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Qbert
08-05-2013, 12:15 PM
With Kramnik pulled out, it will be hard to go past Magnus to win this with added home advantage. :) But it will be interesting if Topalov can continue his recent form and Radjabov turn around his...

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
08-05-2013, 02:05 PM
the winner is wang ;)

Oepty
08-05-2013, 03:26 PM
Perhaps Magnus Carlsen will be focusing more on the WC match and that will be a bit of distraction for him. Same for Anand, but he is unlikely to win the tournament anyway. There individual games will be interesting as well for the same reason.
However Carlsen has to be favourite for any tournament he plays.

ER
08-05-2013, 04:13 PM
Since Vassili who mercilessly kicked the butts of all high flyers in the candidates is not playing I go for Topalov!
GO VESKO!!!

Garrett
08-05-2013, 05:55 PM
lol @ Caesar.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
08-05-2013, 07:23 PM
It feels good, when you know you're down

A super dope homeboy from the Oak town

And I'm known as such

And this is a beat, uh, you can't touch

Agent Smith
08-05-2013, 10:02 PM
Huge line up. Topalov got smashed in the Blitz prelude, which was won by Car Jacking.

Hard to pick a winner for this. I hope Magnus doesnt win... He needs a settler or two before Chennai.

William AS
08-05-2013, 11:15 PM
Caesar's pick is likely to get hammered in this field. ;) :lol:

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
09-05-2013, 02:24 AM
Caesar's pick is likely to get hammered in this field. ;) :lol:

at least he's won a grammy. ;)

Adamski
09-05-2013, 08:06 AM
at least he's won a grammy. ;)
If Hammer turns out to be a bit of a shark we coukd call him M C Hammerhead!:)

Oepty
09-05-2013, 07:42 PM
So the hammering of Jon started over night with Peter Svidler being victor.
Radjabov is in terrible form, Karjakin beating him quite straightforwardly it seemed to me.
And Nakamura beat Wang Hao.
Leaving draws between Carlsen and Topalov and, Anand and Aronian, perhaps 4 of the top 5 players in the world.

Kevin Bonham
09-05-2013, 07:52 PM
Radjabov is in terrible form, Karjakin beating him quite straightforwardly it seemed to me.

I just cannot see what Radjabov was thinking with taking on d5.

Oepty
09-05-2013, 09:02 PM
I just cannot see what Radjabov was thinking with taking on d5.

I cannot either.

Kevin Bonham
11-05-2013, 08:18 PM
Anand nice win against Topalov in round 3:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e5 7.Nb3 Be6 8.f3 Be7 9.Qd2 0-0 10.0-0-0 Nbd7 11.g4 b5 12.Rg1 Nb6 13.Na5 Rc8 14.g5 Nh5 15.Kb1 Nf4 16.a3 g6 17.h4 Qc7 18.Bxf4 exf4 19.Nd5 Bxd5 20.exd5 Nxd5 21.Qxd5 Qxa5 22.Rg4 Rc5 23.Qb3 d5 24.Rxf4 Qc7 25.Rfd4 Qh2 26.c3 Rd8 27.Qc2 Qg3 28.f4 Bd6 29.Bg2 Bxf4 30.Bxd5 Kg7 31.Qe4 Qe3 32.Qh1 Rd7 33.R1d3 Qe5 34.Qf3 Bh2 35.Be6 Re7 36.Re4 Rxe6 37.Rxe5 Rcxe5 38.Rd8 Re4 39.Ka2 Bf4 40.Rd7 Kg8 41.Ra7 1-0

Karjakin leads on 3/3 from Aronian and Anand 2, Carlsen, Nakamura, Svidler and Radjabov 1.5.

Oepty
12-05-2013, 08:57 AM
Anand on 2/3 after playing Topalov, Carlsen and Aronian.
Karjakin on 3/3 after playing Radjabov, Wang Hao and Hammer

I wonder who has had the better start to the tournament.

Agent Smith
12-05-2013, 01:28 PM
It's a great roll-up, but for me the whole tournament is a little 'meh' because of the presence of Anand and Magnus and their upcoming championship.

Kevin Bonham
12-05-2013, 02:11 PM
Anand on 2/3 after playing Topalov, Carlsen and Aronian.
Karjakin on 3/3 after playing Radjabov, Wang Hao and Hammer

I wonder who has had the better start to the tournament.

Even if Karjakin had dropped half a point he would still have the higher TPR. But Radjabov is having a shocking run at the moment.

Oepty
12-05-2013, 05:40 PM
Even if Karjakin had dropped half a point he would still have the higher TPR. But Radjabov is having a shocking run at the moment.

My point is rather I would be surprised of Anand did not beat Hammer and Radjabov in his current form and he has to be a favourite to beat Wang Hao.
However I am not sure Karjakin will do as well as Anand against Topalov, Aronian and Carlsen,
I think Anand is in at least as good a position as Karjakin to win the tournament despite being a point behind.
It seems rather unusual for Anand to start off the tournament against the three players he did.

Oepty
13-05-2013, 06:52 AM
My point is rather I would be surprised of Anand did not beat Hammer and Radjabov in his current form and he has to be a favourite to beat Wang Hao.
However I am not sure Karjakin will do as well as Anand against Topalov, Aronian and Carlsen,
I think Anand is in at least as good a position as Karjakin to win the tournament despite being a point behind.
It seems rather unusual for Anand to start off the tournament against the three players he did.

Who wrote this stupid post. He obviously has no idea.

Karjakin beats Aronian with black and Anand loses to Nakamura with white. Hammer also managed to draw with Topalov.

peter_parr
13-05-2013, 12:15 PM
The following article was published in the 41st year of my chess column in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 13 May 2013.

Ten contestants including seven of the top ten rated players in the world are competing for a prize fund of $ 356,000 (1st $ 129,000 ) in Stavanger, Norway.

V.Anand (IND,World Champion 2783) v V.Topalov (BUL, ex World Champion 2793) B90
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be6 8. f3 Be7 9. Qd2 O-O 10. O-O-O Nbd7 11. g4 b5 12. Rg1 Nb6 13. Na5 Rc8 14. g5 Nh5 15. Kb1 Nf4 16. a3 g6 17. h4 Qc7 18. Bxf4 exf4 19. Nd5! Bxd5 20. exd5 Nxd5 21. Qxd5 Qxa5 22. Rg4 Rc5 23. Qb3 d5 24. Rxf4 Qc7 25. Rfd4 Qh2 26. c3 Rd8 27. Qc2 Qg3 28. f4 Bd6? 29. Bg2 Bxf4 30. Bxd5 Kg7 31. Qe4 Qe3 32. Qh1 Rd7 33. R1d3 Qe5 34. Qf3 Bh2 35. Be6 Re7 36. Re4 Rxe6 37. Rxe5 Rcxe5 38. Rd8 Re4 39. Ka2 Bf4 40. Rd7 Kg8 41. Ra7 1-0

Leading scores after round 3 :- S.Karjakin (RUS 2767) 3 ; L.Aronian (ARM 2813), V.Anand (IND 2783) 2 ; M.Carlsen (NOR 2868), H.Nakamura (USA 2775), P.Svidler (RUS 2769), T.Radjabov (AZE 2745) 1.5.

Kevin Bonham
17-05-2013, 09:39 PM
Karjakin still leading 5.5/7 from Carlsen 5 with Anand and Aronian on 4. Karjakin has Svidler and Topalov to play while Carlsen has Aronian and Wang Hao.

Saragossa
18-05-2013, 11:28 AM
V. exciting final. Karjakin (5.5) is open to outright beatings from Carlsen (5) and Anand (5) but, also open to split firsts (BLITZ DEATH MATCH BABY!) from Svidler, Aronian and Nakamura.

Nakamura and Svidler might be bones in the throat having "easy" games vs Hammer and Radjabov respectively. Wouldn't it be beautiful if Anand draws Hao, Carlsen draws Aronian, Naka and Svidler win and Karjakin loses!? It's all down to Topa to steal the show and leave us with 5 way blitz off (which, how do they run? http://norwaychess.com/en/tie-break-rules/ There are the tie breaks)

Bollard
18-05-2013, 12:33 PM
Very uncharacteristic play from Carlsen. We've come to expect him to find hidden resources in those sorts of positions.

But of course Hao still had to have the skill to finish off the win.

Kevin Bonham
18-05-2013, 01:19 PM
Pairings are Aronian - Carlsen, Wang Hao - Anand, Hammer - Nakamura, Radjabov - Svidler, Karjakin - Topalov.

Round starts midday Norway time which appears to be 8pm AEST!

Kevin Bonham
18-05-2013, 08:58 PM
Found this re ties:

If two players share first place, there will be a 2 game match with the same time control as in the blitz tournament: 4 min + 2 sec increment for each move. If this match ends in a tie, there will be an Armageddon game where white has 5 min+2 sec increments and black has 4 min+2 sec increment with draw odds. If more than two players share first place, there will be a double round robin with the same tiebreak rules as the opening blitz tournament.

which were:

Tiebreak:
A: Sonneborn Berger
B: Most wins
C: Most wins with black
D: Shared place and prizes.

Kevin Bonham
19-05-2013, 01:37 AM
Karjakin wins on 6/9 half a point up on Carlsen and Nakamura; Anand lost to Wang Hao in a game that at a quick look seems to have been pretty ugly for him as he was Q for BB down quite early.

Another fine result for CC tipping with none of the 15 tipsters getting it right! :rolleyes:

Bollard
19-05-2013, 06:44 AM
Would this be the toughest tournament (on ratings anyway) that Karjakin has won?

Would appear to be the biggest win of his career.

Agent Smith
19-05-2013, 10:51 AM
It's a pretty high ranking tourney. 22nd in my database, which includes Blitz and other stuff. He also won the rapid preliminary.

I'm a little disappointed Anand tried to fight out a fairly hopeless position in the last round. Lost his Queen at move 19, game went for 38 moves. He also lost his queen in his only other loss (to Naka). Can't be great for his moral ?.. though otherwise he had a good showing - 1 point behind the winner. It *was* an interesting final game though.

Part of me is looking forward to Magnus taking him apart in Chenai (my tip), but part of me hopes it doesnt happen too.

1 2012.04.21 2 4 2811 Zurich Chess Challenge Zuerich SUI 1= Aronian (2820) 1= Kramnik (2801)
2 2011.09.02 4 12 2810 Botvinnik Memorial 2011 Moscow 1. Anand (2817) 2. Aronian (2807), ...
3 2008.08.03 2 4 2787 13th GrenkeLeasing Rapid Mainz GER 1. Anand (2798) 2. Carlsen (2775)
4 2013.03.15 8 56 2787 FIDE Candidates London ENG 1= Carlsen (2872) 1= Kramnik (2810), ...
5 2012.09.24 6 30 2781 5th Final Masters Sao Paulo/Bilbao BRA/ESP 1= Carlsen (2843) 1= Caruana (2773), ...
6 2011.09.26 6 30 2780 4th Final Masters Sao Paulo/Bilbao BRA/ESP 1. Carlsen (2823) 2. Ivanchuk (2765), ...
7 2006.10.13 2 4 2778 WCh Playoffs Elista RUS 1. Kramnik (2743) 2. Topalov (2813)
8 2006.09.23 2 12 2778 WCh Elista RUS 1= Topalov (2813) 1= Kramnik (2743)
9 2012.06.08 10 13 2777 Tal Memorial ? 1. GMRadjabov (2784) 2. GMKramnik (2801), ...
10 2012.06.07 10 45 2776 Tal Memorial blitz Moscow 1= Carlsen (2835) 1= Morozevich (2769), ...
11 2011.11.16 10 45 2776 6th Tal Memorial Moscow RUS 1= Carlsen (2826) 1= Aronian (2802), ...
12 2008.10.30 3 6 2774 Trophee CCAS KO Cap d'Agde FRA 1. Carlsen (2786) 2. Ivanchuk (2786), ...
13 2013.02.23 4 12 2772 ZurichChessChallenge 2013 Zurich 1. Caruana (2757) 2. Anand (2780), ...
14 2008.08.01 4 6 2770 13th GrenkeLeasing Rapid Mainz GER 1. Carlsen (2775) 2. Anand (2798), ...
15 2011.03.12 12 66 2770 20th Amber Blindfold Monaco MNC 1. Aronian (2808) 2. Anand (2817), ...
16 2011.03.12 12 66 2770 20th Amber Rapid Monaco MNC 1. Carlsen (2815) 2. Aronian (2808), ...
17 2008.09.02 6 30 2769 Grand Slam Final Bilbao ESP 1. Topalov (2777) 2. Ivanchuk (2781), ...
18 2009.03.14 12 11 2767 18th Amber Rapid Nice FRA 1. Carlsen (2776) 2. Aronian (2750), ...
19 2009.03.14 12 11 2767 18th Amber Blindfold Nice FRA 1. Carlsen (2776) 2. Radjabov (2761), ...
20 2009.09.28 6 10 2767 2nd Pearl Spring Nanjing CHN 1. Carlsen (2772) 2. Topalov (2813), ...
21 2013.05.07 10 45 2766 Norway Supreme Masters Bl Stavanger NOR 1. Karjakin (2767) 2. Carlsen (2868), ...
22 2013.05.08 10 45 2766 Norway Chess 2013 Sandnes, NOR 1. Karjakin (2767) 2. Carlsen (2868), ...
23 2009.11.05 10 45 2764 Tal Memorial Moscow RUS 1. Kramnik (2772) 2. Carlsen (2801), ...
24 2009.02.19 8 14 2764 XXVI SuperGM Linares ESP 1. Carlsen (2776) 2. Aronian (2750), ...
25 2009.05.13 6 10 2761 5th MTel Masters Sofia BUL 1. Carlsen (2770) 2. Shirov (2745), ...

ER
19-05-2013, 12:03 PM
Players, organisers, officials public were very happy with the tournament all round.

According to broadcast comments in the analysis room, they are thinking of establishing this as a yearly event!

Good on you Scandinavians and Norwegians in particular! :clap:

Jesper Norgaard
20-05-2013, 12:08 AM
Found this re ties:

If two players share first place, there will be a 2 game match with the same time control as in the blitz tournament: 4 min + 2 sec increment for each move. If this match ends in a tie, there will be an Armageddon game where white has 5 min+2 sec increments and black has 4 min+2 sec increment with draw odds. If more than two players share first place, there will be a double round robin with the same tiebreak rules as the opening blitz tournament.

which were:

Tiebreak:
A: Sonneborn Berger
B: Most wins
C: Most wins with black
D: Shared place and prizes.

The full regulations are here:
http://norwaychess.com/en/supertournament/regulations-of-the-international-chess-tournament-supreme-masters/

The above is wrong because Sonneborn-Berger was never part of the Blitz tournaments, only the main tournament.

Instead if there were two players on shared first, two Blitz games would be played, and if 1-1 they would play an Armageddon game. However, when Karjakin was the last player to finish his game, the choice was between outright first or shared first with Magnus and Nakamura. If a 3-way tie had occurred, they would have played a Round Robin with the same rules as the first Blitz tournament.

Tiebreak:
A: Most games with black
B: Most wins
C: Most wins with black
D: Coin toss

In this case, if all 3 games were drawn, we would be down to coin toss, who will get first prize (horror!). So how do you split a 3-way tie with coin tosses? I suppose by flipping a coin for each player, and the "odd man out" is the winner, for instance heads-heads-tails, tails is the winner, if tails-heads-tails heads is the winner. If three of the same, repeat the coin toss. I hope they had a very "fair" coin available in Norway, as it seems like an awfully important toss for who gets first prize.

The two losers would then share second and third prize.

Wouldn't Sonneborn-Berger from the original tournament have been a better tiebreak, before actually relying on coin toss? If Karjakin had lost the last round, Magnus and Karjakin would be equal on Berger with 22, while Nakamura on 21. So it would have been a coin toss between Magnus and Karjakin, if the Berger value had been used before coin toss (not in the rules, my example).

Adamski
20-05-2013, 12:12 AM
Huge congratulations to Karjakin. It's not often there days that magnus doesn't win a tournament he is playing in.
Hope Vishy is not too demoralised by dropping 2 Q's as I too want to see a competitive WC match in Chennai.

Kevin Bonham
20-05-2013, 12:37 AM
The full regulations are here:
http://norwaychess.com/en/supertournament/regulations-of-the-international-chess-tournament-supreme-masters/

The above is wrong because Sonneborn-Berger was never part of the Blitz tournaments, only the main tournament.

Ah, OK. Academic now but you are right.

In this case, if all 3 games were drawn, we would be down to coin toss, who will get first prize (horror!). So how do you split a 3-way tie with coin tosses? I suppose by flipping a coin for each player, and the "odd man out" is the winner, for instance heads-heads-tails, tails is the winner, if tails-heads-tails heads is the winner. If three of the same, repeat the coin toss. I hope they had a very "fair" coin available in Norway, as it seems like an awfully important toss for who gets first prize.

That is an interesting question - what method of coin-tossing among 3 players produces the fastest fair resolution?

For yours there is a 3/4 chance of deciding it in 3 tosses, a 3/4*1/4 chance of deciding it in 6 tosses, a 3/4*1/4*1/4 chance of deciding it in 9 tosses. I think this is an average of 4 coin tosses required, which seems very efficient.

But rolling a 6-sided die once is easier. :lol:

peter_parr
20-05-2013, 12:11 PM
The following article was published in the 41st year of my chess column in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 20 May 2013.

Karjakin Wins in Norway
Peter Parr

Sergey Karjakin scored the best result of his life by winning the super grandmaster tournament which attracted seven of the top ten rated players in the world for a prize fund of $ 356,000 in Stavanger, Norway. Karjakin and World no 1 Magnus Carlsen were both born in 1990 and Karjakin became the youngest GM in history at the age of 12 one year younger than Carlsen. Karjakin won his first four games while Carlsen had four draws. Although Karjakin lost to Carlsen in round five he remained in first place throughout the tournament. Wang Hao of China beat Carlsen and World Champion Vishy Anand in the last two rounds.

Aronian,L (2813) - Karjakin,S (2767) [E15] Rd 4
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Nc3 00 8.Bg2 c6 9.e4 d5 10.exd5 cxd5 11.Ne5 Bb7 12.00 Nc6 13.Bf4 Na5 14.Rc1 Ba3 15.Rb1 Bb4 16.Na4 Ne4 17.a3 Be7 18.cxd5 exd5 19.b4 Nc6 20.Rc1 Rc8 21.Bh3 f5 22.f3 Nd6 23.Qd3 Nxe5 24.dxe5 Rxc1 25.Bxc1 Nc4 26.f4 b5 27.Nc3 Qb6+ 28.Rf2 d4 29.Ne2 Rd8 30.Qxf5 d3 31.Qe6+ Kf8 32.Qf5+ Ke8 33.Qxh7 d2 34.Bxd2 Rxd2 35.e6 Rd1+ 36.Bf1 Qxe6 37.Qh5+ Kf8 38.Nc3 Qc6 01

Final scores (10 players, 9 rounds) :- S.Karjakin (RUS 2767,performance 2886) 6 ; M.Carlsen (NOR 2868 perf 2834), H.Nakamura (USA 2775 perf 2843) 5.5 ; P.Svidler (RUS 2769), L.Aronian (ARM 2813), V.Anand (IND 2783) 5, W.Hao (CHN 2743) 4.5, V.Topalov (BUL 2793) 4, T.Radjabov (AZE 2745) 3, J.Hammer (NOR 2608) 1.5.

Adamski
21-05-2013, 01:04 AM
Hammer got hammered. No shark after all.

James Watson
21-05-2013, 12:04 PM
The full regulations are here:
http://norwaychess.com/en/supertournament/regulations-of-the-international-chess-tournament-supreme-masters/

The above is wrong because Sonneborn-Berger was never part of the Blitz tournaments, only the main tournament.

Instead if there were two players on shared first, two Blitz games would be played, and if 1-1 they would play an Armageddon game. However, when Karjakin was the last player to finish his game, the choice was between outright first or shared first with Magnus and Nakamura. If a 3-way tie had occurred, they would have played a Round Robin with the same rules as the first Blitz tournament.

Tiebreak:
A: Most games with black
B: Most wins
C: Most wins with black
D: Coin toss

In this case, if all 3 games were drawn, we would be down to coin toss, who will get first prize (horror!). So how do you split a 3-way tie with coin tosses? I suppose by flipping a coin for each player, and the "odd man out" is the winner, for instance heads-heads-tails, tails is the winner, if tails-heads-tails heads is the winner. If three of the same, repeat the coin toss. I hope they had a very "fair" coin available in Norway, as it seems like an awfully important toss for who gets first prize.

The two losers would then share second and third prize.

Wouldn't Sonneborn-Berger from the original tournament have been a better tiebreak, before actually relying on coin toss? If Karjakin had lost the last round, Magnus and Karjakin would be equal on Berger with 22, while Nakamura on 21. So it would have been a coin toss between Magnus and Karjakin, if the Berger value had been used before coin toss (not in the rules, my example).

I'd like to see them use a roulette wheel giving each player one of the respective thirds:lol: