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Carl Gorka
10-07-2013, 08:38 PM
I've started looking at some openings on my blog (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/four-knights-opening.html).

Any feedback and criticism would be appreciated :)

Max Illingworth
10-07-2013, 10:00 PM
I covered a very similar subject in a blog post about a year ago (using the games Chadaev-Jumabayev, Chadaev-Karjakin and Nabaty-Kravtsiv), but the post is no longer online. I learned a few things from your post but then again it's been a year since I last studied this line.

Kevin Bonham
10-07-2013, 10:34 PM
I found it quite a useful article; I've been considering booking up on the S4N again for a while and didn't realise it had become that common.

Editorial advice - remove the apostrophe from "Knight's". It's grammatically incorrect and there are some people who get quite annoyed about incorrectly added apostrophes.

Capablanca-Fan
11-07-2013, 01:33 AM
I found it quite a useful article; I've been considering booking up on the S4N again for a while and didn't realise it had become that common.

Editorial advice - remove the apostrophe from "Knight's". It's grammatically incorrect and there are some people who get quite annoyed about incorrectly added apostrophes.
Four knights' would be correct, the plural genitive of "knight" since there are four of them. However, there seems to be a trend away from possessive apostrophes in proper names, so removal is safe.

Rincewind
11-07-2013, 10:16 AM
Four knights' would be correct, the plural genitive of "knight" since there are four of them. However, there seems to be a trend away from possessive apostrophes in proper names, so removal is safe.

It's not clear that possession is implied in this case. In the case of openings named after players some take the possessive (like Bird's) and others don't (like Reti) usually the King and Queen take the possessive but not necessarily other pieces (Like the King's Knight Opening). Looking at usage (in book titles at any rate) Larry Evans' book included the possessive (after the s) but most I could find on quick search of amazon don't including the authors Nunn, Obodchuk, Pinski and Lakdawala.

Carl Gorka
11-07-2013, 09:24 PM
I covered a very similar subject in a blog post about a year ago (using the games Chadaev-Jumabayev, Chadaev-Karjakin and Nabaty-Kravtsiv), but the post is no longer online. I learned a few things from your post but then again it's been a year since I last studied this line.

Thanks Max, I saw that you've used this opening line, as has David Smerdon. :)

Carl Gorka
11-07-2013, 09:25 PM
I found it quite a useful article; I've been considering booking up on the S4N again for a while and didn't realise it had become that common.

Editorial advice - remove the apostrophe from "Knight's". It's grammatically incorrect and there are some people who get quite annoyed about incorrectly added apostrophes.

Thanks for the feedback, and please keep it coming. I've corrected the grammar mistakes and am getting more inspired to write more opening articles.

Carl Gorka
19-07-2013, 12:29 AM
So does anyone have a favourite opening (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/hennig-schara-gambit.html)?

Carl Gorka
22-07-2013, 11:33 PM
Another pet line of mine is b4 in the Scandinavian (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/the-inspirational-jacques-mieses.html), inspired by the imaginative Jacques Mieses. His line of the Scotch is currently the height of fashion :)

Kevin Bonham
23-07-2013, 12:08 AM
Re your comment "3.Nc3 [I think I read somewhere that 3.Nf3 is more accurate, but whatever!]" I'm a 3.Nf3 devotee and find that the move is quite underexplored and seems to offer white just as much scope for the +/= one hopes for as anything else. It can be quite sharp and if Black misapplies ideas from 3.Nc3 lines black can get in lots of juicy trouble. Reading Jovanka Houska's book on the Scandinavian I found she had a similar opinion.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
23-07-2013, 02:57 PM
Re your comment "3.Nc3 [I think I read somewhere that 3.Nf3 is more accurate, but whatever!]" I'm a 3.Nf3 devotee and find that the move is quite underexplored and seems to offer white just as much scope for the +/= one hopes for as anything else. It can be quite sharp and if Black misapplies ideas from 3.Nc3 lines black can get in lots of juicy trouble. Reading Jovanka Houska's book on the Scandinavian I found she had a similar opinion.

i also play 3.Nf3.

it seems to get good results.

Carl Gorka
12-08-2013, 11:55 PM
More on the Hennig Schara (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/hennig-schara-time-again.html) :D

Thematic opening tactics are a good reason for studying some of these sharp lines. The tactics can sometimes be transferred to other openings, and even other positions completely.

James Peirce
13-08-2013, 02:39 PM
[QUOTE=Carl Gorka]So does anyone have a favourite opening?[QUOTE]
Definetely the scotch but i don't play it as much anymore.

Kevin Bonham
18-08-2013, 01:08 AM
Does anyone know: since when, and why, is 1.c4 g6 called the Great Snake Variation?

Bereaved
18-08-2013, 10:02 PM
Does anyone know: since when, and why, is 1.c4 g6 called the Great Snake Variation?

I believe that there was a book called Unorthodox Chess Openings by Joel Benjamin and Eric Schiller ( Batsford), which used this name

Take care and God Bless, Bereaved

GMIS
14-11-2013, 07:23 AM
I've started looking at some openings on my blog (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/four-knights-opening.html).

Any feedback and criticism would be appreciated :)

nice..check out my blog (http://gmchessacademy.blogspot.com/) too :)

claranow
28-05-2017, 05:01 PM
Great read,
it was always about the Scandinavian and Slav for me. Weirdly, those are the ones I was thought at first and they stayed with me. I find it quite difficult to get into any new opening, although I really need to.

claranow
04-06-2017, 01:47 AM
I was wondering if anyone uses Sokolsky Opening?
It was one of the first I've ever learned, but I am wondering if it is widely popular?

Kevin Bonham
04-06-2017, 08:27 AM
I was wondering if anyone uses Sokolsky Opening?
It was one of the first I've ever learned, but I am wondering if it is widely popular?

Two club-level players in my state, one about 1400 strength and the other about 1700, play it often.

I think it is more popular at club levels than higher levels. I don't remember anyone in Australia with a rating over 2000 who would play it frequently.

(For those who don't know what the "Sokolsky Opening" is, it is another name for the Orangutan, 1.b4).

Kaitlin
04-06-2017, 08:32 AM
The Orangutan rofl .... I luv it already ☺

Tomato
04-06-2017, 08:56 AM
Somebody named Anthony Santasiere played it a number of times
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?pid=32048&side=white&node=399267

claranow
04-06-2017, 09:35 PM
I think there are certain ways people are still taught differently worldwide, like Orangutan :) is known widely in Poland and my country (Czech), with some other openings Czech grandmaster would play, so I guess it occurs most often :)
Like I remember spending a lot of time n weak f7, when it often results in mistakes :) I find this somehow fascinating :)

Kevin Bonham
04-06-2017, 10:00 PM
Somebody named Anthony Santasiere played it a number of times
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?pid=32048&side=white&node=399267

Santasiere (who was IM strength or maybe weak modern GM strength) also favoured a delayed version with 1.Nf3 d5 2.b4 and wrote a book on it, calling it Santasiere's Folly. It doesn't seem to have really caught on. His idea was to avoid a quick ...e5, although black could play for a quick ...e5 anyway by playing a quick ...f6.

A similar idea for black is actually quite effective, as in the line 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.d4 b5 (now sometimes called the Spassky Variation), which is sound (thread here: http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?4357-1-Nf3-Nf6-2-g3-b5). I have played this line a few times with good results. It makes a good surprise weapon at club level as most opponents have no idea what's going on.

MichaelBaron
04-06-2017, 11:54 PM
Well in Australia, Erik Teichmann (English FM who lives here) plays it exclusively every time he is white. Out of the regular users - Sokolsky and Katalymov have probably been the strongest but various GMs used it on some occasions.

Kevin Bonham
05-06-2017, 10:09 AM
Well in Australia, Erik Teichmann (English FM who lives here) plays it exclusively every time he is white.

Of course! How could I forget; I played in a simul against him where he was saying he was a specialist in it and allowing his opponents to insist he made a different first move.

Rincewind
05-06-2017, 10:12 AM
Well in Australia, Erik Teichmann (English FM who lives here) plays it exclusively every time he is white. Out of the regular users - Sokolsky and Katalymov have probably been the strongest but various GMs used it on some occasions.

Tartakower used in famously and gave it the name orangutan. Regarding Alexei Sokolsky, he wrote a famous book on the opening but in a lesser known work "Your First Move" which is a biginners book on chess generally he include a chapter on various major openings including 1.b4. :)

claranow
13-06-2017, 01:42 AM
Réti Opening for me with Jf3 as a starting piece. I feel very comfortable with starting with my knight, probably because I've been on it since beginning :)

1Nf3
10-09-2021, 09:12 AM
Réti Opening for me with Jf3 as a starting piece. I feel very comfortable with starting with my knight, probably because I've been on it since beginning :)

I also play 1 Nf3. But unlike you, I worked my way around the board first. Trying opening after opening in the hope of finding that non-existent silver bullet.

I played e4 when I first started playing. At the time, that's what all of us patzers played.

After a long break from chess I bought Tony Kosten's book 'The Dynamic English' and the English kind of worked for me for a while.

Playing again now, after many chess-less years - on the back of inspiration from 'The Queen's Gambit' on TV - I went on the lookout for a new opening.

In my search I saw a reference somewhere to Aleksander Wojtkiewicz, who lived an absolutely fascinating life and I inadvertently discovered 1Nf3. I used his book 'Wojo's Weapons' as my Bible for just long enough to learn the very basics of 1Nf3.

But it was finding Vladimir Kramnik's excellent series of books on 1Nf3 that gave it validation to me and I couldn't recommend them more highly.

Kramnik's books are called 'Opening For White According To Kramnik - 1Nf3' and there are 7 books in the series.