was an hour. Actually as he had only 40 mins to my 90 (guillotine) I decided to let him off scoring.

Garvinator
14-08-2013, 12:34 PM
Cori has appealed the forfeit.
Official decision: http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/breaking-news-cori-appeal-denied.html

Ian_Rogers
14-08-2013, 07:38 PM
He allegedly heard from the arbiter that the next round was 18.50 ("fifty") instead of 18.15 ("fifteen"). Being a Latin with little English knowledge, Jorge Cori could have a weak point with his appeal. But I hear there is a big display of the next round schedule, and a warning over the loudspeaker 5 minutes before.

With Nihat on the appeals committee it was obvious it would be rejected, as it was. But who likes the zero-tolerance rules? Coming 2 minutes late to a Blitz game is like virtual suicide anyhow.

There is no display of the next round schedule and the 5 minute warning is only in the playing hall. The games are also not on a fixed schedule - there was a 25 minute break between two of the blitz games yesterday when 10 minutes after the last game had originally been announced.

The problem for Cori was that he heard 18.50, asked an arbiter "Is it 18.50?" and the arbiter, expecting and therefore hearing 18.15, said yes.

Given the make-up of the Appeals Committtee, with FIDE officials rather than players or seconds, the appeal was always going to go down. In fact one Appeala Committee member dismissed the appeal "easily" because he decided that Cori had perfectly good English and had just made up a weak excuse for being late. The others were more sympathetic but deemed that, in the absence of evidence that he was positively misled by an arbiter, it was ulitmately Cori's repsonsibility to turn up on time.

Kevin Bonham
14-08-2013, 08:00 PM
Hmmm. Based on Ian's summary it sounds like Cori was hard done-by.

Whatever the rights and wrongs it was a shame; ruined a good match.

Ian_Rogers
14-08-2013, 09:31 PM
Hmmm. Based on Ian's summary it sounds like Cori was hard done-by.

Hard to say - it was a borderline appeal which normally could have gone either way. What was definitely unfair was that Cori (or actually his sponsor Susan Polgar) was not refunded the $500(!) appeal cost despite the appeal being non-frivolous.

Adamski
14-08-2013, 11:23 PM
Whoops!

Ushenina, Anna - Svidler, Peter
FIDE World Cup 2013 Tromso NOR (2.13), 2013.08.12

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Nf3 c5 8.Rb1 O-O 9.Be2 cxd4 10.cxd4 Qa5+ 11.Bd2 Qxa2 12.O-O Bg4 13.Bg5 h6 14.Be3 Nc6 15.d5 Na5 16.Re1 Bxf3 17.Bxf3 Nc4 18.Bf4 e5 19.dxe6 fxe6 20.Rxb7 Rad8 21.Rd7 Rxd7 22.Qxd7 Ne5 23.Bxe5 Bxe5 24.Rf1 h5 25.Be2 Rf7 26.Qc8+ Rf8 27.Qc6 Bd4 28.Bc4 Rxf2?? 29.Qxe6+ Kh7 30.Qd7+ 1-0

Those two are square and off to playoffs tomorrow.Great result for the women's WC.

Adamski
14-08-2013, 11:47 PM
I empathise with Cori. Horrible way to lose such an important game.

Kevin Bonham
15-08-2013, 12:19 AM
Great result for the women's WC.

She's been eliminated now. Last night she missed a win against him that would have squared their playoff.

Kevin Bonham
15-08-2013, 02:26 PM
Not really any big upsets in round 2 game 1 overnight. 19/32 drawn, the highest-seeded whites to draw being Wang Hao and Adams. Leko lost with black to Granda Zuniga, which was the only loss for the top half. On the top 10 boards the higher seeded players with white won and the higher seeded players with black drew.

Jesper Norgaard
15-08-2013, 04:40 PM
There is no display of the next round schedule and the 5 minute warning is only in the playing hall. The games are also not on a fixed schedule - there was a 25 minute break between two of the blitz games yesterday when 10 minutes after the last game had originally been announced.

The problem for Cori was that he heard 18.50, asked an arbiter "Is it 18.50?" and the arbiter, expecting and therefore hearing 18.15, said yes.

Given the make-up of the Appeals Committtee, with FIDE officials rather than players or seconds, the appeal was always going to go down. In fact one Appeal Committee member dismissed the appeal "easily" because he decided that Cori had perfectly good English and had just made up a weak excuse for being late. The others were more sympathetic but deemed that, in the absence of evidence that he was positively misled by an arbiter, it was ulitmately Cori's repsonsibility to turn up on time.
In my opinion the lack of display is the real elephant in the room, not whether Cori could be excused for misunderstanding the verbal message. The players' meeting clearly stated that there would be a BIG DISPLAY, that YOU CAN'T MISS about when was the next round and how much time is left until it happens, with an extra countdown 5 minutes before, so I think they are not living up to their own declarations in the arbiter group. Giving this kind of information verbally is just a lame idea, period. What is more troubling is that after this fiasco with Cori, they seemingly haven't any plans to change the policy, or said more precisely, to adhere to the policy they already published in the players' meeting.

A good chief arbiter would have given a dispensation for this mistake by Cori (even though it would be inconvenient for Radjabov to have to play the first Blitz game, having drawn the second to try to qualify), and immediately enforced that the next round is always published on the display as promised. This is not rocket science, you know. It is just living up to the promises, and recognizing the fault of the arbiters/organizers when it is due, and act in good faith to have the best environment possible for the players.

On top of that they refused to return the deposit fee of 500 US$ for the rejected protest, although the rules say "If the protest is rejected, the fee may be forfeited to FIDE" in other words they could return the fee if the protest was deemed not to be in bad faith. Despicable.

Unfortunately in FIDE there are not many incentives to admit own mistakes. It is a monopoly, and one that cannot be knocked down because of "African votes" etc. (e.g. member countries that have approximately 1000 times less registered players than the bigger countries). It is an undemocratic quagmire of bureaucracy.

In the Cori-Radjabov match, where Radjabov played for a draw in the second Blitz game to win the match, it would be better to replay both games, to give both an equal opportunity to readjust to the result of the first Blitz game. It would have delayed the schedule for these two players, but it would be a minor issue. Zero tolerance is zero intelligence IMHO.

Ian_Rogers
16-08-2013, 12:18 AM
Late last night FIDE agreed to return the $500 to Susan Polgar.

Kevin Bonham
16-08-2013, 03:11 AM
Leko out to Granda Zuniga.

Gelfand, Dominguez, Grischuk, Caruana, Nakamura through

Mamedyarov to playoff
Karjakin to playoff

Kramnik and Aronian still playing

Kamsky game has been totally crazy with missed wins and blunders everywhere; he's currently losing but won yesterday so will at least get another shot.

Kevin Bonham
16-08-2013, 03:26 AM
Shirov is out, beaten nicely by 14-year old Wei Yi (2557). Watch this one; Wang Hao reckons he is 2700ish already!

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 7. Be2 Qc7 8.
Qd2 b5 9. f3 Nbd7 10. a3 h5 11. O-O-O Rb8 12. Bxb5 axb5 13. Ndxb5 Qb7 14.
Qxd6 Bxd6 15. Nxd6+ Ke7 16. Nxb7 Bxb7 17. Rd4 Rhd8 18. Rhd1 Ne5 19. a4 Rxd4
20. Bxd4 Nfd7 21. b3 g5 22. Nb5 g4 23. Bb2 gxf3 24. Ba3+ Kf6 25. gxf3 Kg5
26. Nd4 Ba6 27. Kb1 Rb7 28. Rg1+ Kf6 29. Bb2 Ke7 30. Rg5 h4 31. f4 Ng6 32.
Nxe6 fxe6 33. Rxg6 Nc5 34. f5 Kf7 35. Rf6+ Ke7 36. Rh6 Kf7 37. Rxh4 exf5
38. exf5 Rd7 39. Bd4 Rd5 40. Rf4 Bc8 41. Bxc5 Rxc5 42. Kb2 Kf6 43. b4 Rc7
44. Kb3 Bxf5 45. c3 Rh7 46. b5 Ke5 47. Rd4 Rxh2 48. a5 Bh3 49. a6 Bf1 50.
a7 Rh8 51. Kb4 Bg2 52. Rd2 Bf3 53. Ka5 Rc8 54. Rd3 Bg2 55. Ka6 Rf8 56. Rd2
Ba8 57. c4 Rc8 58. c5 1-0

Kevin Bonham
16-08-2013, 03:37 AM
Aronian and Kamsky will also be in playoffs tomorrow, as probably will Kramnik (still playing but game level.)

Jesper Norgaard
16-08-2013, 05:25 AM
Late last night FIDE agreed to return the $500 to Susan Polgar.
At last a glimpse of decency. Will the display of each tiebreak round be up for round 2 tiebreaks?

Thanks for the heads-up, Ian. I understand you are assisting together with your wife Cathy?

Ian_Rogers
16-08-2013, 06:31 AM
I don't know if there will be written as well as verbal announcements for the tiebreakers tomorrow; certainly that would be logical.

Cathy and I are just covering the World Cup for various journals but Cathy was called up as an arbiter for the first round tiebreakers. We leave Tromso tomorrow.

braindied
16-08-2013, 11:22 AM
Hard to say - it was a borderline appeal which normally could have gone either way. What was definitely unfair was that Cori (or actually his sponsor Susan Polgar) was not refunded the $500(!) appeal cost despite the appeal being non-frivolous.

I understand the appeal fee was eventually waived ( or returned )... can you confirm?

Thanks

braindied
16-08-2013, 11:39 AM
I see on a GM's facebook page the following nasty post:

"I compared today the game of surprise win of Chinese kid ( 14 years old ) against Alexei Shirov, from some moves upwards the kid played all the first line houddini ( 10 moves in a row ). Very suspect, from opening it was nothing special three pawns for a piece but then some subtle moves like Kb1 in order to give a check with the bishop on c1, I mean this just reminded me on Coris play against me in Benasque during the final stage of the game ( endgame ). Very suspicious indeed."

It obviously does not pay to be a good player, as too few blunders in your play means you must be cheating? What rubbish!

I still wonder whether organisers should add 10-15 min delays on live feeds?

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 01:09 AM
I understand the appeal fee was eventually waived ( or returned )... can you confirm?

He has confirmed - see post 35.

That is a nasty post by the GM, whoever it is. Targeting juniors because they manage to play several best moves in a row (even assuming that it's true) is just awful.

Anyone got a working feed for live broadcast? Keeps stopping for me.

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 01:25 AM
Back now.

Aronian through
Hometown hero Hammer beats Navara 2-0.

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 01:33 AM
Top ten all through now - Kramnik, Karjakin, Mamedyarov, Kamsky all through in the first 2-game rapid match.

But Wang Hao out, eliminated by Dreev.

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 01:43 AM
Adams eliminated by Yuriy Kryvoruchko.

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 04:33 AM
Ponomariov has a great record in these things but he agreed early draws in the last pair of blitz games with 17-year old Daniil Dubov.

This then is the Armageddon game with Dubov white:

1.b3 e5 2.Bb2 Nc6 3.e3 Nf6 4.c4 g6 5.Nf3 d6 6.d3 Bg7 7.Nbd2 O-O 8.Be2 Re8 9.a3 Ne7 10.b4 b6 11.O-O Bb7 12.Rc1 c5 13.Qc2 Qc7 14.Ng5 h6 15.Nge4 Nxe4 16.Nxe4 Bxe4 17.dxe4 Nc6 18.Bc3 cxb4 19.axb4 a5 20.b5 Nd8 21.Rfd1 Ne6 22.Rd5 Nc5 23.Rcd1 Bf8 24.Bb2 h5 25.f4 exf4 26.Qc3 f6 27.Qxf6 Qg7 28.Rxd6 Qxf6 29.Rxf6 Re6 30.e5 Rxf6 31.exf6 fxe3 32.Bf3 Re8 33.Kf1 Kf7 34.Ke2 a4 35.Bc6 Rc8 36.Bd5+ Ke8 37.Kxe3 Bh6+ 38.Kf3 Kf8 39.Be5 Rd8 40.Bc7 Rd7 41.Bxb6 Nb3 42.Rd3 Bg5 43.f7 Be7 44.Re3 Rd6 45.Bc7 Rd7 46.Bf4 Kg7 47.Rxe7 Nd4+ 48.Kf2 1-0

Great game to watch, Dubov had 13 seconds remaining when Pono resigned (but would have got the increment at move 61). Ponomariov out.

Desmond
17-08-2013, 09:08 AM
then some subtle moves like Kb1 in order to give a check with the bishop on c1,Oh is that why - I was trying to work out the reason for that move.

Ian Rout
17-08-2013, 09:28 AM
That is a nasty post by the GM, whoever it is. Targeting juniors because they manage to play several best moves in a row (even assuming that it's true) is just awful.
Is the GM in fact a GM or just someone who puts "GM" on the front of an account name, or uses the name of a real GM?

It seems like a silly comment given that if he's really a GM he would know that matching Houdini ten moves in a row is nothing special and anyone with too much spare time could find plenty of cases in his own games. In any case his comment presumably refers to moves c. 20-30 of which some could well have been prepared in advance with a computer even if they are Houdini moves.

Moreover the moves don't look especially earth-shattering and beyond human capability. A piece moving aside to create room for another piece, as with 27.Kb1, is not an uncommon device. Moreover the moves are not all clearly Houdini's first choice on my computer. Most of them are eventually first among near-equals after a period of bobbing about but on move 29 it prefers f4 by about 0.2 and on move 30 it prefers Ba3+ by about 0.3 and rates the move played only equal third. (Of course these might be changed by using a different computer and waiting time.)

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 12:23 PM
Tonight (not necessarily correct colours)

Aronian (1)-Tomashevsky (32)
Morozevich (16)-Vitiugov (17)
Kamsky (8) - Hammer (89)
Mamedyarov (9) - Wei Yi (105)
Grischuk (4) - Le Quang Liem (29)
Svidler (13) - Radjabov (20)
Karjakin (5) - Eljanov (37)
Dreev (53) - Andreikin (21)
Caruana (2) - Malakhov (31)
Granda Zuniga (50) - Giri (18)
Gelfand (7) - Moiseenko (39)
Dominguez (10) - Vachier-Lagrave (23)
Kramnik (3) - Areschenko (30)
Kryvoruchko (51) - Ivanchuk (19)
Nakamura (6) - Adhiban (102)
Dubov (75) - Korobov (22)

Adamski
17-08-2013, 03:23 PM
Adams eliminated by Yuriy Kryvoruchko.
Eek! Who? Sad.

braindied
17-08-2013, 04:48 PM
Is the GM in fact a GM or just someone who puts "GM" on the front of an account name, or uses the name of a real GM?



It is a real GM, and apparently one known for such stupid nasty suggestions.

It seems that if you make such suggestions often enough the person just becomes a "known slanderer" and therefore FIDE does nothing about it.

Seems wrong to me, as other chess players may know he's like that, but do the general public?

Kevin Bonham
17-08-2013, 11:49 PM
It is a real GM, and apparently one known for such stupid nasty suggestions.

I wouldn't mind knowing who this scumbag is actually. (PM tips welcome!)

Last night's Armageddon video:

AsG0GTDdhfs

Impressed generally with Polgar's commentary in terms of her sight of the board and ability to spot things immediately.

Kevin Bonham
18-08-2013, 01:36 AM
Kramnik held to a short draw.

Kevin Bonham
18-08-2013, 02:31 AM
Le Quang Liem beats Grischuk!

Nakamura, Gelfand, Kamsky, Svidler all won.

Aronian a pawn down vs Tomashevsky.

Kevin Bonham
18-08-2013, 06:30 PM
Aronian loses and must beat Tomashevsky with black tonight or is out.

Desmond
18-08-2013, 06:42 PM
Morozovich should have won with Black but only drew


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. e3 Bb7 6. Bd3 Bxc3+
7. bxc3 d6 8. O-O O-O 9. Nd2 e5 10. e4 Nc6 11. Bb2 Re8 12. Re1 Na5
13. Qc2 Ba6 14. Rad1 Qd7 15. Bf1 c5 16. g3 Re7 17. Bc1 h6 18. d5 Nh7
19. f3 Rb8 20. Re3 Qe8 21. Rde1 Nf6 22. Qd1 Qd7 23. h3 Nh5 24. Kh2 Rf8
25. h4 Bc8 26. Qc2 f6 27. Nb3 Nb7 28. Qf2 Qa4 29. Kg1 f5 30. exf5 Bxf5
31. Qh2 Bg6 32. f4 Nf6 33. Qe2 Bh5 34. Qg2 Ng4 35. R3e2 Ref7 36. Rb2 Nd8
37. Bd3 Re7 38. Rbe2 Rfe8 39. Rf1 e4 40. Rxe4 Rxe4 41. Bxe4 Qxc4 42. Bf3 Qxc3
43. Qd2 Qxd2 44. Nxd2 Nf6 45. Bg2 Bf7 46. Nc4 Nb7 47. Ne3 h5 48. Rd1 b5
49. Bf1 c4 50. a4 a6 51. axb5 axb5 52. Bd2 Nc5 53. Nf5 Nce4 54. Bb4 Rd8
55. Bg2 g6 56. Ne7+ Kf8 57. Nc6 Ra8 58. Bxe4 Nxe4 59. Rd4 Nxg3 60. Bxd6+ Ke8
61. Rd1 Ra2 62. Bb4 Ne2+ 63. Kf1 Ng3+ 64. Kg1 Rb2 65. Re1+ Ne2+ 66. Kf1 Bxd5
67. Bc3 Rb1 68. Rxb1 Nxc3 69. Re1+ Kd7 70. Nb4 Kd6 71. Re5 Kc5 72. Na6+ Kd4
73. Ke1 Bc6 74. Nb4 Be4 75. Kd2 Nd5 76. Nc6+ Kc5 77. Rxe4 Kxc6 78. Re6+ Kc5
79. Rxg6 b4 80. f5 b3 81. f6 c3+ 82. Kc1 Nf4 83. Rg1 Kd6 84. Rf1 Nd3+
85. Kd1 c2+ 86. Kd2 c1=Q+ 87. Rxc1 Nxc1 88. Kxc1 Ke6 89. Kb2 Kxf6 90. Kxb3 Kf5
91. Kc2 Kg4 92. Kd2 Kxh4 93. Ke2 Kg3 94. Kf1 h4 95. Kg1 h3 96. Kh1 h2
1/2-1/2

Davidflude
18-08-2013, 08:01 PM
I have found the site. I will watch games later. Meanwhile I should look at me correspondence games.

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 12:27 AM
Mamedyarov - Wei Yi to playoffs tomorrow. Watch out Shak! :lol:

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 01:27 AM
Gelfand through.
Kamsky through
Nakamura through as soon as his opponent resigns
Korobov-Dubov, Andreikin-Dreev, Morozevich-Vitiugov, Kryvoruchko-Ivanchuk, Caruana-Malakhov all to playoffs

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 02:24 AM
Svidler draws with Radjabov so Radjabov is out.

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 02:31 AM
Radjabov - Svidler

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.g3 c5 6.Bg2 Nc6 7.h4 h6 8.O-O Bg7 9.Nxd5 Qxd5 10.d3 O-O 11.Be3 Qh5 12.Rc1 b6 13.d4 Rd8 14.Nd2 cxd4 15.Bf4 d3 16.Re1 Nd4 17.Bxa8 Bg4 18.f3 dxe2 19.Qa4 Rxa8 20.fxg4 Qxg4 21.Kg2 Rd8 22.Bc7 Rd7 23.Rc4 Qf5 24.Qxa7 Nc2 25.Rxe2 Ne3+ 26.Kh2 Nxc4 27.Nxc4 Qc5 28.b3 Rxc7 29.Qxb6 Qxb6 30.Nxb6 e6 31.Nc4 Bd4 32.Rc2 e5 33.b4 e4 34.a4 f5 35.a5 Rb7 36.Rd2 e3 37.Rxd4 e2 38.Rd8+ Kf7 39.Nd6+ Kf6 40.Rf8+ -

Svidler's commentary in the post-game interview was very funny, talking about how he came to pick a variation that had him a rook down (albeit with loads of compensation) in a game in which he was aiming for a draw. He was also a bit disgusted with himself for ruining possible winning chances.

Vachier-Lagrave through, Dominguez out.

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 02:44 AM
Aronian is out! Exciting game. White very short on time at stages, but they do have the 30 second increment.

Aronian seemed to have a cold. Alas not the first time he's happened to be unwell in an important event.

Kramnik-Areschenko playoffs tomorrow.

Tomashevsky - Aronian

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 exd5 5.cxd5 Bd6 6.Nc3 O-O 7.g3 Bc7 8.d6 Ba5 9.Bg2 Ne4 10.O-O Nxc3 11.bxc3 Bxc3 12.Bg5 Bf6 13.Qd5 Na6 14.Rac1 Rb8 15.Qf5 b5 16.e4 Bxg5 17.Nxg5 g6 18.Qg4 f6 19.Nxh7 Kxh7 20.f4 Bb7 21.f5 Qe8 22.e5 Bxg2 23.Kxg2 fxe5 24.Rce1 gxf5 25.Rxf5 Rxf5 26.Qxf5+ Qg6 27.Qxd7+ Kg8 28.Rf1 c4 29.h4 c3 30.h5 Qe4+ 31.Kh3 Kh8 32.Qe6 Nc5 33.Qf6+ Kh7 34.Qf7+ Kh8 35.Qf6+ Kh7 36.Qe7+ Kh8 37.Qf6+ -

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 03:20 AM
Granda Zuniga having a brilliant tournament - strikes back and beats Giri with black and off to playoffs.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nf3 Nbd7 4.Nc3 e5 5.e4 Be7 6.Be2 O-O 7.O-O Re8 8.Re1 Bf8 9.Bf1 g6 10.Rb1 a5 11.b3 exd4 12.Nxd4 Nc5 13.f3 c6 14.Bg5 h6 15.Bh4 g5 16.Bf2 Nh5 17.Qd2 Qf6 18.g3 Qg6 19.Bg2 Nf6 20.g4 Nfd7 21.Rbd1 Ne5 22.Qc2 a4 23.b4 Na6 24.Qxa4 Nxc4 25.Qb3 Ne5 26.a3 Nc7 27.Bg3 Qf6 28.Rf1 Be6 29.Nxe6 Qxe6 30.Qxe6 Nxe6 31.a4 Nc4 32.Rc1 Bg7 33.Rfd1 Bd4+ 34.Bf2 Be5 35.Rc2 Na3 36.Rcc1 Bf4 37.Ra1 Nc2 38.Rab1 Be5 39.Rdc1 Ned4 40.Rb2 Na3 41.Ra2 Nc4 42.Kh1 b5 43.h3 Reb8 44.a5 Nb3 45.Rcc2 Nbxa5 46.Nxb5 cxb5 47.bxa5 b4 0-1

Not bad for a 46 year old farmer!

Kevin Bonham
19-08-2013, 10:30 AM
Grischuk makes the playoffs ... the hard way.


1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.c4 c6 4.b3 Bg7 5.Bb2 d5 6.Bg2 O-O 7.O-O Bg4 8.d3 Bxf3 9.Bxf3 e6 10.Qc2 a5 11.e3 Na6 12.a3 Re8 13.Nd2 Nd7 14.d4 Rc8 15.Rac1 Nf6 16.Rfd1 Qe7 17.Bg2 Ra8 18.Nf3 Ne4 19.Ne5 Nd6 20.Qb1 Red8 21.Nd3 Nb8 22.a4 Bf8 23.Bc3 Nd7 24.Be1 Ra7 25.Rc2 Rb8 26.Rdc1 Bg7 27.Ra2 Qd8 28.Qc2 Rba8 29.Qe2 Rb8 30.Rac2 Qe7 31.Rb1 Qd8 32.Rd1 Qe7 33.Kh1 Rc8 34.Rb1 Rca8 35.Nf4 Qd8 36.Bh3 Qe7 37.Kg1 Rb8 38.Qd1 Bf8 39.Bf1 Qd8 40.Rcc1 Rba8 41.Bh3 Qe7 42.Qf3 Bg7 43.cxd5 exd5 44.b4 axb4 45.Bxb4 Nf6 46.Bc5 Rxa4 47.Bxd6 Qxd6 48.Rxb7 Ne4 49.Nd3 Ng5 50.Qg4 Ne6 51.Qd1 Ng5 52.Bg2 Ne6 53.h4 Nd8 54.Rb6 R4a6 55.Rxa6 Rxa6 56.Bh3 Bf8 57.Nc5 Ra7 58.Qb3 Qc7 59.Nd7 Qd6 60.Ne5 Bg7 61.Nd3 Bf8 62.Bg2 Qa3 63.Qd1 Bd6 64.h5 Kg7 65.Bf3 Qa6 66.Be2 Qb7 67.Kg2 Qe7 68.Bf3 Ra2 69.Qb3 Ra3 70.Qb1 Qd7 71.Rh1 Qb7 72.Nf4 Qxb1 73.Rxb1 Kf6 74.Rb6 Ke7 75.Nh3 Bc7 76.Rb2 Kf6 77.Bg4 Bd6 78.Ng1 Kg5 79.Kh3 f5 80.Be2 Kf6 81.Nf3 Rc3 82.Kg2 Ra3 83.Rc2 Ra7 84.Ne1 Rc7 85.Nd3 Ne6 86.Bf3 g5 87.Ra2 g4 88.Be2 Kg5 89.Ra6 Kxh5 90.Bd1 Nd8 91.Bb3 Nf7 92.Ba4 Nd8 93.Ra8 Nf7 94.Re8 Kg6 95.Nf4+ Bxf4 96.Re6+ Kg7 97.gxf4 c5 98.dxc5 Rxc5 99.Be8 Rc7 100.Kg3 Kf8 101.Bb5 Kg7 102.Bd3 Nh6 103.Rd6 Rc5 104.Kh4 Nf7 105.Rd7 d4 106.exd4 Rc3 107.Bxf5 Kf6 108.Bxg4 Rd3 109.Bh5 Nh6 110.Rd6+ Kg7 111.Kg5 Nf7+ 112.Bxf7 Kxf7 113.f5 Ke7 114.Re6+ Kf7 115.Rd6 Ke7 116.Re6+ Kf7 117.Re4 Rd2 118.Rf4 Rd1 119.f6 Ra1 120.Kf5 Ra6 121.d5 h5 122.Kg5 Ra5 123.Rf5 Ra1 124.Kxh5 Rg1 125.Kh4 Rg8 126.Kh5 Rg1 127.Kh4 Rg8 128.Rg5 Rh8+ 129.Rh5 Rg8 130.Rg5 Rh8+ 131.Kg4 Kxf6 132.Rh5 Rg8+ 133.Kf4 Rg1 134.Rh6+ Ke7 135.Kf5 Rd1 136.Ke5 Re1+ 137.Kf5 Rd1 138.d6+ Kd7 139.f4 Rd5+ 140.Ke4 Ra5 141.f5 Ra1 142.Ke5 Re1+ 143.Kf6 Rf1 144.Rh2 Rd1 145.Re2 Rg1 146.Kf7 Rf1 147.f6 Rg1 148.Kf8 Rf1 149.f7 Rg1 150.Re7+ Kd8 151.d7 Rg2 152.Re8+ Kxd7 153.Re4 Ra2 154.Rg4 1-0

Kevin Bonham
20-08-2013, 02:17 AM
Through in the first stage of rapid:

Caruana
Kramnik
Le Quang Liem (upsets Grischuk who tried in vain to beat him with KRN v KR in the second rapid)
Mamedyarov
Korobov
Ivanchuk
Granda Zuniga !!

Karjakin has just been smashed with a combo by Eljanov in their first game at the next stage. Moro-Vitiugov and Dreev-Andreikin also in playoffs (Dreev should have eliminated Andreikin but allowed him to get back in the second rapid.)

Kevin Bonham
20-08-2013, 03:37 AM
Andreikin eliminates Dreev.

Karjakin equalises against Eljanov, they go to blitz.

Vitiugov misses win against Morozevich, they go to blitz.

Kevin Bonham
20-08-2013, 04:50 AM
Karjakin and Moro through. Moro's opponent missed an endgame draw that would have taken their match to Armageddon. (Rook and one pawn vs rook and two, but the two pawns were both f-pawns, so he just had to give up his pawn. He chose to get mated instead.)

Kevin Bonham
21-08-2013, 12:07 AM
Morozevich (16)-Tomashevsky (32)
Kamsky (8) - Mamedyarov (9)
Le Quang Liem (29) - Svidler (13)
Andreikin (21) - Karjakin (5)
Caruana (2) - Granda Zuniga (50)
Vachier-Lagrave (23) - Gelfand (7)
Ivanchuk (19) - Kramnik (3)
Nakamura (6) - Korobov (22)

Nine of the 16 were expected based on seeding to get this far.

Kevin Bonham
21-08-2013, 10:02 AM
Wins for Kamsky, Caruana, Kramnik, the rest drawn (after various adventures in some cases)

Kamsky - Mamedyarov

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.f4 d6 7.Be3 Nf6 8.Qf3 a6 9.Bd3 Be7 10.O-O O-O 11.Kh1 Bd7 12.Rae1 b5 13.a3 Rab8 14.Nxc6 Bxc6 15.Qh3 Rfd8 16.Bd2 d5 17.e5 Ne4 18.f5 Nxd2 19.fxe6 Ne4 20.exf7+ Kh8 21.Nxd5 Bxd5 22.Rxe4 g6 23.Ref4 Kg7 24.e6 Rf8 25.Qe3 Bc5 26.Qe1 Bd6 27.Rh4 Be7 28.Qe3 h5 29.Qd4+ Kh6 30.Rxh5+ 1-0

*applause*

BrendanNorman
21-08-2013, 06:19 PM
Did anybody else notice Shirov's situation?

He had to play Hou Yifan in round 1 and beat her then had to play Wei Yi in round 2 (whom he lost to).

Some people on this forum on seeing this might like to call it the "Chinese world cup" haha.:lol:

I have my doubts about whether Wei Yi is truly 14 years old but thats another topic all together... very interesting all of this though.

Kevin Bonham
22-08-2013, 01:21 AM
Chinese delegation didn't hang around too long; none of them made this round.

Kramnik draws with Ivanchuk; Kramnik through, Ivanchuk out.

Kevin Bonham
22-08-2013, 01:49 AM
Svidler, Le Quang Liam - draw -> playoffs
Gelfand, Vachier-Lagrave ditto
Tomashevsky, Morozevich ditto (Tomashevsky looked better but got low on time.)

Kevin Bonham
22-08-2013, 02:01 AM
Mamedyarov - Kamsky draw; Kamsky through Shak out.

Another amazing game and Kamsky was very short of time during the difficult bits.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.h4 dxc4 6.e4 O-O 7.h5 c5 8.hxg6 hxg6 9.d5 b5 10.Bh6 Bxh6 11.Rxh6 b4 12.Na4 Kg7 13.Rh4 c3 14.bxc3 bxc3 15.Rc1 Rh8 16.Rxh8 Qxh8 17.Nxc5 Nbd7 18.Nxd7 Bxd7 19.e5 Ne4 20.Qd4 Bf5 21.Qe3 Qh1 22.Nd4 Rb8 23.d6 Rb2 24.d7 Rxf2 25.Qxf2 Nxf2 26.Nxf5+ gxf5 27.d8=Q Qh4 28.Ke2 Qe4+ 29.Kxf2 Qf4+ 30.Ke2 Qxc1 31.Qd1 Qb2+ 32.Kd3 Qxa2 33.Kxc3 Qa5+ 34.Kb3 -

Kevin Bonham
22-08-2013, 02:51 AM
Caruana through, finally ending Granda Zuniga's fine run.
Nakamura looks like he'll be out against Korobov very soon.

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 01:29 AM
Vachier-Lagrave is through, eliminating Gelfand.
Andreikin is about to eliminate Karjakin as well, so a couple of mild upsets there.

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 01:59 AM
Svidler through over Le, won a difficult ending with BNP v RP, forcing his pawn through to force KBN v K and winning on move 135.

Morozevich - Tomashevsky continue to next stage of playoff (10+10)

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 02:46 AM
Tomashevsky blunders in game 1 at 10/10 losing a piece in view of a threat of smothered mate. Must now win with black in game 2 or out.

that Caesar guy
23-08-2013, 04:14 AM
Tomashevsky blunders in game 1 at 10/10 losing a piece in view of a threat of smothered mate. Must now win with black in game 2 or out.
...which he did. In 169 moves. Amazing game. On we go to the blitz!

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 04:15 AM
Svidler's game was a tiddler.

Morozevich - Tomashevsky (10/10, black must win)

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 Nc6 5.c3 g6 6.Nf3 Bf5 7.Bxf5 gxf5 8.Bg5 Bg7 9.Qd3 Qd7 10.Nbd2 Nf6 11.Bxf6 Bxf6 12.O-O-O O-O-O 13.Nb3 e6 14.Nc5 Qc7 15.Qe2 Kb8 16.Kb1 Ne7 17.Nd3 Nc8 18.Nfe5 h5 19.g3 Nd6 20.f3 Ka8 21.Rhe1 Rb8 22.Nf4 Bg5 23.Nfd3 Rbc8 24.h4 Bf6 25.Nf4 Rcg8 26.Rg1 a6 27.Rde1 Re8 28.Ka1 Ka7 29.Rc1 Rc8 30.Rge1 Bg7 31.Rcd1 Qb6 32.Qc2 Qc7 33.Qe2 Rcg8 34.Rg1 Bf6 35.Rde1 Rg7 36.Qf2 Ka8 37.Qe2 Ka7 38.Qf2 Nc4 39.Nxc4 Qxc4 40.Qd2 Be7 41.Nd3 Bd6 42.Ne5 Qc7 43.f4 Rhg8 44.Qf2 Bxe5 45.Rxe5 b5 46.a3 a5 47.Re3 Rb8 48.Qf3 Rh7 49.Kb1 Rhh8 50.Rc1 Rb6 51.Rc2 Kb8 52.Qe2 Kc8 53.b3 Kd7 54.Kb2 Ke7 55.Rd3 Qa7 56.Qe5 f6 57.Qe2 Kf7 58.Re3 Qd7 59.Rc1 Kg6 60.Re1 Re8 61.Ka2 Kh6 62.Kb2 Qc6 63.Qd3 Qb7 64.Qe2 Qd7 65.Ka2 Rd6 66.Kb2 Qc6 67.Ka2 Qb6 68.Qd2 Rc8 69.Kb2 Rcc6 70.R1e2 Qa6 71.Qe1 Qc8 72.Qd2 Ra6 73.Qe1 Rdb6 74.Qd2 Rb7 75.Qe1 Re7 76.Qd2 Kg6 77.Qe1 Rc6 78.Rc2 b4 79.a4 Rec7 80.Qd2 Qa6 81.Rc1 Qb7 82.Rd3 Qc8 83.Re3 Qa6 84.Rf3 Qb6 85.Rd3 Qa7 86.Rf3 Qb8 87.Re3 Kf7 88.c4 dxc4 89.bxc4 Rxc4 90.Rxc4 Rxc4 91.d5 Re4 92.dxe6+ Kxe6 93.Rd3 Qc7 94.Qd1 Qc6 95.Qb3+ Ke7 96.Qd1 Qe6 97.Rd2 Re3 98.Qc2 Kf7 99.Rd3 Re2 100.Rd2 Rxd2 101.Qxd2 Qc6 102.Qd3 Ke6 103.Qe2+ Kd6 104.Qd3+ Qd5 105.Qa6+ Kd7 106.Qa7+ Ke6 107.Qb6+ Kf7 108.Qc7+ Kg6 109.Qc8 Qd2+ 110.Kb1 Qd3+ 111.Kb2 Qa3+ 112.Kb1 Qb3+ 113.Kc1 Qd5 114.Kb2 Kf7 115.Qc7+ Ke8 116.Qc8+ Ke7 117.Qc7+ Ke6 118.Qb6+ Qd6 119.Qe3+ Kd7 120.Qa7+ Qc7 121.Qd4+ Ke6 122.Qe3+ Kf7 123.Qd3 Ke7 124.Qe3+ Kf8 125.Qd4 Kg7 126.Qe3 Qb7 127.Qe2 Qc6 128.Qe7+ Kg6 129.Qd8 Qc3+ 130.Kb1 Qb3+ 131.Kc1 Qc4+ 132.Kb2 Qe6 133.Qxa5 Qe2+ 134.Kb3 Qe3+ 135.Kxb4 Qxg3 136.Qc7 Qxh4 137.a5 Qe1+ 138.Kb5 Qb1+ 139.Kc5 Qc2+ 140.Kd6 Qd3+ 141.Ke7 h4 142.Kf8 Kh5 143.Kg7 h3 144.Kxf6 Kg4 145.Qg7+ Kf3 146.Qb7+ Qe4 147.a6 h2 148.Qxe4+ fxe4 149.a7 h1=Q 150.a8=Q Qh6+ 151.Ke7 Qxf4 152.Qd5 Kg3 153.Qg8+ Qg4 154.Qb8+ Kf3 155.Qh2 e3 156.Qh1+ Kf2 157.Qh2+ Qg2 158.Qf4+ Qf3 159.Qh4+ Kf1 160.Qc4+ e2 161.Kd8 Qf5 162.Kc7 Kf2 163.Qh4+ Ke3 164.Qe1 Qc2+ 165.Kb8 Qb3+ 166.Ka7 Kd3 167.Qg3+ Kc2 168.Qe1 Qe3+ 169.Ka6 Qd2 0-1

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 04:44 AM
Tomashevsky wins blitz 1 as well.

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 05:13 AM
End of the road for Moro.

1.c4 b6 2.Nc3 Bb7 3.d4 e6 4.a3 f5 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.g3 Ne4 7.Bd2 Be7 8.Bg2 O-O 9.O-O Bf6 10.Rc1 c5 11.d5 exd5 12.cxd5 d6 13.h4 h6 14.Bf4 g5 15.hxg5 hxg5 16.Be3 Qe7 17.Nxe4 fxe4 18.Nd2 Bxd5 19.Nc4 Qe6 20.Bh3 Qxh3 21.Qxd5+ Kg7 22.Nxd6 Nd7 23.Qxe4 Rh8 24.Qg2 Bxb2 25.Rcd1 Qxg2+ 26.Kxg2 Ne5 27.Bxg5 Bxa3 28.Bd2 Bb4 29.Bc1 Kg6 30.Bb2 Rh5 31.Rh1 Rxh1 32.Rxh1 Nf7 33.Ne4 a5 34.f4 c4 35.g4 Nd6 36.f5+ Nxf5 37.gxf5+ Kxf5 38.Kf3 Rc8 39.Rh6 c3 40.Bxc3 Bxc3 41.Nd6+ Kg5 42.Nf7+ Kf5 43.Nd6+ Kg5 44.Nf7+ -1/2

(Tomashevksy could mate with a pawn but forces perpetual check instead, because he can.)

Desmond
23-08-2013, 07:22 AM
(Tomashevksy could mate with a pawn but forces perpetual check instead, because he can.)
Geez I don't know if I could resist mating with a pawn. Still, maybe this is funnier. :D

Adamski
23-08-2013, 08:04 AM
Vachier-Lagrave is through, eliminating Gelfand.
Andreikin is about to eliminate Karjakin as well, so a couple of mild upsets there.
Great results for the underdogs.

Kevin Bonham
23-08-2013, 01:38 PM
Eight players remain

32 Tomashevsky - 8 Kamsky
13 Svidler - 21 Andreikin
2 Caruana - 23 Vachier-Lagrave
3 Kramnik - 22 Korobov

Usual suspects vs dark horses in every case.

pax
23-08-2013, 03:40 PM
Some people on this forum on seeing this might like to call it the "Chinese world cup" haha.:lol:

If there were 40 Chinese players in the competition, they might have a case. What's your point again?

BrendanNorman
23-08-2013, 04:38 PM
If there were 40 Chinese players in the competition, they might have a case. What's your point again?

It was a joke, hence the emoticon.. Take your meds mate, you're a bit jumpy today...

Bill Gletsos
23-08-2013, 05:17 PM
Vachier-Lagrave is through, eliminating Gelfand.
Andreikin is about to eliminate Karjakin as well, so a couple of mild upsets there.Karjakin will now be hoping that Kramnik makes the final.
That way he will get the second spot based on average rating for the 2014 Candidates. If Kramnik doesnt make it to the final then Kramnik will get the second rating spot.

Kevin Bonham
24-08-2013, 12:50 PM
Kramnik defeated Korobov; the rest were draws.

Desmond
24-08-2013, 12:53 PM
Kramnik defeated Korobov; the rest were draws.
Yeah Kramnik is playing very well.

I'm really enjoying Svidler's post game comments.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
24-08-2013, 03:37 PM
Geez I don't know if I could resist mating with a pawn. Still, maybe this is funnier. :D

Amusing finishes are always appreciated. ;)

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2013, 01:55 AM
Svidler, Andreikin ----> playoff tomorrow

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2013, 03:12 AM
Sad end for Kamsky after his great result in his previous match. Tomashevsky first player to the semis after the h-pawn (repeatedly named as Herbert by Nigel Short) could not be stopped without losing following 36.Qd4??

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 O-O 8.h3 Bb7 9.d3 d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.a4 Nd4 12.Nbd2 Nxb3 13.Nxb3 Nb4 14.axb5 Bxf3 15.gxf3 axb5 16.Rxa8 Qxa8 17.Rxe5 Bd6 18.Rxb5 Re8 19.Kg2 h6 20.Nc5 Nd5 21.Ne4 Qc6 22.Nxd6 Qxd6 23.c4 c6 24.Rb3 Nf4+ 25.Bxf4 Qxf4 26.d4 Qg5+ 27.Kf1 Qh5 28.Re3 Qxh3+ 29.Ke2 Rb8 30.Qc2 h5 31.b3 Ra8 32.d5 cxd5 33.cxd5 Qd7 34.Qd1 Ra6 35.b4 h4 36.Qd4 h3 37.Kf1 h2 38.Kg2 h1=Q+ 39.Kxh1 Qh3+ 40.Kg1 Rg6+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2013, 03:45 AM
Nigel Short on Kramnik and a possible R vs R+B ending. Approximate quote:

"If he gets that endgame he will draw it. I've lost that endgame several times ... [to co-commentator] you've lost it, he will not. Because he's a proper chessplayer."

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2013, 03:49 AM
Caruana, Vachier-Lagrave ----> playoff tomorrow

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2013, 03:56 AM
Korobov would have beaten Kramnik if he was Kramnik, but he wasn't. Draw and Korobov eliminated, Kramnik through.

Kevin Bonham
26-08-2013, 01:04 AM
I didn't see it but Svidler blundered in the first tiebreak game (which I can't find). Andreikin then played a strong game to completely snuff out Svidler's chances. So now either Andreikin or Tomashevsky will qualify for the Candidates tournament next year!

Kevin Bonham
26-08-2013, 01:25 AM
Dark horses 3-1 usual suspects as Vachier-Lagrave eliminates Caruana!

1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 d6 4.Nc3 d5 5.Nf3 e6 6.O-O Be7 7.Bf4 O-O 8.Nb5 Ne8 9.c4 c6 10.Nc3 Nd7 11.Qb3 Kh8 12.Rad1 Nd6 13.cxd5 exd5 14.Ne5 Nf6 15.Nd3 Nh5 16.e3 Qe8 17.Rfe1 Nf6 18.f3 Qd8 19.Re2 b6 20.Qa4 Bd7 21.Ne5 Be8 22.Rc1 Rc8 23.Qd1 h6 24.Nd3 Bf7 25.Bh3 Be6 26.Qa4 Bd7 27.Qc2 Qe8 28.Be5 Nh7 29.Bg2 Ng5 30.Qa4 Ra8 31.Rce1 Nc4 32.Bf4 Ne6 33.Qd1 Bf6 34.b3 Na5 35.Bd6 Rg8 36.Be5 Qf7 37.Qc2 Rae8 38.Rf2 h5 39.Ne2 Nb7 40.e4 c5 41.exd5 Nxd4 42.Nxd4 cxd4 43.f4 Bb5 44.a4 Rc8 45.Qd2 Bd7 46.Rfe2 Rge8 47.Bxf6 gxf6 48.Ne5 Qg7 49.Nxd7 Qxd7 50.Qxd4 Kg7 51.Bf3 Nc5 52.d6 Rxe2 53.Rxe2 Re8 54.Bxh5 Rxe2 55.Bxe2 Nxb3 56.Qd5 Nc5 57.Bb5 Qf7 58.Qxf7+ Kxf7 59.h4 Nb7 60.d7 Nd8 61.Bc4+ Kf8 62.Bd5 a6 63.Kf2 b5 64.axb5 axb5 65.Ke3 Ke7 66.h5 1-0

Desmond
26-08-2013, 07:32 AM
I didn't see it but Svidler blundered in the first tiebreak game (which I can't find). It's on the live page, round 5 game 3.

1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 e6 3.Nd2 h6 4.Bh4 c5 5.e3 Be7 6.c3 b6 7.Ngf3 Ba6 8.Bxf6 Bxf6 9.Bxa6 Nxa6 10.Ne4 cxd4 11.Nxf6+ Qxf6 12.cxd4 Qe7 13.O-O O-O 14.Qa4 Nc7 15.Rac1 Nd5 16.Ne5 d6 17.Nd3 Rfc8 18.h3 Qb7 19.Qa3 Qd7 20.Qa6 f5 21.Rfe1 Kf7 22.Nf4 Nb4 23.Qe2 Nxa2 24.Rxc8 Rxc8 25.e4 Nb4 26.exf5 exf5 27.Qf3 a5 28.Re6 Kg8 29.Qg3 Nd5 30.Qb3

Kevin Bonham
27-08-2013, 12:50 AM
Been such a thrilling tournament but not so riveting today - draws in 14 and 16 moves so Tomashevsky and Kramnik can go for it with white tomorrow.

Kevin Bonham
27-08-2013, 12:59 AM
Kramnik doesn't like the tournament system - he's bagging out the way players deliberately play for draws to go for the rapids if they are good at rapids.

Garvinator
27-08-2013, 01:07 AM
Been such a thrilling tournament but not so riveting today - draws in 14 and 16 moves so Tomashevsky and Kramnik can go for it with white tomorrow.
So both semi final first games are over already? There is always discussions about how to get rid of this curse. An idea that I just thought of is that perhaps if under this format is a game is drawn inside 1 hour (perhaps two hours), then the second game will be started one hour later.

Desmond
27-08-2013, 07:44 AM
Short draws have hardly been a problem at this tournament. They have been the exception, not the rule. In part due to the structure - most of the rounds have a large rating gap between the two players. Also you don't want to be acquiescing to a quick draw with White if you have to defend tomorrow.

Kevin Bonham
27-08-2013, 08:54 PM
So both semi final first games are over already? There is always discussions about how to get rid of this curse. An idea that I just thought of is that perhaps if under this format is a game is drawn inside 1 hour (perhaps two hours), then the second game will be started one hour later.

I have a more effective deterrent. If either game is drawn inside two hours then Armageddon will be started one minute later. :lol:

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2013, 01:41 AM
Tomashevsky - Andreikin drawn in 29. Playoffs for them tomorrow.

Kramnik better and trying to grind against Vachier-Lagrave but not clear he will have enough. Pawn up but may end up with pawns all on one side.

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2013, 04:23 AM
Kramnik nearly beat Vachier-Lagrave. 58...Kf1 was a mistake (...Nd6 was correct) and Kramnik was apparently winning for a few moves but missed a subtle win short of time starting with 62.Nd7! (The line is not easy to see.) As a result he couldn't keep the pawn. As I write they're playing out KRN v KR which should be drawn. Only bunnies like me should lose KRN v KR even when extremely short of time. :lol: (Actually L'Ami lost it against Carlsen.)

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 Nbd7 7.Nxc4 Nb6 8.Ne5 a5 9.e3 Nbd7 10.Nc4 Qb8 11.Bd3 Bxd3 12.Qxd3 e5 13.0-0 Bb4 14.Qf5 exd4 15.exd4 0-0 16.Rd1 Qe8 17.Bf4 Qe6 18.Qxe6 fxe6 19.Bd6 Rfd8 20.f3 Bxc3 21.bxc3 Nd5 22.Rdc1 b5 23.axb5 cxb5 24.Nxa5 Rdc8 25.Bb4 Rc7 26.Rab1 Rac8 27.h4 e5 28.Rd1 exd4 29.Rxd4 N7f6 30.Kh2 h6 31.Rb2 Nxc3 32.Bxc3 Rxc3 33.Rxb5 Rc2 34.Nb3 Kh7 35.Rdb4 R8c3 36.Kh3 Ra2 37.Nd4 Rc1 38.Ne6 Re1 39.Nf4 Ra7 40.h5 Rae7 41.g4 R1e5 42.Ng6 Rxb5 43.Rxb5 Re8 44.Rb7 Rd8 45.Kg3 Kg8 46.Kh4 Kh7 47.Ra7 Kg8 48.f4 Kh7 49.Rb7 Ne4 50.Rb4 Re8 51.g5 Nd6 52.Rb6 Nf7 53.Rb5 Re1 54.Nf8+ Kg8 55.Rb8 hxg5+ 56.fxg5 Rh1+ 57.Kg3 Rg1+ 58.Kf4 Rf1+ 59.Ke3 g6 60.hxg6 Kg7 61.gxf7 Kxf7 62.Ke4 [62.Nd7 Rf5 63.Rf8+ Kg6 64.Rg8+ Kf7 65.Ke4 Ra5 66.Rf8+ Kg6 67.Ne5+ Kxg5 68.Rf5+ and wins rook by discovered check next move] 62...Re1+ 63.Kf3 Rf1+ 64.Kg3 Rg1+ 65.Kf4 Rf1+ 66.Ke3 Re1+ 67.Kf3 Rf1+ 68.Kg2 Rf5 69.Nh7 Kg6 70.Rb7 Rf4 71.Kg3 Ra4 72.Re7 Rg4+ 73.Kf3 Ra4 74.Rb7 Rh4 75.Nf6 Kxg5 76.Ne4+ Kf5 77.Re7 Rh8 78.Ke3 Rd8 79.Rf7+ Ke6 80.Rh7 Rd1 81.Nc5+ Kf5 82.Rf7+ etc 1/2-1/2

Kramnik also blew a win with the same material (KRNP v KR) against Kasparov in their 2000 match - see http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1267516

Capablanca-Fan
28-08-2013, 08:41 AM
Kramnik nearly beat Vachier-Lagrave. 58...Kf1 was a mistake (...Nd6 was correct) and Kramnik was apparently winning for a few moves but missed a subtle win short of time starting with 62.Nd7! (The line is not easy to see.) As a result he couldn't keep the pawn. As I write they're playing out KRN v KR which should be drawn. Only bunnies like me should lose KRN v KR even when extremely short of time. :lol: (Actually L'Ami lost it against Carlsen.)
As did Judith Polgar against Kasparov (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070866), but not Alekhine against Capablanca (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1012508).

Garrett
28-08-2013, 10:26 AM
I held that against Solo earlier this year, and watched ZYZ hold it against Johansen at the SIO a couple of years ago.

Capablanca-Fan
28-08-2013, 12:45 PM
I held that against Solo earlier this year, and watched ZYZ hold it against Johansen at the SIO a couple of years ago.
If you could hold it against Solo, then you must have proved thoroughly that you knew what you were doing.

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2013, 04:29 PM
I've inserted the missed 62.Nd7 line in the game viewer above (haven't bothered adding moves 83-125). Writers who are calling Kramnik missing it a "blunder" are being very unfair. He did not have much time left and the winning line is study-like and several moves deep.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2013, 12:01 AM
Rapid 1 of playoffs

Tomashevsky - Andreikin draw
Vachier-Lagrave - Kramnik 0-1 (bad idea followed by big blunder)

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2013, 12:42 AM
Kramnik is through and Karjakin is a candidate for next year's Candidates - Kramnik's qualification by rating cascades down to Karjakin.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2013, 01:22 AM
Andreikin - Tomashevsky

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.Nc3 a6 5.c5 Bf5 6.Bf4 Nbd7 7.e3 g6 8.Qb3 Qc8 9.h3 Bg7 10.Be2 O-O 11.O-O Ne4 12.Rac1 Re8 13.Nxe4 Bxe4 14.Ng5 Nf6 15.Be5 h6 16.Bxf6 exf6 17.Nxe4 Rxe4 18.Bf3 Re7 19.h4 f5 20.g3 Qe6 21.Kg2 g5 22.hxg5 hxg5 23.Qd3 f4 24.exf4 gxf4 25.g4 Qg6 26.Rcd1 a5 27.Rh1 Rae8 28.Rh5 Re1 29.Rxe1 Rxe1 30.Qd2 Re8 31.Qxf4 Qf6 32.Rf5 Qxd4 33.Qc7 Rf8 34.Qxb7 Qxc5 35.Qd7 Qc2 36.g5 Bd4 37.Bh5 Qe4+ 38.Rf3 Kg7 39.Qxc6 Qh7 40.Qxd5 Qxh5 41.Qxd4+ Kg8 42.Rh3 1-0

Andreikin and Kramnik play in the final. Andreikin has beaten Kramnik a couple of times recently so it could be interesting.

Rest day tomorrow.

The following qualifiers for the candidates are now set: Kramnik, Aronian, Topalov, Karjakin, Andreikin.

The remaining spots are:

* Loser of Carlsen - Anand
* Second in GP (between Mamedyarov, Grischuk and Caruana)
* Wild card

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2013, 08:28 PM
Kramnik has white in game 1 tomorrow night.

In a way the final is a bit of an anticlimax. Nothing rides on it beyond that the winner wins the World Cup.

Kevin Bonham
31-08-2013, 04:01 AM
Kramnik wins game 1. I was very impressed with his play.

1.d4 e6 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3 h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.e3 b6 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Bb7 10.O-O Nbd7 11.Qe2 a6 12.Rfd1 Nd5 13.Bg3 Nxc3 14.bxc3 Bd6 15.e4 Bxg3 16.hxg3 b5 17.Bd3 Nb6 18.Qe3 Na4 19.Bc2 Nb2 20.Rdb1 Nc4 21.Qc1 c5 22.a4 cxd4 23.cxd4 Rc8 24.axb5 axb5 25.Qe1 Bc6 26.Rb4 Ra8 27.Rd1 Ra3 28.d5 exd5 29.exd5 Re8 30.dxc6 Rxe1+ 31.Nxe1 Qc7 32.Rxb5 g6 33.Rc5 Ne5 34.Be4 Ng4 35.Nd3 Kg7 36.Bf3 Nf6 37.Nb4 h5 38.Rdc1 Ra7 39.Nd5 Nxd5 40.Bxd5 Qd8 41.c7 Rxc7 42.Rxc7 Qxd5 43.Re1 Kh6 44.Ree7 f6 45.Red7 Qa5 46.f4 g5 47.Kh2 Kg6 48.fxg5 Kxg5 49.Rh7 f5 50.Rcg7+ Kf6 51.Ra7 Qb4 52.Ra6+ Ke5 53.Rxh5 Qb1 54.Ra5+ Kf6 55.Raxf5+ Kg6 56.Rfg5+ Kf6 57.Rb5 Qc2 58.Rh6+ Kg7 59.Rbb6 Qc5 60.Rbg6+ Kf8 61.Rh7 Qf5 62.Rgg7 Qe6 63.Re7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
01-09-2013, 01:30 AM
Game 2 drawn in 33. Kramnik one up, two to go.

Kevin Bonham
02-09-2013, 01:01 AM
Game 3 drawn in 27. Kramnik didn't do much with white. Andreikin must win with white tomorrow to force a playoff, otherwise Kramnik wins the World Cup.

Kevin Bonham
03-09-2013, 02:18 AM
Game 4 drawn in 34 with Kramnik in a very strong position.

Kramnik wins World Cup.

Capablanca-Fan
03-09-2013, 03:50 AM
Game 4 drawn in 34 with Kramnik in a very strong position.

Kramnik wins World Cup.
Another reason it was a disgrace that Carlsen didn't have to get through a play-off with Kramnik to challenge for the World Championship. That would have been a great match.