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peter_parr
18-02-2013, 12:16 PM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 18th February 2013.

Fabiano Caruana (20) and the undefeated World Champion Vishy Anand share the lead in the six player, ten round, Grenke Classic in Baden-Baden, Germany. Naiditsch has played the most decisive encounters with his best game below with a brilliant piece sacrifice on move 21.

Fridman,Daniel (2667) - Naiditsch,Arkadij (2716) [E97] Rd 6
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 00 6.Be2 e5 7.00 Nc6 8.Be3 Ng4 9.Bg5 f6 10.Bh4 g5 11.Bg3 Nh6 12.dxe5 fxe5 13.h3 Kh8 14.c5 g4 15.hxg4 Bxg4 16.cxd6 cxd6 17.Nd2 Bc8 18.Nc4 Nd4 19.Ne3 Nf7 20.Nc2 Ng5 21.Bd3 Ndf3+ ! 22.gxf3 Qd7 23.Be2 Rf6 24.Nd5! Rh6 25.f4 Nh3+ 26.Kg2 exf4 27.Bh2 f3+! 28.Bxf3 Ng5 29.Nf4 Rxh2+! 30.Kxh2 Be5 31.Kg2 Bxf4 32.Rh1 Qg7 33.Kf1 Be6 34.Nd4 Bc4+ 35.Be2 Nxe4 36.Bxc4 Nd2+ 37.Ke2 d5 (stronger than the obvious 37.. Nxc4) 38.Qc2 Re8+ 39.Kd1 Nxc4 40.Qc3 Re4 41.Nf5 Nxb2+ 42.Kc2 Re2+ 43.Kb3 Qxc3+ 44.Kxc3 Be5+ 45.Nd4 Re4 01

Progress scores after round nine :- F.Caruana (ITA 2757) and V.Anand (IND 2780) 5.5 , M.Adams (ENG 2725), G.Meier (GER 2640) 4.5, A.Naiditsch (GER 2716) 4, D.Fridman (GER 2667) 3.

STOP PRESS: Final scores Anand 6: Caruana 6.

Jesper Norgaard
18-02-2013, 03:31 PM
The Grenken tournament in Baden-Baden was pretty close:

Anand wins outright with +3 (out of 10 games!) and Fridman in the cellar is on -3:


1. Anand *** 1 1 1
2. Caruana *** 0 1 1 1
3. Adams 1 *** 0
4. Meier 0 *** 0 1 1
5. Naiditsch 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 *** 1
6. Fridman 0 0 0 ***


For a thought experiment, I converted two of Naiditches games from a loss to a draw against Anand and Caruana, and then made Anand lose instead of win against Fridman. Finally I converted one of Caruana's draws against Fridman to a loss. This suddenly gives a 6-player tie for first place:



1. Anand *** () 1 (0)
2. Caruana *** 0 1 () 1 (0)
3. Adams 1 *** 0
4. Meier 0 *** 0 1 1
5. Naiditsch ()0 () 0 1 1 0 *** 1
6. Fridman (1) (1) 0 0 ***


Removing parenthesis and applying the closest match to the actual tie break (Most Wins/Most Black Wins/Direct Encounter)


Double Round Robin (10 rounds) (Unplayed games: 0/60 = 0.00%)
Combined tie break Final Standing:
5. Naiditsch 0 0 1 1 0 *** 1 3.00 place : 1 score: 5 [Most Wins]
2. Caruana *** 0 1 1 0 2.00 0.00 5.02 place : 2 score: 5 [Direct Encounter]
4. Meier 0 *** 0 1 1 2.00 0.00 5.02 place : 3 score: 5 [Direct Encounter]
6. Fridman 1 1 0 0 *** 2.00 0.00 5.02 place : 4 score: 5 [Direct Encounter]
1. Anand *** 1 0 1.00 0.00 5.01 place : 5 score: 5 [Direct Encounter]
3. Adams 1 *** 0 1.00 0.00 5.01 place : 6 score: 5 [Direct Encounter]

Combined statistics:
1. Most Wins
2. Most Blacks
3. Direct Encounter


Suddenly this makes Naiditsch the winner of the tournament! Well sort of.

The tie break defined for the tournament would probably invalidate all of the ties above because they all happen in first place. I wonder what they would have done with a 6-fold tie?

This is the short and undetailed definition on the web site:
================================================== ==============================================
Tiebreakers (except for first place): number of wins, wins with Black, head-to-head score

Only for a tie for 1st place: a play-off with 2 games at 10 min + 2 sec/move; then if scores remain tied, 2 games at 5 min + 2 sec/move; if still equal an Armageddon game will be played at 6 min for White vs. 5 min for Black + 2 sec/move (in case of a draw the player with Black wins the tournament)
================================================== ===============================================

I don't like this tie break at all. First of all number of wins (indifferent), then wins with Black (why is getting more points with Black better, since you are getting less points with White?), and then Direct Encounter. To me there is nothing wrong with Berger tie score in this type of tournament (although for a 6-way tie it probably wouldn't matter). Then there is also no definition of who will get Black in the Armageddon game! I suppose a coin toss? Which would make the Black player pretty favorable with 6 vs. 5 min. and 2 sec/move.

So what happens if more than 2 people gets in first place? There is nothing defined in the tournament site. This is handled much better on the FIDE web site about playoff, and also in the ACF Junior Tournament definition. I Suppose for a 6-way tie they would make a knockout with much the same rules as for 2 players, then with the remaining 3 players ... perhaps a Round Robin with matches, and if they are won/lost evenly between the players, perhaps a coin toss who is eliminated? Then a final match with the 2 remaining players. Probably I am just hallucinating since the rules are not really saying *anything* about how to handle even a simple tie between 3 players.

In Gibraltar I think they had a 5-way tie one year, and the tournament director wanted to change rules after the experience. I wonder if they will keep these rules for next years "Grenken" tournament?

peter_parr
25-02-2013, 12:12 PM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 25th February 2013.

Anand Wins Grenke Classic
Peter Parr

World Champion Viswanathan Anand won the Grenke Classic in Baden-Baden, Germany. Fabiano Caruana was a full point ahead of Anand with two rounds to play. Anand ,the Tiger from Madras, struck out and defeated the two tail-enders but Caruana lost to Michael Adams and drew with Daniel Fridman.

Caruana,F (2757) - Meier,G (2640) [C10]
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.Be3 Nd5 8.Bd2 c5 9.Bb5+ Bd7 10.Bxd7+ Qxd7 11.c4 Nb6 12.Rc1 f6 13.00 cxd4 14.Re1 Rc8 15.Qb3 Be7 16.c5 Rxc5 17.Rxc5 Bxc5 18.Rxe6+ Kd8 19.Re1 Qd5 20.Qd3 (all opening theory ) 20...Nd7 21.b4 Bb6 22.a4 a6 ? 23.a5 Ba7 24.Bf4! Nb8 25.Bxb8 Bxb8 26.Nxd4 Qd6 27.Ne6+ Ke7 28.Nc5+ Kf7 29.Qc4+ Kg6 30.g3 h5 31.Qe4+ Kh6 32.Qxb7 Qd2 33.Re7 Qd1+ 34.Kg2 h4 35.Qd7 Bd6 36.Ne4 10

Final scores (6 players, 10 rounds):- V.Anand (IND 2780) 6.5: F.Caruana (ITA 2757) 6: M.Adams (ENG 2725) and G.Meier (GER 2640) 5: A.Naiditsch (GER 2716) 4: D.Fridman (GER 2667) 3.5. Etienne Bacrot (FRA 2704) won the supporting open event with 7/9. Anand has been the undisputed World Champion since 2007 and has been ranked in the top ten since April 1991. Anand rarely loses but draws too many games. Anand (43) last won a tournament in March 2008 at Linares, Spain and is currently rated no 6 in the world at 2780 well below No 1 Magnus Carlsen (NOR) at 2861.