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Garrett
17-01-2013, 05:30 PM
from Chessbase

from March 14 to April 1st the candidates tournament will be staged in London. The eight participants, headed by Magnus Carlsen, Vladimir Kramnik, Levon Aronian, and Teimour Radjabov, will play a double round robin to determine the challenger for the World Championship title, currently held by Viswanathan Anand.

Kevin Bonham
17-01-2013, 05:46 PM
Poll added for those who wish to vote early, vote often.

Adamski
17-01-2013, 11:38 PM
Hard to see Magnus being beaten here, but you never know...

MichaelBaron
24-01-2013, 01:16 PM
Will be annoying for Magnus if he somehow does not win

peter_parr
11-02-2013, 11:16 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 11th February 2013.

The World Championship Candidates Tournament is an eight player double round-robin to be held from 14 March to 1 April for a prize fund of $660,000 in London.

The top four world rated players - M.Carlsen NOR 2872, V.Kramnik RUS 2810, L.Aronian ARM 2809, T.Radjabov AZE 2793 are joined by the three qualifiers from the 2011 World Cup - A.Grischuk RUS 2764, V.Ivanchuk UKR 2758, P.Svidler RUS 2747 and B.Gelfand ISR 2740 the last world title challenger. The winner will play a World Title Match in November 2013 against Viswanathan Anand (IND 2780) who has been World Champion since 2007.

Geelong Grizzle
12-02-2013, 12:45 AM
In an unconfirmed report from Norway last night, modest Magnus says he won't be too perturbed if he doesn't win, but then stunned journalists by adding, "I could beat those other 7 patzers with my eyes closed. Give me the first prize already!" :)

ER
12-02-2013, 03:12 PM
go Ivanchuk!

Adamski
12-02-2013, 10:52 PM
go Ivanchuk!
Yes, go Chukky! He is a Chelsea fan!

ER
13-02-2013, 02:37 AM
Yes, go Chukky! He is a Chelsea fan!

if so, he obviously tries for some solace in chess! :P :)

peter_parr
11-03-2013, 10:07 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 11th March 2013.

The eight player World Championship candidates tournament will start on Friday in London. The top four seeds :- M.Carlsen (NOR 2872), V.Kramnik (RUS 2810), L.Aronian (ARM 2809) and T.Radjabov (AZE 2793) are the four highest rated players in the world.

Max Illingworth
14-03-2013, 12:00 AM
With the tournament starting in just a couple of days, naturally a lot of chess fans have made their predictions (http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/fide-candidates-predictions)

I think Carlsen has the best chance of winning the tournament, because he is the strongest player overall. But any of these players can be the strongest player on a given day, making it possible for anyone to win.

pax
14-03-2013, 05:02 PM
Perhaps I'm a little old-fashioned, but I'm looking forward to the possibility that the unambiguously strongest player in the world can also be the world champion for a change.

Kevin Bonham
14-03-2013, 05:11 PM
Perhaps I'm a little old-fashioned, but I'm looking forward to the possibility that the unambiguously strongest player in the world can also be the world champion for a change.

Same here, if that occurs.

If it doesn't he will only have himself to blame as this is pretty close to the system he wanted.

Carl Gorka
14-03-2013, 07:56 PM
Go Aronian! :D (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/london-candidates-2013.html)

Carl Gorka
14-03-2013, 08:33 PM
Agon's old site (http://www.worldchess.com/candidates/index.html) seems to be redundant, while the FIDE site (http://london2013.fide.com/) looks official. However, just to throw us off our guard a bit more, Agon appear to have a new site (http://candidates2013.com/) :D

ER
14-03-2013, 09:42 PM
Agon's old site (http://www.worldchess.com/candidates/index.html) seems to be redundant, while the FIDE site (http://london2013.fide.com/) looks official. However, just to throw us off our guard a bit more, Agon appear to have a new site (http://candidates2013.com/) :D


I will be following this one!

http://london2013.fide.com/en/component/content/article/40-static-content/133-live-games

Kevin Bonham
14-03-2013, 10:16 PM
London is 11 hours behind us so looks like games start from 1 am (sigh) tomorrow night. 3 days on, one day off is the schedule.

ER
15-03-2013, 11:08 AM
GO CHUK!

I mean Vassily because Alexander (an old favourite of mine) is a Chuk too although I am sure he thinks more of stupid poker when he plays chess!

What a waste, but if as they say he makes lots of money from poker good luck to him!

I wish Moro was playing too but ...

Kevin Bonham
15-03-2013, 10:20 PM
Aronian - Carlsen
Gelfand - Radjabov
Ivanchuk - Grischuk
Svidler - Kramnik

Carl Gorka
15-03-2013, 10:32 PM
I've just realised that this tournament starts on Red Nose Day in the UK, and finishes on April Fool's Day.

Agon and FIDE are starting their re-branding of chess it would seem :D

Adamski
15-03-2013, 11:22 PM
Lev starts with an easy game I see....

Tony Dowden
15-03-2013, 11:29 PM
Carlsen to win :cool:

Having nailed my colours to the mast, the start - especially the Aronian-Carlsen and Carlsen-Karmnik match-ups in Rds 1-2 - could be fascinating. Will Carlsen start slowly, even weakly, and make the event a cliff-hanger or will he get the jump on Aronian & Kramnik and storm to an early and quickly insurmountable lead?

Kevin Bonham
15-03-2013, 11:32 PM
Carlsen :cool: (dunno why the poll is closed when the event hasn't started)

I don't know why it's showing as closed for you when it isn't showing as closed for me! On my screen it says it closes at 6:46 pm. In your case does it actually say "This poll is closed?" If so that's rather odd. Is anyone else seeing that?

Tony Dowden
15-03-2013, 11:38 PM
I don't know why it's showing as closed for you when it isn't showing as closed for me! On my screen it says it closes at 6:46 pm. In your case does it actually say "This poll is closed?" If so that's rather odd. Is anyone else seeing that?

Maybe I had a senior moment or the warm Brisbane evening addled my brain, as I've now duly voted and joined the massive Carlsen fan club.

[BTW, I missed not playing in the Tassie Ch'p. It would have been fun to give Neil a bit more competition]

Kevin Bonham
16-03-2013, 07:12 AM
All draws.

Tony Dowden
16-03-2013, 09:39 AM
All draws.

Probably a slight edge to Carlsen after Rd 1 - given he's drawn with Black in one of his toughest two games on paper (the other being Kramnik-Carlsen in Rd 9)

Desmond
16-03-2013, 11:14 AM
Probably a slight edge to Carlsen after Rd 1 - given he's drawn with Black in one of his toughest two games on paper (the other being Kramnik-Carlsen in Rd 9)
I'm sure Aronian is happy with =1st after playing Carlsen.

ER
16-03-2013, 12:01 PM
Maybe I had a senior moment or the warm Brisbane evening addled my brain, as I've now duly voted and joined the massive Carlsen fan club.

[BTW, I missed not playing in the Tassie Ch'p. It would have been fun to give Neil a bit more competition]

Hi Tony, apologies for not responding to your shouts last night but I was away from the computer since after demolishing a few grilled lamb chops and some mash potato, I fell asleep!

Kevin Bonham
16-03-2013, 10:36 PM
round 2

Carlsen - Kramnik
Grischuk - Svidler
Radjabov - Ivanchuk
Aronian - Gelfand

ER
16-03-2013, 10:57 PM
GO CHUKIE!!! you can beat this kid with Black too!
Remember what you did to him in the FIDE World Cup at Khanty-Mansiysk in 2011!

Kevin Bonham
17-03-2013, 12:38 AM
Chucky is attempting the Leningrad Dutch and moves are not being made in a hurry!

The game viewers at http://candidates2013.worldchess.com/#game-view are strange. I can't find a way to play through the game up to that point on them.

Kevin Bonham
17-03-2013, 09:54 AM
Aronian - Gelfand. Really this sort of tactic is nice but a bit obvious at this level.

1.Nf3 c5 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 g6 4.e3 Nf6 5.d4 cxd4 6.exd4 d5 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Qb3 Nxc3 9.Bc4 Nd5 10.Bxd5 e6 11.Bxc6+ bxc6 12.0-0 Be7 13.Be3 Qd5 14.Rfc1 Qxb3 15.axb3 Bb7 16.Ne5 0-0 17.Ra4 Rfd8 18.Nc4 Bf6 19.Na5 Rd7 20.Rb4 Ba6 21.Nxc6 Rb7 22.h3 Kg7 23.Rxb7 Bxb7 24.Ne5 Bd8 25.b4 Rc8? 26.Bh6+! Kg8 27.Rxc8 Bxc8 28.Nc6 Bf6 29.b5 Bd7 30.g4 g5 31.h4 gxh4 32.g5 Bxc6 33.bxc6 Bd8 34.Kg2 Bc7 35.Kh3 1-0

Radjabov- Ivanchuk

1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 f5 4.Nc3 Nf6 5.g3 Bg7 6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 c6 8.Rb1 Ne4 9.Qc2 Nxc3 10.bxc3 e5 11.dxe5 dxe5 12.Ba3 Rf7 13.Rfd1 Qe8 14.e4 f4 15.Rd3 fxg3 16.hxg3 Na6 17.Ng5 Rc7 18.Bd6 Bf6 19.Qd2 Rd7 20.Bh3 Rg7 21.Bxe5 Bxe5 22.Rd8 Bxh3 23.Rxe8+ Rxe8 24.Nxh3 Nc5 25.Qe3 Bd6 26.f3 Ne6 27.Kg2 g5 28.Nf2 h5 29.Qxa7 Bc5 30.Qa4 Rf8 31.Nd3 h4 32.Qa5 b6 33.Rxb6 Bxb6 34.Qxb6 hxg3 Flag 1-0

Grischuk - Svidler

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.a4 b4 9.d4 d6 10.dxe5 dxe5 11.Nbd2 Bc5 12.Qe2 Qe7 13.Nc4 Bg4 14.c3 bxc3 15.bxc3 h6 16.Bc2 Qe6 17.Ne3 Bxe3 18.Qxe3 Na5 19.Nd2 Qc6 20.h3 Be6 21.Qg3 Nd7 22.Rb1 Rfb8 23.Ba3 Nc4 24.Nxc4 Qxc4 25.Bb4 a5 26.Bd3 Qa2 27.Ra1 Qd2 28.Red1 Qf4 29.Qxf4 exf4 30.Be7 Re8 31.Ba3 Bb3 32.Bb5 Bxd1 33.Bxd7 Bc2 34.Bxe8 Rxe8 35.f3 Rd8 36.Be7 Rd7 37.Bh4 g5 38.Be1 Rd1 39.Rxd1 Bxd1 40.c4 Bxa4 41.Bxa5 1/2-1/2

Carlsen - Kramnik.

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e6 6.Bf4 d5 7.e3 Bb4 8.Be2 dxc4 9.Nxc6 Qxd1+ 10.Rxd1 bxc6 11.Bxc4 Nd5 12.0-0 Nxf4 13.exf4 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Ke7 15.Rb1 Bd7 16.Rb7 Rhb8 17.Rfb1 Rxb7 18.Rxb7 a5 19.Bd3 h6 20.h4 Kd8 21.Kf1 Kc8 22.Rb1 Rb8 23.Rxb8+ Kxb8 24.Ke2 Kc7 25.Ke3 Kd6 26.Kd4 c5+ 27.Ke3 Bc6 28.g3 f6 29.a3 e5 30.fxe5+ Kxe5 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
17-03-2013, 07:51 PM
Gelfand - Carlsen
Ivanchuk - Aronian
Sivdler - Radjabov
Kramnik - Grischuk

Grischuk joked yesterday that his draw with Svidler had ruined Svidler's tournament strategy, which was to beat Grischuk twice (Grischuk has a bad record against him) and draw with everyone else!

ER
17-03-2013, 08:00 PM
Grischuk joked yesterday that his draw with Svidler had ruined Svidler's tournament strategy, which was to beat Grischuk twice (Grischuk has a bad record against him) and draw with everyone else!

:D Good humour on behalf of Alexander! I am sure Svidler who's always the first to share a joke and pull someone's leg had a good response to that!

ER
17-03-2013, 09:10 PM
:D Good humour on behalf of Alexander! I am sure Svidler who's always the first to share a joke and pull someone's leg had a good response to that!

As expected he did using Baldrick's famous phrase to Blackadder:
"I have a cunning plan, my lord"! :lol:

peter_parr
18-03-2013, 10:09 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 18th March 2013.

Wins for Radjabov and Aronian
Peter Parr

Teimour Radjabov and Levon Aronian have taken the early lead by winning their second round games in the World Championship Candidates tournament in London.

T.Radjabov 2793 v V.Ivanchuk 2757 A88
1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 f5 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. g3 Bg7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Rb1 Ne4 9. Qc2 Nxc3 10. bxc3 e5 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Ba3 Rf7 13. Rfd1 Qe8 14. e4 f4 15. Rd3 fxg3 16. hxg3 Na6 17. Ng5 Rc7 18. Bd6 Bf6 19. Qd2 Rd7 20. Bh3 Rg7 21. Bxe5 Bxe5 22. Rd8 Bxh3 23. Rxe8+ Rxe8 24. Nxh3 Nc5 25. Qe3 Bd6 26. f3 Ne6 27. Kg2 g5 28. Nf2 h5 29. Qxa7 Bc5 30. Qa4 Rf8 31. Nd3 h4 32. Qa5 b6 33. Rxb6 Bxb6 34. Qxb6 hxg3 1-0

Aronian won a bishop and pawn endgame against Boris Gelfand. The other six games from the first two rounds were all drawn. Magnus Carlsen, the favourite, drew against his two main rivals Kramnik and Aronian. Vladimir Kramnik was black in his first two games. Scores after two rounds ( 8 players, 14 rounds) :- L.Aronian (ARM 2809 world no 3), T.Radjabov (AZE 2793 world no 4) 1.5 ; M.Carlsen (NOR 2872 world no 1), V.Kramnik (RUS 2810 world no 2), A.Grischuk (RUS 2764), P.Svidler (RUS 2747) all 1 ; V.Ivanchuk (UKR 2757), B.Gelfand (ISR 2740) 0.5.

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2013, 10:23 AM
Three, yes three, decisive games last night, though partly because a couple of people don't seem to be playing very well.

Svidler - Radjabov

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0-0 6.Be3 c5 7.Nge2 Nc6 8.d5 Na5 9.Ng3 a6 10.Be2 Nd7 11.Rc1 b5 12.cxb5 axb5 13.Bxb5 Ne5 14.0-0 Nac4 15.Bg5 Bd7 16.Bxd7 Qxd7 17.Qe2 Nxb2 18.Qxb2 Nd3 19.Qd2 Nxc1 20.Rxc1 Bxc3 21.Rxc3 Rfb8 22.Qc2 f6 23.Bc1 Qa4 24.a3 Kf7 25.Nf1 Qxc2 26.Rxc2 f5 27.Nd2 Ra4 28.Nc4 fxe4 29.fxe4 Rb3 30.Kf2 Ke8 31.e5 Ra6 32.exd6 exd6 33.Ke2 Kd7 34.Bf4 h5 35.h4 Ra4 36.Kd2 Rb1 37.Kc3 Ra6 38.Re2 Rd1 39.Re6 Rxd5 40.Rxg6 Rd4 41.Bxd6 Rxh4 42.Ne5+ Kc8 43.Rg8+ Kb7 44.Bxc5 Re6 45.Rg7+ Kc8 46.Nc4 Rg4 47.Nd6+ Kb8 48.Rb7+ Ka8 49.Rd7 Rg8 50.Nc4 Rxg2 51.Bd6 Rxd6 52.Nxd6 h4 53.Rh7 Rh2 54.Kb4 h3 55.Ka5 1-0

Kramnik - Grischuk

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 d5 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.Nf3 Nb6 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.e3 0-0 9.0-0 Re8 10.h3 e5 11.d5 Na5 12.Qc2 c6 13.b4 Nac4 14.dxc6 bxc6 15.Rd1 Qe7 16.Nd2 Bf5 17.Nce4 Rad8 18.a3 h5 19.Nxc4 Rxd1+ 20.Qxd1 Nxc4 21.Ra2 Rd8 22.Qf1 Nd6 23.Nc5 Nb5 24.Bxc6 Nc3 25.Rd2 Rxd2 26.Bxd2 Qd6 27.Bxc3 Qxc6 28.Qg2 Qd6 29.e4 Qd1+ 30.Kh2 Bc8 31.f3 Qc1 32.Qd2 Qf1 33.Qg2 Qc1 34.Qd2 Qf1 35.Qg2 1/2-1/2

Gelfand - Carlsen

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Nbd7 5.Bg5 c6 6.e3 Qa5 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Rc1 Nxc3 9.bxc3 Ba3 10.Rc2 b6 11.Bd3 Ba6 12.0-0 Bxd3 13.Qxd3 0-0 14.e4 Rfe8 15.e5 h6 16.Bh4 c5 17.Nd2 cxd4 18.cxd4 Rac8 19.Nc4 Qb5 20.f4 Rc7 21.Qxa3 Rxc4 22.Rxc4 Qxc4 23.Bf2 Qc7 24.Rc1 Qb7 25.Qd6 Nf8 26.g3 Rc8 27.Rxc8 Qxc8 28.d5 exd5 29.Qxd5 g6 30.Kg2 Ne6 31.Qf3 Kg7 32.a3 h5 33.h4 Qc2 34.Qb7 Qa4 35.Qf3 b5 36.f5 gxf5 37.Qxf5 Qxa3 38.Qxh5 a5 39.Qg4+ Kf8 40.h5 Qc1 41.Qe4 b4 42.Be3 Qc7 43.Qa8+ Kg7 44.h6+ Kh7 45.Qe4+ Kg8 46.Qa8+ Qd8 47.Qxd8+ Nxd8 48.Kf3 a4 49.Ke4 Nc6 50.Bc1 Na5 51.Bd2 b3 52.Kd3 Nc4 53.Bc3 a3 54.g4 Kh7 55.g5 Kg6 56.Bd4 b2 57.Kc2 Nd2 0-1

Ivanchuk - Aronian

1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 e6 3.Nd2 c5 4.e3 b6 5.Ngf3 Bb7 6.c3 Be7 7.Bd3 0-0 8.Bxf6 Bxf6 9.h4 Nc6 10.Ng5 g6 11.f4 Ne7 12.Qg4 h5 13.Qh3 cxd4 14.exd4 b5 15.a3 Qb6 16.Rg1 Nd5 17.Nge4 Bg7 18.Qf3 b4 19.axb4 Nxb4 20.Nc4 Qb5 21.Ne5 Nxd3+ 22.Nxd3 Qf5 23.Ndc5 Bc6 24.b4 Rfb8 25.Ra5 a6 26.Qe3 Qg4 27.g3 Rb5 28.Rxa6 Rxa6 29.Nxa6 e5 30.dxe5 Bxe4 31.c4 Rb6 32.Qxb6 Qf3 33.Qf2 Qa3 34.Nc5 Flag, again 0-1

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2013, 10:49 AM
Standings

2.5 Aronian
2 Carlsen, Svidler
1.5 Kramnik, Grischuk, Radjabov
0.5 Gelfand, Ivanchuk

Rest day tonight.

Carl Gorka
18-03-2013, 05:25 PM
"I tend to do things like this and friends tell me I'm a coffee house player (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/a-coffee-house-player.html)" -Aronian on Ivanchuk's play :D

Adamski
18-03-2013, 08:59 PM
Hope Chukky picks up his performance. After alll he is a Chelsea supporter.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2013, 12:11 AM
Gelfand - Ivanchuk
Aronian - Svidler
Carlsen - Grischuk
Radjabov - Kramnik

Tony Dowden
20-03-2013, 07:53 AM
Hi Tony, apologies for not responding to your shouts last night but I was away from the computer since after demolishing a few grilled lamb chops and some mash potato, I fell asleep!

No worries JaK :)

Tony Dowden
20-03-2013, 07:55 AM
Hope Chukky picks up his performance. After alll he is a Chelsea supporter.

If he wants to do better he should support Real Madrid like Carlsen does ;)

Tony Dowden
20-03-2013, 08:01 AM
Gelfand - Ivanchuk 0.5-0.5
Aronian - Svidler 0.5-0.5
Carlsen - Grischuk 1-0
Radjabov - Kramnik 0.5
[Results added]

Magnus Carlsen eases into a shared lead with Levon Aronian after a no-risk start and looking very very good. Carlsen typically gets stronger through an event so it will be fascinating to see if Aronian or anyone else can serious challenge him.

The poll results for this thread are interesting. Like nearly everyone else I voted for Carlsen but surely Aronian has almost as much chance of winning the event (being largely uninterested in mathematics I don't know about a number but it must be more than half as much as Carlsen).

Qbert
20-03-2013, 09:34 AM
[Results added]

The poll results for this thread are interesting. Like nearly everyone else I voted for Carlsen but surely Aronian has almost as much chance of winning the event (being largely uninterested in mathematics I don't know about a number but it must be more than half as much as Carlsen).
Their respective expected scores on rating are 9 and 7.5 points, so given that Carlsen has performed at a levl of 8.5 or better for the last year, I'd say the votes are about right. Of course, anything can happen :)

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2013, 10:23 AM
Aronian - Svidler. Svidler draws easily as a result of lots of good preparation work.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 a6 4.e3 b5 5.a4 Bb7 6.b3 e6 7.bxc4 bxc4 8.Bxc4 Nf6 9.Nbd2 Nbd7 10.Rb1 Rb8 11.0-0 Be7 12.Qe2 0-0 13.Bb2 c5 14.Bxa6 Bxa6 15.Qxa6 Ra8 16.Qb5 Ra5 17.Qb3 Qa8 18.Ra1 Rb8 19.Qc2 cxd4 20.Nxd4 Rc8 21.Qb1 Rxa4 22.Rxa4 Qxa4 23.Rc1 Qa6 24.Rxc8+ Qxc8 25.h3 h6 26.Qc2 Qxc2 27.Nxc2 Nd5 28.Ba3 Bxa3 29.Nxa3 Nc5 30.Nc2 Kf8 31.Kf1 1/2-1/2

Carlsen - Grischuk. Apparently black was OK until 17...f5 which allowed white to make the f8 bishop very bad. Grischuk soon got into terrible time trouble and Carlsen refuted his attack.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d3 Bc5 5.c3 0-0 6.0-0 d6 7.h3 a6 8.Bxc6 bxc6 9.Re1 Re8 10.Nbd2 d5 11.exd5 Qxd5 12.Nb3 Bf8 13.c4 Qd6 14.Be3 Nd7 15.d4 e4 16.Nfd2 a5 17.a4 f5 18.c5 Qg6 19.Nc4 Nf6 20.Bf4 Nd5 21.Qd2 Be6 22.Nbxa5 Reb8 23.Ne5 Qf6 24.Bh2 Rxa5 25.Qxa5 Rxb2 26.Rab1 Ra2 27.Qa6 e3 28.fxe3 Qg5 29.Re2 Nxe3 30.Nf3 Qg6 31.Rxa2 Bxa2 32.Rb2 Bc4 33.Qa5 Bd5 34.Qe1 f4 35.Bxf4 Nc2 36.Qf2 Bxf3 37.Rxc2 1-0

Gelfand - Ivanchuk. A wild game that ends in a piece sac resulting in a perpetual.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nf3 Bg4 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bf4 Bxf3 6.gxf3 Bb4 7.e3 Nge7 8.Qc2 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Nd5 10.Bg3 h5 11.h3 Qd7 12.0-0-0 0-0-0 13.Ne4 Kb8 14.Kb1 h4 15.Bh2 Bd6 16.f4 f5 17.Ng5 Na5 18.Be2 Rc8 19.Qd2 Bb4 20.Qd3 c5 21.dxc5 Rxc5 22.e4 Rhc8 23.Rc1 Nc4 24.Rxc4 Rxc4 25.exd5 exd5 26.Qb3 Qc6 27.Bxc4 dxc4 28.Qf3 Qb5 29.Qe2 Re8 30.Qc2 c3 31.bxc3 Bxc3+ 32.Qb3 Qd3+ 33.Qc2 Qb5+ 34.Qb3 Qd3+ 35.Qc2 Qb5+ 1/2-1/2

Radjabov - Kramnik was drawn; I haven't got the PGN yet.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2013, 10:40 AM
Standings

3 Aronian, Carlsen
2.5 Svidler
2 Kramnik Radjabov
1.5 Grischuk
1 Gelfand, Ivanchuk

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2013, 01:43 PM
Apparently 25...Rc2 wins in some incredibly obscure sense in Gelfand-Ivanchuk.

Kevin Bonham
21-03-2013, 12:15 AM
Round 5

Ivanchuk - Carlsen
Svidler - Gelfand
Kramnik - Aronian
Grischuk - Radjabov

Adamski
21-03-2013, 06:12 AM
Round 5

Ivanchuk - Carlsen
Svidler - Gelfand
Kramnik - Aronian
Grischuk - Radjabov
More draws.

Kevin Bonham
21-03-2013, 08:20 AM
Yep, all drawn though not without interest.

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.20"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Ivanchuk,V"]
[Black "Carlsen,M"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2757"]
[BlackElo "2872"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D93"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bf4 Bg7 5. Nf3 O-O 6. e3 c5 7. dxc5 Qa5 8.
Rc1 Rd8 9. Qa4 Qxc5 10. b4 Qc6 11. Qa3 dxc4 12. b5 Qb6 13. Bxc4 Be6 14.
Bxe6 Qxe6 15. O-O Nbd7 16. Ng5 Qf5 17. Qxe7 Nh5 18. Rfd1 Nxf4 19. exf4 Bf8
20. Qe4 Qxe4 21. Ncxe4 Nb6 22. g3 Rxd1+ 23. Rxd1 Be7 24. Nf3 Rc8 25. Ne5
Rc7 26. Kg2 f6 27. Nf3 Kf7 28. h4 Rc2 29. a4 Ra2 30. Nc3 Ra3 31. Rc1 Nxa4
32. Ne4 Rd3 33. Rc7 Ke6 34. Rxb7 Rd7 35. Rb8 Rd8 36. Rb7 Rd7 37. Rxd7 Kxd7
38. Nd4 f5 39. Ng5 Bxg5 40. fxg5 Nc3 41. h5 gxh5 42. Kh3 Kd6 43. Kh4 Kd5
44. Nxf5 Nxb5 45. Kxh5 Ke4 46. Ne3 Nd6 47. Kh6 Nf7+ 48. Kxh7 Nxg5+ 49. Kg6
Nh3 50. Nd1 Kf3 51. Kf5 Nxf2 52. Nxf2 Kxg3 53. Nd1 a5 54. Ke4 a4 55. Kd4 a3
56. Nc3 a2 57. Nxa2 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.20"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Svidler,P"]
[Black "Gelfand,B"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2747"]
[BlackElo "2740"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D85"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bd2 Nb6 6. e3 Bg7 7. f4 O-O 8.
Nf3 Bg4 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 c6 11. h4 N8d7 12. h5 e6 13. hxg6 hxg6 14. e4
f5 15. g4 Nf6 16. gxf5 exf5 17. e5 Ng4 18. d5 cxd5 19. O-O-O d4 20. Nb5 Qd5
21. Qh3 Rfc8+ 22. Kb1 Rc6 23. e6 Qxe6 24. Bg2 Nf2 25. Qh7+ Kf7 26. Rde1 Qf6
27. Bxc6 bxc6 28. Nc7 Rh8 29. Qxh8 Bxh8 30. Ne8 Nxh1 31. Nxf6 Ng3 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.20"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Kramnik,V"]
[Black "Aronian,L"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2810"]
[BlackElo "2809"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "A07"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Bg4 3. Bg2 e6 4. c4 c6 5. O-O Nf6 6. cxd5 Bxf3 7. Bxf3 cxd5
8. Nc3 Nc6 9. d4 Be7 10. e3 O-O 11. Bd2 Qb8 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Bg2 b5 14. e4
b4 15. Bf4 Qb6 16. Na4 Qa5 17. e5 Nd7 18. Be3 Nb6 19. Nxb6 axb6 20. f4 Qxa2
21. f5 exf5 22. b3 Qa5 23. Qf3 Nd8 24. Qxd5 Rxc1 25. Rxc1 Qxd5 26. Bxd5 Ra5
27. Bf3 Ra3 28. Rc8 Rxb3 29. Kf2 Rc3 30. Rb8 b3 31. Rxb6 g5 32. Rb8 Rc4 33.
d5 Rb4 34. Rxb4 Bxb4 35. Bd1 b2 36. Bc2 Nb7 37. Bxg5 Nc5 38. Bxf5 Na4 39.
d6 Nc3 40. d7 Ba5 41. Ke3 f6 42. Bxf6 Nd5+ 43. Kd4 Nxf6 44. exf6 Kf7 45.
Bxh7 Kxf6 46. Kd5 Ke7 47. Kc6 Kd8 48. g4 Be1 49. h3 Bh4 50. Kd6 Be7+ 51.
Ke6 Bh4 52. Bb1 Kc7 53. Be4 Kd8 54. Bc2 Kc7 55. Bb1 Kd8 56. Be4 Kc7 57. Bd3
Kd8 58. Kd6 Be7+ 59. Ke6 Bh4 60. Bf5 Kc7 61. Kf7 b1=Q 62. Bxb1 Kxd7 63. Ba2
Kd6 64. Kg6 Ke5 65. Kh5 Be7 66. g5 Kf4 67. h4 Kg3 68. Bc4 Bf8 69. Be2 Bg7
70. Bc4 Bf8 71. g6 Kf4 72. Ba2 Bg7 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.20"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Grischuk,A"]
[Black "Radjabov,T"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2764"]
[BlackElo "2793"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D37"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 Nh5 8.
Be2 Nxf4 9. exf4 b6 10. b4 a5 11. a3 c6 12. O-O Qc7 13. g3 g6 14. Re1 Ba6
15. Qc2 Bxe2 16. Nxe2 Ra7 17. Rab1 axb4 18. axb4 Rfa8 19. Nc1 Ra3 20. Nd3
Bf6 21. Kg2 Qb7 22. Rec1 Kg7 23. Qd1 b5 24. Nde5 R8a4 25. Rc2 Bd8 26. Qe2
h6 27. Nd3 Nf6 28. Nfe5 Nd7 29. Rcb2 Nxe5 30. dxe5 Qd7 31. Rb3 Be7 32. Ne1
Qa7 33. Nc2 Rxb3 34. Rxb3 Bxc5 35. bxc5 Qxc5 36. Ne3 h5 37. Qc2 Qb6 38. Rb2
Re4 39. Rb1 c5 40. Nd1 Qc6 41. Nc3 Rc4 42. Qd3 b4 43. Ne2 Qa4 44. f5 Qc2
45. Qxc2 Rxc2 46. Nf4 gxf5 47. Nxh5+ Kh6 48. Nf6 Ra2 49. Nd7 Ra5 50. Nxc5
Rxc5 51. Rxb4 d4 1/2-1/2

Qbert
21-03-2013, 02:13 PM
Yep, all drawn though not without interest.

That's where only looking at the final result after the game is over can disguise all the drama. When I tuned in this morning after about 4 hours play the positions were so crazy I though there would be 4 decisive results. But these guys don't give up half-points so easily... :)

James Peirce
22-03-2013, 10:23 AM
What happens in the event of a tie?

pax
22-03-2013, 01:10 PM
I don't think it's too soon to say it's now a two horse race. It could be significant that Carlsen has white against Aronian and against backmarkers Ivanchuk and Gelfand in the 2nd half - though he's obviously pretty comfortable winning with black!

Tony Dowden
22-03-2013, 05:33 PM
Yes, Carlsen and Aronian are +3 after 6 rounds which is 'ridiculous' (as we say rather a lot here in Australia). Just one round ago Nigel Short was doubting more than +4 would be needed to win the event.

Desmond
24-03-2013, 11:29 AM
Position after 7th round:
5 - Carlsen;
4,5 - Aronian;
3,5 - Svidler and Kramnik;
3 - Radjabov;
2,5 - Grischuk, Ivanchuk and Gelfand

pax
24-03-2013, 03:23 PM
Position after 7th round:
5 - Carlsen;
4,5 - Aronian;
3,5 - Svidler and Kramnik;
3 - Radjabov;
2,5 - Grischuk, Ivanchuk and Gelfand

There's a game missing: Aronian-Grischuk.

5 - Carlsen and Aronian;
3,5 - Svidler and Kramnik;
3 - Radjabov and Grischuk;
2,5 - Ivanchuk and Gelfand.

peter_parr
25-03-2013, 10:03 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 25th March 2013.

Carlsen and Aronian lead in London
Peter Parr

The World Championship Candidates Tournament in London has reached the half-way stage with Magnus Carlsen and Levon Aronian in the joint lead with three wins and four draws each. The winner will play a match for the world championship against title-holder Viswanathan Anand of India later this year.

Carlsen was in a very difficult position and short of time in round seven against World no 4 Teimour Radjabov but he defended well with the game ending in a draw by triple repetition of position. The two leaders are well clear of the field with no other player above 50% ( former World Champion Vladimir Kramnik has drawn all seven games) and six times Russian Champion Peter Svidler is also on 50%.

Carlsen,M (2872) - Grischuk,A (2764) [C65]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d3 Bc5 5.c3 0–0 6.0–0 d6 7.h3 a6 8.Bxc6 bxc6 9.Re1 Re8 10.Nbd2 d5?! 11.exd5 Qxd5 (active play but a bad pawn formation)12.Nb3 Bf8 13.c4 Qd6 14.Be3 Nd7 15.d4 e4 16.Nfd2 a5 17.a4 f5 18.c5 Qg6 19.Nc4 Nf6 20.Bf4 Nd5 21.Qd2 Be6 22.Nbxa5 Reb8? (better was 22.. Nxf4) 23.Ne5 Qf6 24.Bh2 Rxa5 25.Qxa5 Rxb2 26.Rab1 Ra2 27.Qa6 e3 28.fxe3 Qg5 29.Re2! Nxe3 30.Nf3 Qg6 31.Rxa2 Bxa2 32.Rb2 Bc4 33.Qa5 Bd5 34.Qe1 f4 35.Bxf4 Nc2 36.Qf2 Bxf3 37.Rxc2 1–0

Scores after 7 rounds ( 8 players, 14 rounds, prize fund $ 645,000) :- M.Carlsen (NOR 2872, World no 1 ) and L.Aronian (ARM 2809,World no 3) 5 ; V.Kramnik (RUS 2810, World no 2) and P.Svidler (RUS 2747) 3.5 ; A.Grischuk (RUS 2764) and T.Radjabov (AZE 2793) 3 ; V.Ivanchuk (UKR 2757) and B.Gelfand (ISR 2740) 2.5.

Kevin Bonham
26-03-2013, 11:49 PM
I've been too busy trying to get my computer problems sorted out after the accident a few weeks ago to pay close attention to the recent rounds.

Anyway, Carlsen had a very tough job surviving this against Kramnik but pulled off an important draw.

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.25"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Kramnik,V"]
[Black "Carlsen,M"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2810"]
[BlackElo "2872"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "E06"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Ne5 Nc6 8.
Bxc6 bxc6 9. Nxc6 Qe8 10. Nxe7+ Qxe7 11. Qc2 e5 12. Rd1 Rb8 13. Nc3 h6 14.
dxe5 Qxe5 15. Bf4 Qe7 16. Rd4 Be6 17. Rad1 Rb6 18. Qd2 Kh7 19. f3 Rfb8 20.
Qe3 Rxb2 21. Rxc4 R2b7 22. Ra4 Re8 23. Rxa7 Rxa7 24. Qxa7 Qb4 25. Be5 Nd5
26. Nxd5 Bxd5 27. Qxc7 Qc4 28. a3 f6 29. Qxc4 Bxc4 30. Bc3 Rxe2 31. Rd4 Bb5
32. Bb4 Re3 33. Kf2 Re2+ 34. Kg1 Re3 35. f4 Re2 36. Rd6 Rc2 37. g4 Bc6 38.
Bd2 Bf3 39. h3 Ra2 40. Bb4 Rg2+ 41. Kf1 Rh2 1/2-1/2

...while Aronian tried to beat Gelfand with black and failed.

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.25"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Gelfand,B"]
[Black "Aronian,L"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2740"]
[BlackElo "2809"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D37"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Be2 c6 8.
O-O Nh5 9. Be5 f6 10. Bg3 f5 11. Be5 Nhf6 12. h3 Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Nd7 14. f4
Nxe5 15. fxe5 Bg5 16. Qd2 Bd7 17. Rac1 Rc8 18. a3 Kh8 19. b4 Be8 20. Bd3
Rc7 21. Ne2 Bh5 22. Nf4 Bxf4 23. exf4 Rd7 24. Qe3 dxc4 25. Bxc4 Rxd4 26.
Bxe6 Bf7 27. Bxf5 Bc4 28. e6 Qd6 29. Rfe1 Re8 30. e7 Bf7 31. Rc5 g6 32. Bg4
h5 33. f5 Kg7 34. fxg6 Bxg6 35. Bxh5 Rd3 36. Qe5+ Qxe5 37. Rcxe5 Bxh5 38.
Rxh5 Rxa3 39. Rf5 Rd3 40. Re4 Rd7 41. Rg4+ Kh6 42. Rf6+ Kh7 43. Rf7+ Kh6
44. Rgg7 Rd1+ 45. Kh2 Rf1 46. Rh7+ Kg6 47. Rhg7+ Kh6 48. Rh7+ Kg6 49. Rfg7+
Kf6 50. h4 Ke6 51. Rg4 Kf5 52. Kg3 Re1 53. Rf4+ Ke6 54. h5 Rxe7 55. Rxe7+
Kxe7 56. Kh4 b6 57. h6 Rh1+ 58. Kg5 Ke6 59. Kg6 Ke5 60. Rf5+ 1-0

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.25"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Svidler,P"]
[Black "Grischuk,A"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2747"]
[BlackElo "2764"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "E81"]

A very wild game to no avail!

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 c5 7. Nge2 Nc6 8.
d5 Ne5 9. Ng3 h5 10. Be2 h4 11. Nf1 e6 12. f4 Nxc4 13. Bxc4 b5 14. Bxb5
exd5 15. e5 dxe5 16. fxe5 Bg4 17. exf6 Bxd1 18. fxg7 Kxg7 19. Bxc5 h3 20.
Rxd1 hxg2 21. Rg1 gxf1=Q+ 22. Kxf1 Qh4 23. Rg2 Rfd8 24. Rd4 Qh5 25. Rf4 d4
26. Bxd4+ Rxd4 27. Rxd4 Rb8 28. a4 a6 29. Bxa6 Qf3+ 30. Rf2 Qh1+ 31. Ke2
Rxb2+ 32. Rd2 Qc1 33. Kd3 Rb6 34. Bc4 Rd6+ 35. Bd5 Rd7 36. Rf4 f5 37. Rd4
Kh6 38. h4 Rc7 39. Bc4 Qf1+ 40. Re2 f4 41. Kc2 f3 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.25"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Ivanchuk,V"]
[Black "Radjabov,T"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2757"]
[BlackElo "2793"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D37"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 Ne4 7. Bxe7 Qxe7
8. cxd5 Nxc3 9. bxc3 exd5 10. Qb3 c6 11. e3 O-O 12. Be2 Nd7 13. O-O Nf6 14.
Rfc1 Bg4 15. c4 dxc4 16. Qxc4 Rfe8 17. h3 Be6 18. Qc5 Qc7 19. Rc2 Bd5 20.
Rac1 Qd8 21. Qa3 Ne4 22. Ne5 Nd6 23. Bf3 Bxf3 24. Nxf3 Qd7 25. Qb4 Rad8 26.
a4 Qe6 27. Ne5 f6 28. Nd3 Qf7 29. Qa5 a6 30. Nc5 Rc8 31. Qb4 Rcd8 32. Qb6
Rc8 33. Rb1 Re7 34. Nd3 Rce8 35. Qb3 Qxb3 36. Rxb3 Kf7 37. g4 g5 38. Nc5
Rc8 39. Kg2 Rcc7 40. Nd3 Kg6 41. Nc5 h5 42. Rb1 Ne4 43. Nxe4 Rxe4 44. Kf3
Ree7 45. e4 Rcd7 46. Ke3 Rd5 47. f3 Rd6 48. Rb6 Red7 49. Rd2 hxg4 50. hxg4
Kf7 51. a5 Ke7 52. Rb1 Kf7 53. Rh1 Kg7 54. Rh5 Rd8 55. Rd1 R8d7 56. e5 Rd5
57. Rdh1 Kf7 58. Rh7+ Ke6 59. Rxd7 Kxd7 60. Rh7+ Ke6 61. Rh6 c5 62. Rxf6+
Ke7 63. Rb6 Rxd4 64. Rxb7+ Ke6 65. Rg7 Ra4 66. Rxg5 Rxa5 67. f4 Ra3+ 68.
Kd2 Ra2+ 69. Kc3 Rf2 70. Rg6+ Kd5 71. Rd6+ Ke4 72. Rf6 a5 73. e6 Kd5 74. f5
Re2 75. Rf8 Kd6 76. f6 1-0

Standings after nine rounds:

6 Carlsen
5.5 Aronian
5 Kramnik
4.5 Gelfand, Grischuk
4 Svidler
3.5 Ivanchuk
3 Radjabov

This positional crush of Svidler by Kramnik in round 8 is well worth a look:

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.24"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Kramnik,V"]
[Black "Svidler,P"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2810"]
[BlackElo "2747"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D85"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5
8. Be3 Qa5 9. Qd2 Nc6 10. Rc1 cxd4 11. cxd4 Qxd2+ 12. Kxd2 O-O 13. d5 Rd8
14. Kc2 Ne5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. Bc4 Bd7 17. f4 Bd6 18. Kb3 f6 19. a4 Rdc8 20.
h4 Rab8 21. Bb5 Bxb5 22. axb5 a6 23. b6 Kf7 24. h5 Rxc1 25. hxg6+ Kxg6 26.
Bxc1 Rg8 27. g4 h6 28. Rh5 Kf7 29. e5 Bc5 30. e6+ Kf8 31. Rh4 Kg7 32. f5
Rd8 33. Bxh6+ Kg8 34. Kc4 Bxb6 35. g5 Bf2 36. Rg4 Kh7 37. gxf6 exf6 38. e7
Rc8+ 39. Kb3 Bc5 40. Rc4 1-0

Adamski
26-03-2013, 11:54 PM
That was a sad round for Lev. Magnus should win now.

Qbert
27-03-2013, 10:25 AM
Hats off to Radjabov for turning up to every press conference and trying to giving a meaningful account of his play - despite some really upsetting results. :clap: :clap:

Though perhaps because the main sponsor is The State Oil Company of the Azerbaijan Republic (SOCAR), he feels more pressure to put on a professional demeanour than most...

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 03:04 AM
Grischuk not only got himself too short of time but then ridiculously blundered into a lost pawn ending against Kramnik.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 03:41 AM
Chucky's time handling was even worse, which ruined a fascinating game:

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 Ng4 4. Nf3 Nc6
5. Bf4 Bb4+ 6. Nc3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 Qe7 8. Qd5 f6 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. Qd3 d6 11. g3 O-O 12. Bg2 Bg4 13. O-O Rae8 14. Rae1 Kh8 15. Nd4 Ne5 16. Bxe5 dxe5 17. Nf5 Bxf5 18. Qxf5 Nd7 19. Qe4 c6 20. Rd1 Nb6 21. Rd3 Qc5 22. Qh4 g6 23. Be4 Kg7 24. Kg2 Qxc4 25. Rfd1 Qxa2 26. g4 Rf4 27. Bf5 Nd5
28. Rh3 Rh8 29. e3 gxf5 30. exf4 Nxf4+ 1-0

Do these guys need increments every move to save them from their own woeful time management?

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 04:14 AM
Tiebreak regs should it come to that:

3. 7 Tie-breaks
If the top two or more players score the same points, the tie will be decided by the following criteria, in order of priority:

a) The results of the games between the players involved in the tie.

If they are still tied:
b) The total number of wins in the tournament of every player involved in the tie.

If they are still tied:
c) Sonneborn - Berger System.

3.7.1.a
If there is no clear winner with the above 3 criteria, there will be a special competition between the players who still remain
tied after using the 3rd criteria (Sonneborn - Berger): after a new drawing of colors, each tied player will play two (2) tie-break games
with the other tied opponent(s). The games shall be played using the electronic clock starting with 25 minutes for each player with an
increment of 10 seconds after each move.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 04:31 AM
If Carlsen beats Gelfand, which seems extremely likely:

7 Carlsen
6.5 Aronian
6 Kramnik
4.5 Gelfand, Grischuk, Svidler
3.5 Ivanchuk, Radjabov

Adamski
28-03-2013, 06:05 AM
At least Chucky is not last on his own. A pretty bunched up field. .

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 01:47 PM
Carlsen did defeat Gelfand. I think Gelfand actually put up a good fight in this game but he just wasn't quite good enough!

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. O-O Nge7 5. Re1 a6 6. Bf1 d5 7. exd5 Nxd5
8. d4 Nf6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. Nxd4 Bd7 11. c4 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Bc6 13. Nc3 Be7 14.
a3 a5 15. Qd3 O-O 16. Rad1 Qc7 17. Be5 Qb6 18. Qg3 Rfd8 19. Rxd8+ Qxd8 20.
Rd1 Qb6 21. Bd4 Qb3 22. Rd3 Qc2 23. b4 axb4 24. axb4 Nh5 25. Qe5 Bf6 26.
Qxh5 Bxd4 27. Rxd4 Qxc3 28. Qa5 Rf8 29. Qb6 e5 30. Rd1 g6 31. b5 Be4 32.
Qf6 h5 33. h4 Bf5 34. Rd5 Qc1 35. Qxe5 Be6 36. Rd4 Ra8 37. Qe2 Kh7 38. Rd1
Qc3 39. Qe4 Ra1 40. Rxa1 Qxa1 41. c5 Qc3 42. Qxb7 Qe1 43. b6 Bc4 44. Qf3
Qxf1+ 45. Kh2 Qb1 46. b7 Qb5 47. c6 Bd5 48. Qg3 1-0

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2013, 01:44 AM
Grischuk - Carlsen
Svidler - Aronian
Kramnik - Radjabov
Ivanchuk - Gelfand was messy but drawn by repetition quickly.

Will probably be a few out of mathematical contention soon if they are not already.

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2013, 03:47 AM
Grischuk - Carlsen was drawn.

Kramnik - Radjabov. Black gets short of time and walks into a tactical sequence.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 c5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bg2 cxd4 6. Nxd4 O-O 7. Nc3 Qc7 8. b3 d5 9. Ndb5 Qa5 10. Bd2 dxc4 11. bxc4 Qd8 12. O-O a6 13. Na3 Bf5 14. Nc2 Nc6 15. Ne3 Qd7 16. Nxf5 Qxf5 17. Rb1 Rad8 18. Qc1 Qe6 19. Re1 Qxc4 20. Rxb7 Ne5 21. Bf4 Qe6 22. h3 Nc4 23. e4 Ne5 24. Bxe5 Qxe5 25. Nd5 Rfe8 26. Nb4 Rd7 27. Nc6 Qe6 28. Rb6 Qxa2 29. e5 Nd5 30. Rb2 Qa4 31. Bxd5 Rxd5 32. Rb4 Qa2 33. Nxe7+ Kh8 34. Nxd5 Qxd5 35. Qc4 Qxc4 36. Rxc4 Bxe5 37. Kf1 1-0

Ivanchuk and Radjabov are both out of mathematical contention now [edit: Jeff Sonas says they were already out).

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2013, 03:53 AM
Remaining pairings:

Rd 12

Carlsen - Ivanchuk
Gelfand - Svidler
Aronian - Kramnik
Radjabov - Grischuk

Rd 13

Radjabov - Carlsen
Grischuk - Aronian
Kramnik - Gelfand
Svidler - Ivanchuk

Rd 14

Carlsen - Svidler
Ivanchuk - Kramnik
Gelfand - Grischuk
Aronian - Radjabov

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
29-03-2013, 03:55 AM
when asked how he was able to triumph over radjabov in this latest round kramnik replied " i keep my energy levels very high. today i had a very big sandwich. it was this big." :D

http://www.ajedrez32.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/Vladimir-Kramnik.jpg

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2013, 04:02 AM
Svidler - Aronian. ...g5 was pretty incredible but ...b5 as well was just wrong.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. a3 Bxc3+ 5. bxc3 c5 6. e3 Qa5 7. Bd2 Ne4 8. Bd3 Nxd2 9. Qxd2 d6 10. f4 Nd7 11. Nf3 f5 12. e4 fxe4 13. Bxe4 Nf6 14. Bc2 Bd7 15. O-O cxd4 16. Qxd4 O-O 17. Qxd6 Qxc3 18. Bd3 Rad8 19. Rac1 Qa5 20. Ne5 Bc8 21. Qb4 Qc7
22. c5 g5 23. c6 b5 24. Qe1 Rd5 25. Qg3 h6 26. fxg5 Qxe5 27. Qxe5 Rxe5 28. gxf6 Kf7 29. Rf4 Rd8 30. Be4 Rd2 31. h4 a5 32. Rc3 Re2 33. Bg6+ Kf8 34. Rd4 Rd5 35. Rxd5 exd5 36. Rc5 Re1+ 37. Kh2 Rf1 38. f7 b4 39. axb4 axb4 40. Rxd5 Kg7 41. Rd8 1-0

7.5 Carlsen
7 Kramnik
6.5 Aronian
5.5 Svidler
5 Gelfand, Grischuk
4 Ivanchuk
3.5 Radjabov

Desmond
29-03-2013, 07:24 AM
when asked how he was able to triumph over radjabov in this latest round kramnik replied " i keep my energy levels very high. today i had a very big sandwich. it was this big." :D

http://www.ajedrez32.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/Vladimir-Kramnik.jpgEither that or he is about to fireball his opponent to death.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
29-03-2013, 07:50 AM
is vladi kramnik really Ryu from streetfighter ???? :D


http://www.sirlin.net/storage/street_fighter/ryu_hadoken_pose.png?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=12 26531909576

Bollard
29-03-2013, 09:24 AM
Last nights results make tonight's Aronian - Kramnik game really critical. You'd have to think that only Vlad has a realistic chance to catch Magnus now.

Carl Gorka
29-03-2013, 03:47 PM
Excellent, Grischuk uses the Zaitsev hack attack (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/its-good-friday-for-chess.html) against the Grunfeld :D

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
30-03-2013, 05:56 AM
Ryu wins again !!!!!! :owned:

Adamski
30-03-2013, 09:16 AM
Kramnik wins v Lev! 4 in a row I think for Vassily! And Chucky beat Carlsen!

MichaelBaron
30-03-2013, 09:17 AM
Kramnik is ridiculously lucky! I guess the ''stars'' want him to win :(

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
30-03-2013, 12:30 PM
Kramnik wins v Lev! 4 in a row I think for Vassily! And Chucky beat Carlsen!

vassily kramnik is certainly unstoppable at the moment. ;)

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
30-03-2013, 12:40 PM
Kramnik is ridiculously lucky! I guess the ''stars'' want him to win :(

come on michael, vladi k seems like a nice enough chap. why dont you jump on board the victory train and take a triumphant sojourn with the champ ?

theres is always room for more passengers if you choose to reconsider. :D

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2013, 01:02 PM
Kramnik had some bad "luck" earlier in the tournament.

Incredible. I went to bed just after the first time control and I thought Kramnik had blown it for good and it was going to be a draw, and also that Carlsen was in only mild trouble against Ivanchuk. The pressure produced all kinds of strange things this round!

8 Kramnik
7.5 Carlsen
6.5 Aronian
6 Svidler
5.5 Grischuk, Gelfand
5 Ivanchuk
4 Radjabov

Only the top three can still mathematically make it. An advantage for Carlsen is that if he gets a win and a draw and Kramnik gets two draws, he will qualify by most wins.

Rest day tonight.

[FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.29"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Gelfand,B"]
[Black "Svidler,P"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2740"]
[BlackElo "2747"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "A15"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Be6 7. Qc2 Bg4
8. Qe4 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 c6 10. e3 Bg7 11. Be2 e5 12. dxe5 Bxe5 13. Qe4 Qe7 14.
Bd2 N8d7 15. Qc2 O-O 16. O-O Rfe8 17. Rfd1 a5 18. Be1 a4 19. Rab1 Nc5 20.
Bf1 Red8 21. g3 Bg7 22. Rxd8+ Rxd8 23. b4 axb3 24. axb3 Ra8 25. b4 Ncd7 26.
Ne4 Ra1 27. Rxa1 Bxa1 28. Qa2 Be5 29. Bg2 Nf6 30. Nc5 Bd6 31. Nd3 Ne4 32.
Qa7 Nd5 33. Qd4 f5 34. Qc4 Qe6 35. f3 Ng5 36. Bd2 Nc7 37. Qxe6+ Ngxe6 38.
f4 Nd5 39. e4 fxe4 40. Bxe4 Nd4 41. Kf2 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.29"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Aronian,L"]
[Black "Kramnik,V"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2809"]
[BlackElo "2810"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "D42"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e3 Nc6 7. Bd3 Be7 8.
a3 O-O 9. Qc2 cxd4 10. exd4 f5 11. O-O Bf6 12. Nxd5 Qxd5 13. Be3 b5 14. Qe2
Bb7 15. Rac1 a6 16. Rfd1 f4 17. Rc5 Qd6 18. Qc2 fxe3 19. Bxh7+ Kh8 20. fxe3
Ne7 21. e4 Rac8 22. e5 Bxe5 23. Nxe5 Rxc5 24. Ng6+ Nxg6 25. dxc5 Be4 26.
Rxd6 Bxc2 27. Bxg6 Bxg6 28. Rxe6 Bd3 29. h4 a5 30. c6 Rf1+ 31. Kh2 Rc1 32.
Re3 Bb1 33. Rc3 Rxc3 34. bxc3 Kg8 35. c7 Bf5 36. Kg3 Kf7 37. Kf4 Bc8 38.
Kg5 Bd7 39. h5 Be6 40. g3 a4 41. g4 Kf8 42. Kf4 Ke7 43. g5 Kd7 44. Ke5 Bg8
45. c8=Q+ Kxc8 46. Kd6 Kd8 47. Kc6 Ke7 48. Kxb5 Ke6 49. Kxa4 Kf5 50. g6 Kg5
51. Kb5 Kxh5 52. a4 Kxg6 53. a5 Kf6 54. a6 Bd5 55. c4 Ba8 56. Kb6 Ke5 57.
Kc7 g5 58. Kb8 Be4 59. Kc7 g4 60. a7 g3 61. c5 Ba8 62. Kb8 Bc6 0-1

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.29"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Radjabov,T"]
[Black "Grischuk,A"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2793"]
[BlackElo "2764"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "E35"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 d5 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bxf6 Qxf6
8. a3 Bxc3+ 9. Qxc3 O-O 10. e3 Bf5 11. Nf3 Nd7 12. Be2 Rfc8 13. O-O c5 14.
b3 Qb6 15. dxc5 Nxc5 16. b4 Na4 17. Qe5 Nc3 18. Rfe1 Bg4 19. Bd3 Bxf3 20.
gxf3 Qe6 21. Qd4 Rc6 22. b5 Rc7 23. Kh1 Re8 24. Rg1 Qe5 25. Qxe5 Rxe5 26.
Rg4 Kf8 27. a4 Rc5 28. Rd4 g6 29. h3 Re6 30. Kg2 Kg7 31. Rb4 b6 32. Rd4 f5
33. Kf1 Kf6 34. Ke1 Re7 35. Kd2 Rc8 36. Ra3 Rec7 37. Ra1 g5 38. Rb4 Rd8 39.
Rd4 Rdc8 40. Ra3 h5 41. h4 g4 42. Rf4 gxf3 43. Bxf5 Ke5 44. Rxc3 Rxc3 45.
Bxc8 Rxc8 46. Kd3 Rc1 47. Rxf3 Rc4 48. Rf7 Rxa4 49. f4+ Ke6 50. Rh7 Ra3+
51. Kd4 Ra4+ 52. Kd3 Ra3+ 53. Ke2 Ra2+ 54. Kf3 Ra3 55. Rh6+ Ke7 56. Rxh5 d4
57. Re5+ Kf6 58. Re4 dxe3 59. Rxe3 Ra5 60. Re5 a6 61. bxa6 Rxa6 62. Rb5 Ra1
63. Rxb6+ Kf5 64. Rb5+ Kf6 65. Kg4 Rg1+ 66. Kh5 Rh1 67. Ra5 Rh2 68. Ra8 Rh1
69. Rg8 Kf7 70. Rg4 Kf6 71. Rg8 Kf7 72. Rc8 Kf6 73. Rc5 Rh2 74. Rg5 Rh1 75.
Kg4 Rg1+ 76. Kf3 Rf1+ 77. Kg3 Rg1+ 78. Kf2 Rh1 79. h5 Rh4 80. Kg3 Rh1 81.
Ra5 Rg1+ 82. Kf2 Rh1 83. Kg2 Rh4 84. Kf3 Rh1 85. h6 Rxh6 86. Ra6+ Kf5 87.
Rxh6 1/2-1/2

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.29"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Carlsen,M"]
[Black "Ivanchuk,V"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2872"]
[BlackElo "2757"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "B48"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 e6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Qd2 Nf6
8. O-O-O Bb4 9. f3 Ne7 10. Nb3 d5 11. e5 Nd7 12. f4 b6 13. Bd4 Nc5 14. a3
Ne4 15. Qe1 Nxc3 16. Bxc3 Bxc3 17. Qxc3 Qxc3 18. bxc3 a5 19. Nd4 Ba6 20.
Bd3 Kd7 21. Kd2 Nc6 22. Rb1 Bxd3 23. Kxd3 Rab8 24. Nb5 g5 25. g3 Rhg8 26.
c4 gxf4 27. gxf4 Ne7 28. Rhg1 dxc4+ 29. Kxc4 Nd5 30. Nd6 Kc6 31. Nxf7 Nxf4
32. Kb3 Kc5 33. Ng5 h6 34. Ne4+ Kd4 35. Nf6 Rxg1 36. Rxg1 Rc8 37. Re1 Rc3+
38. Kb2 Rf3 39. Re4+ Kc5 40. Nd7+ Kd5 41. Nf6+ Kc5 42. Nd7+ Kc6 43. Nf6 Ng6
44. Rc4+ Kb5 45. Re4 Rf5 46. Ne8 Kc5 47. Nc7 Nxe5 48. Rh4 Kd6 49. Nb5+ Kd7
50. a4 h5 51. Nd4 Rg5 52. Re4 Nc4+ 53. Kc3 Re5 54. Rh4 Nd6 55. Kd3 Rd5 56.
c4 Rg5 57. Nf3 Rc5 58. Nd2 Rf5 59. Nb3 Nb7 60. Rh3 Kd6 61. Kc3 Nc5 62. Nxc5
Kxc5 63. Re3 e5 64. h4 Kd6 65. Rd3+ Ke6 66. Rg3 Kf6 67. Rd3 Rf4 68. Rd6+
Kf5 69. Rxb6 Rxh4 70. c5 Rxa4 71. Rh6 Ke4 72. Rd6 Rd4 73. Ra6 Kd5 74. Rxa5
Rc4+ 75. Kd3 Rxc5 76. Ra4 Rc7 77. Rh4 Rh7 78. Ke3 Ke6 79. Ke4 Rh8 80. Ke3
Kf5 81. Ke2 Kg5 82. Re4 Re8 83. Ke3 h4 84. Ke2 h3 85. Kf2 h2 86. Kg2 h1=Q+
87. Kxh1 Kf5 88. Re1 Rg8 89. Kh2 Kf4 90. Rf1+ Ke3 0-1

Bollard
31-03-2013, 07:08 PM
Last nights results make tonight's Aronian - Kramnik game really critical. You'd have to think that only Vlad has a realistic chance to catch Magnus now.

And this is probably the first time I haven't tipped Vlad in a poll.

Kevin Bonham
31-03-2013, 08:24 PM
And this is probably the first time I haven't tipped Vlad in a poll.

My tipping record in these polls is so awful that even someone as heavily favoured as Carlsen can fail if he has me on his side.

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2013, 02:51 AM
Svidler - Ivanchuk

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. Be2 Nge7 7. O-O Ng6 8. g3 cxd4 9. cxd4 f6 10. exf6 Qxf6 11. Bg5 Qf7 12. Be3 h6 13. Nc3 Bd6 14. Nb5 Bb8 15. Ne5 Ngxe5 16. dxe5 Nxe5 17. Bc5 Nc4 18. b3 b6 19. Bb4 a5 20. Bc3 Bxb5 21. Bh5 g6 22. Bxh8 gxh5 23. Re1 Qf5 24. bxc4 Bxc4 25. Qd4 Bc7 26. Be5 O-O-O 27. Rac1 Rd7 28. a4 Qg4 29. Qe3 h4 30. Qxh6 hxg3 31. hxg3 Bd8 32. Bf4 Re7 33. Bg5 Kd7 34. Bxe7 Bxe7 35. Kg2 Bc5 36. f3 Qf5 37. Qg7+ Flag 1-0

Tony Dowden
01-04-2013, 08:55 AM
This time I went to bed thinking Kramnik was going to break through Gelfand's defences and Rajabov would hold Carlsen for 200 moves :lol:

The last round will be incredible!

Tony Dowden
01-04-2013, 09:02 AM
Kramnik is ridiculously lucky! I guess the ''stars'' want him to win :(

I disagree. He's been playing logical and strong chess for the whole event. Although I'd prefer an Anand-Carlsen match, Kramnik has put himself in a position to win and deserves huge credit for his fantastic +4 (so far) second half.

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2013, 12:58 PM
It's what he does: Carlsen kept pushing and pushing and finally Radjabov blundered on move 80.

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.31"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Radjabov,T"]
[Black "Carlsen,M"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2793"]
[BlackElo "2872"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "E32"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 d6 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. g3 O-O 7. Bg2 e5 8.
O-O c6 9. Rd1 Re8 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. a3 Bxc3 12. Qxc3 Qe7 13. b4 Nb6 14. Be3
Ng4 15. Nd2 f5 16. h3 Nxe3 17. Qxe3 e4 18. Rac1 Be6 19. Qc3 Rad8 20. Bf1 c5
21. bxc5 Na4 22. Qb4 Nxc5 23. Nb3 Rxd1 24. Rxd1 Na6 25. Qxe7 Rxe7 26. e3
Kf7 27. Be2 b6 28. Rd8 Nc5 29. Nd4 Kf6 30. Kf1 Rd7 31. Rf8+ Bf7 32. Ke1 g6
33. h4 h6 34. Rc8 Be6 35. Rf8+ Rf7 36. Rh8 Rc7 37. Nb5 Rd7 38. Nd4 h5 39.
Rf8+ Bf7 40. Rc8 Ke5 41. Ra8 a6 42. Rc8 Rd6 43. Nc6+ Kf6 44. Nd4 Be6 45.
Rf8+ Ke7 46. Ra8 Rd7 47. Rb8 Rb7 48. Rxb7+ Nxb7 49. Kd2 Kd6 50. Kc3 Bf7 51.
Nb3 Ke5 52. Bf1 a5 53. Be2 Be6 54. Bf1 Bd7 55. Be2 Ba4 56. Nd4 Nc5 57. Kb2
Be8 58. Kc3 Bf7 59. Nc6+ Kd6 60. Nd4 Nd7 61. Nb5+ Kc5 62. Nd4 Ne5 63. Nb3+
Kc6 64. a4 Kd7 65. Nd4 Kd6 66. Nb5+ Kc5 67. Nd4 Be8 68. Nb3+ Kd6 69. c5+
Kc7 70. Kd4 Nc6+ 71. Kc3 Ne7 72. cxb6+ Kxb6 73. Nd2 Bxa4 74. Nc4+ Ka6 75.
Na3+ Kb7 76. Nc4 Ka6 77. Na3+ Ka7 78. Kd4 Nc6+ 79. Kc5 Ne5 80. Nc4 Nd3+ 81.
Kd4 Nc1 82. Bf1 Bb5 83. Nxa5 Bxf1 84. Nc6+ Kb6 85. Ne7 Nd3 86. Nxg6 Kc7 87.
Ne7 Bh3 88. Nd5+ Kd6 89. Nf6 Bg4 0-1

Kramnik had excellent winning chances but the position was very complicated and Gelfand defended very well.

[Event "FIDE Candidates"]
[Site "London ENG"]
[Date "2013.03.31"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Kramnik,V"]
[Black "Gelfand,B"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2810"]
[BlackElo "2740"]
[EventDate "2013.03.15"]
[ECO "E60"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 c6 4. Bg2 d5 5. e3 dxc4 6. Ne2 Bg7 7. O-O O-O 8.
Na3 Nbd7 9. Nxc4 Nb6 10. Na5 Qc7 11. b4 e5 12. dxe5 Qxe5 13. Nd4 Ne4 14.
Qc2 Re8 15. Ba3 Qe7 16. Rad1 h5 17. Rd3 Nd5 18. Rfd1 Bg4 19. Rc1 Bxd4 20.
Rxd4 Ng5 21. Qd3 Nf3+ 22. Bxf3 Bxf3 23. b5 Qe6 24. Nxb7 cxb5 25. Nd6 Qh3
26. Qf1 Qxf1+ 27. Kxf1 Re6 28. Nxb5 Rb8 29. Nd6 Nf6 30. Rf4 Bd5 31. Rc2 Ne4
32. Nxf7 Ra6 33. Bc1 Re8 34. Rc7 Rxa2 35. Nh6+ Kh8 36. Nf7+ Kg8 37. f3 Bxf7
38. Rfxf7 Rd8 39. Rg7+ Kf8 40. Rgf7+ Kg8 41. Ke1 Nc5 42. Rg7+ Kf8 43. Rgf7+
Kg8 44. Rg7+ Kf8 45. Rh7 Nd3+ 46. Kf1 Kg8 47. Rcg7+ Kf8 48. Rf7+ Kg8 49.
Rfg7+ Kf8 50. Rb7 Kg8 51. Rhg7+ Kf8 52. Rgc7 Nxc1 53. Rxc1 Rxh2 54. Kg1 Re2
55. e4 a5 56. Ra7 a4 57. Rb1 a3 58. Rxa3 Rdd2 59. Ra7 Rg2+ 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2013, 02:00 PM
Tonight's equation is simple: Carlsen with white against Svidler must at least match whatever result Kramnik gets with black against Ivanchuk. If he matches, he is through on most wins tiebreak.

Saragossa
01-04-2013, 04:26 PM
I hope Carlsen wins. It would be so exciting to see him in match play, especially if he can reunite with Kasparov.

pax
01-04-2013, 07:29 PM
I hope Carlsen wins. It would be so exciting to see him in match play, especially if he can reunite with Kasparov.

I agree. I'm actually really pleased to see Kramnik doing well, but I think it's really important to see Carlsen playing in a Classical match for the World Championship.

James Watson
01-04-2013, 07:38 PM
I agree. I'm actually really pleased to see Kramnik doing well, but I think it's really important to see Carlsen playing in a Classical match for the World Championship.
This is exactly how I feel

Agent Smith
01-04-2013, 08:18 PM
Yes, Vlad has been playing well, but i'm worried that if he wins, Anand will have the psychological edge over him.

Against Aronian or Carlsen , Vishi doesnt have much of a chance imho.

Anyway - come on Magnus :clap:

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 01:11 AM
I'm watching but am not using the shoutbox for comments at the moment to keep it clear because of the terrible post-Doeberl car crash news.

At the moment it's move 20 in Carlsen-Svidler and white has nothing, it's move 19 in Ivanchuk-Kramnik and White is clearly better but has 39 mins for 21 moves.

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 02:17 AM
Carlsen might have something against Svidler here after 25.exd5 Bxd5 - and now he has played 26.Ng4. (Bxd5 then Ng4 was also an option)

Ivanchuk has just sacced a pawn for some play down the h-file.

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 02:35 AM
Carlsen and Ivanchuk both in time trouble in unclear positions.

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 03:02 AM
Carlsen had 10 seconds for six moves and made time control in a lost position. Kramnik is also losing! If Kramnik loses the result of Carlsen's game is irrelevant.

James Watson
02-04-2013, 03:07 AM
Really down to the wire here, it would be amazing if they both lost giving Carlson 1st

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 03:18 AM
Looks like the way it is going!

Gelfand - Grischuk
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bd2 Bg7 6. e4 Nxc3 7. Bxc3 c5 8. d5 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 O-O 10. Qd2 e6 11. Bc4 exd5 12. Bxd5 Nc6 13. Nf3 Qf6 14. O-O Bg4 15. Qe3 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Rae8 17. Kh1 b5 18. Rad1 b4 19. f4 Ne7 20. c4 Qa6 21. Qxc5 Nxd5 22. exd5 Qa3 23. d6 Qf3+ 24. Kg1 Qg4+ 25. Kh1 Qf3+ 26. Kg1 Qg4+ 27. Kh1 Qf3+ ½-½

Aronian - Radjabov

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. h3 O-O 6. Bg5 a6 7. Nf3 c5 8. dxc5 Qa5 9. Bd3 dxc5 10. O-O Nc6 11. Nd5 Be6 12. Qb3 b5 13. Rac1 bxc4 14. Bxc4 Nxe4 15. Qb7 Rac8 16. Bxe7 Bxd5 17. Bxf8 Rb8 18. Qxb8 Nxb8 19. Bxd5 Kxf8 20. Bxe4 Nd7 21. b3 Qxa2 22. Rcd1 Ne5 23. Rd8+ Ke7 24. Rb8 Nxf3+ 25. Bxf3 Bd4 26. g3 a5 27. Re1+ Kf6 28. Re2 Qb1+ 29. Kg2 a4 30. Rb7 a3 31. Bd5 a2 32. Rxf7+ Kg5 33. h4+ Kh6 34. Ree7 g5 35. Be4 1-0

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 03:50 AM
Svidler has beaten Carlsen so Carlsen needs Ivanchuk to convert. Haven't got a clean copy of the PGN of Svidler-Carlsen yet (quite a few sites have been melting down!)

Svidler has had a good tournament.

Poor Carlsen has to sit in the press conference waiting for Kramnik to lose!

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2013, 04:11 AM
Ivanchuk has beaten Kramnik. Carlsen is through. What an amazing tournament!

1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O a6 7. h3 Nc6 8. Bg5 b5 9. a3 h6 10. Be3 e5 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Qc1 Kh7 13. Bc5 Re8 14. Rd1 Bd7 15. b4 Qc8 16. Qe3 Nd8 17. a4 bxa4 18. Nxa4 Ne6 19. Bc4 Nh5 20. Nc3 Nhf4 21. Nd5 Bb5 22. Bb3 Bc6 23. Ra5 Qb7 24. g3 Nxh3+ 25. Kg2 Nhg5 26. Rh1 Kg8 27. Nxg5 Nxg5 28. f3 Bxd5 29. Bxd5 c6 30. Bc4 Qc8 31. Qb3 h5 32. Be3 Ne6 33. Rha1 h4 34. gxh4 Qd8 35. Rxa6 Rc8 36. Rh1 Rc7 37. Bxe6 Rxe6 38. b5 Rb7 39. b6 c5 40. Rb1 Bf8 41. Qd5 Qb8 42. Rba1 Rd6 43. Ra8 Rxd5 44. Rxb8 Rxb8 45. exd5 Bd6 46. Ra6 Rb7 47. Kf1 1-0

8.5/14 (+3) Carlsen, Kramnik (Carlsen wins on tiebreak)
8 (+2) Svidler, Aronian
6.5 (-1) Grischuk, Gelfand
6 (-2) Ivanchuk
4 (-6) Radjabov

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
02-04-2013, 04:53 AM
hi kev,

i will now accept the title of chesschat jinx as you have successfully unshackled yourself from this tag.

yours sincerely,

g.u.b.

p.s. vladi kramnik is still the best streetfighter player.

Agent Smith
02-04-2013, 06:03 AM
In the words of Father Ted - Unbelieevable!

Adamski
02-04-2013, 06:09 AM
Once again it is congratulations to Magnus. Good finish by Chucky after a horror start.

peter_parr
02-04-2013, 11:27 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 1st April 2013.

Kramnik overtakes Carlsen
Peter Parr

Former World Champion Vladimir Kramnik has dramatically overtaken Magnus Carlsen in the twelfth round of the world championship candidates tournament in London. Kramnik appeared to be out of the running at the half-way stage with an unimpressive seven draws from seven games well behind his main rivals Carlsen and Levon Aronian who had each scored three wins and four draws.

Kramnik won in rd 8, Aronian lost to Gelfand in rd 9 and the three leaders all won in rd 10 leaving the scores – Carlsen 7, Aronian 6.5, Kramnik 6. Carlsen drew in rd 11, Aronian lost to six time Russian Champion Peter Svidler and Kramnik won again. Scores - Carlsen 7.5, Kramnik 7, Aronian 6.5.

The game in rd 12 between Aronian playing white against Kramnik was an epic complicated struggle with both players desperately needing to win to try and catch Carlsen. Aronian made a fatal mistake advancing the wrong pawn on move 50 in an equal position and lost. Meanwhile Carlsen playing white was under extra pressure as Kramnik had already won. Vassily Ivanchuk finally beat Carlsen in a 90 move marathon after Carlsen missed a draw on move 71. Kramnik has scored an amazing 4.5/5 (draw with Carlsen) in the second half with two rounds to play.

Grischuk,A (2764) - Kramnik,V (2810) [C67] rd 10
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0–0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Bd7 10.h3 h6 11.Rd1 Kc8 12.a4 a5 13.b3 b6 14.Bb2 Ne7 15.Rd2 c5 16.Ne2 Ng6 17.Rad1 Be6 18.c4 Be7 19.Nc3 Kb7 20.Nd5 Rad8 21.Nxe7 Rxd2 22.Nxd2 Nxe7 23.Nf1 Kc8 24.f3 g5 25.Ng3 Rd8 26.Rxd8+ Kxd8 27.Kf2 Bf5 28.Nxf5 Nxf5 29.g4 Nd4 30.Bxd4? (the losing move. 30 Ke3 is equal ) 30...cxd4 31.Ke2 Kd7 32.Kd3 c5 33.Ke4 Ke6 34.f4 gxf4 35.Kxf4 d3 36.Ke3 Kxe5 37.Kxd3 Kf4 38.Ke2 Kg3 39.Ke3 Kxh3 40.Kf4 Kh4 41.Kf5 Kg3 0–1

Scores after 12 rounds (8 players, 14 rounds):- V.Kramnik (RUS 2810 world no 2) 8 ; M.Carlsen (NOR 2872, World No.1) 7.5 ; L.Aronian (ARM 2809 World No.3) 6.5 ; P.Svidler (RUS 2747) 6 ; A.Grischuk (RUS 2764), B.Gelfand (ISR 2740) 5.5 ; V.Ivanchuk (UKR 2757) 5 ; T.Radjabov (AZE 2793 World no 4) 4 . If the final scores are tied on 9/14 with Kramnik drawing twice and Carlsen scoring 1.5/2 then Carlsen will be declared winner on countback (most wins). Kramnik has a 65% chance and Carlsen a 35% chance of becoming the Challenger against World Champion Vishy Anand (IND) later this year.

STOP PRESS: Carlsen wins on countback from Kramnik each 8½/14.

Davidflude
02-04-2013, 03:38 PM
report from the official web site

Magnus Carlsen won the FIDE Candidates' Tournament in London on Monday after a bizarre finish of what has become a historic event for chess. Both the Norwegian and the other leader, Vladimir Kramnik of Russia, unexpectedly lost their game in the final round, and so they remained tied for first place and Carlsen won on the second tie-break rule: higher number of wins. This means that in the next title match, World Champion Viswanathan Anand will face Carlsen. On the last day Levon Aronian of Armenia beat Teimour Radjabov of Azerbaijan while Boris Gelfand of Israel and Alexander Grischuk of Russia drew their game.

Agent Smith
02-04-2013, 05:28 PM
Once again it is congratulations to Magnus. Good finish by Chucky after a horror start.
Ivanchuk defeated both Kramnik and Carlsen :)

Bollard
02-04-2013, 08:41 PM
You'd have to think that this will go down as one of the more memorable Canditates Tournaments ever.

To have the two leading candidates both lose their last rounds games seems extraordinary.

Capablanca-Fan
03-04-2013, 12:24 AM
It's a travesty of chess that something as important as the challenger to the World Champion is selected on by a crass "tie-break" system instead of a playoff as with Bronstein v Boleslavsky in 1950. At least in 1983, the entry to the Candidates Final between Hübner and Smyslov was decided more honestly, with a roulette wheel. This at least makes no pretence that there is any merit behind the tie-break.

Rhubarb
03-04-2013, 03:52 AM
It's a travesty of chess that something as important as the challenger to the World Champion is selected on by a crass "tie-break" system instead of a playoff as with Bronstein v Boleslavsky in 1950. At least in 1983, the entry to the Candidates Final between Hübner and Smyslov was decided more honestly, with a roulette wheel. This at least makes no pretence that there is any merit behind the tie-break.
Have to agree with Jono although it's all a bit post-hoc now since everyone certainly knew the rules...

Tiebreak systems are fundamentally idiotic in round-robins.

How many times does this need to be said?

Qbert
03-04-2013, 06:34 AM
I would have preferred a playoff as well - but playing devil's advocate: Obviously the tie-break system was chosen to favour players who took risks to try to win games rather than play for only two results. Maybe that's why the players produced such fighting chess.... I was enthralled :) Best candidates ever! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Capablanca-Fan
03-04-2013, 06:45 AM
Obviously the tie-break system was chosen to favour players who took risks to try to win games rather than play for only two results.
Obviously the tie-break system is chosen by dilettantes who are not strong enough to appreciate the virtue of solidity and hard-fought draws. This helped Petrosian win the gruelling candidates in 1962 while his main rivals did a Carlsen/Kramnik and lost late games, and it helped Kramnik dethrone the great Kasparov who had swept all other match opponents before him. Whether a score is reached by 1s and 0s or by 1/2s, there is no good chess reason, as opposed to dilettantes getting their jollies only from wins no matter how bad, for a scoring system or tiebreak to prefer one style over another.

Rhubarb
03-04-2013, 06:49 AM
I would have preferred a playoff as well - but playing devil's advocate: Obviously the tie-break system was chosen to favour players who took risks to try to win games rather than play for only two results. Maybe that's why the players produced such fighting chess.... I was enthralled :) Best candidates ever! :clap: :clap: :clap:
You might be right - I'll have a think about it.

Qbert
03-04-2013, 10:14 AM
Obviously the tie-break system is chosen by dilettantes who are not strong enough to appreciate the virtue of solidity and hard-fought draws. This helped Petrosian win the gruelling candidates in 1962 while his main rivals did a Carlsen/Kramnik and lost late games, and it helped Kramnik dethrone the great Kasparov who had swept all other match opponents before him. Whether a score is reached by 1s and 0s or by 1/2s, there is no good chess reason, as opposed to dilettantes getting their jollies only from wins no matter how bad, for a scoring system or tiebreak to prefer one style over another.
Thanks Jono for your insinuation that I am not strong enough to appreciate a hard-fought draw. You're probably right. If I wanted to see the highest level of chess played, I would follow computer championship games. However, for me chess is a human sport, compltee with drama, pratfalls and all the human interest that entails. I'll keep my jollies and you can have your solidity :)

Capablanca-Fan
03-04-2013, 10:42 AM
Thanks Jono for your insinuation that I am not strong enough to appreciate a hard-fought draw.
Excuse me Q, that was not my insinuation at all. You prefaced your comment with saying that you were playing devil's advocate. Hence I was insulting those hypothetical people you were advocating for, not you. It was my mistake to cut out too much of what you said in my comment, for which I apologize.

Capablanca-Fan
03-04-2013, 10:45 AM
“Carlsen will be ridiculously difficult to play agains” (http://www.indianexpress.com/news/carlsen-will-be-ridiculously-difficult-to-play-against/1096789/0)
Interview with Anand in Indian Express


Kramnik losing out on the tie-break rule was quite tragic.

At the moment I feel unbelievably sympathetic towards Vlady. It was not like I was rooting for him as my opponent, but by round 13 I felt he was the one who deserved to win and his chess had impressed me the most. He had really changed his chess and style for the event. Magnus was doing what he always does and being very good at it. He is simply an unbelievable player. But Vlady was doing unbelievable stuff on the board, coming up every day with new ideas, playing brilliantly. He is in the 30s and he has been the most successful in fighting this...Younger players tend to have more energy...And I felt some sympathy, almost like a brother from my generation kind of a thing. The fact that with the tiebreak rules, he had to play outside of his comfort zone. He was so much in control in the first 13 games and in the 14th you can only understand the context, that he had to take unreasonable risks. The tragedy of the tournament is in some sense Kramnik, not that Magnus didn't deserve to win, but if Vlady had pulled it off, he would have proven something.


Would it have been better to decide the tournament with match play between the tied players, or maybe rapid games instead of a tie-break rule?

Both of them were very distracted yesterday (Monday), not just playing their own games but playing the other one too. It's not the ideal way to play chess. Even if Vlady was half a point behind, they still would have had to do that, look nervously at each other, but I do feel it's crazy that two people tied on the same score and it is decided by something which is essentially a lottery. Sometimes it happens. Before a tournament starts you don't split hairs on a minor detail while getting ready for it. You could see maybe why nobody paid attention to it, but it turned out to be crucial.. My point is not that it is unfair, it was perfectly fair once everyone knew it in advance. My point is that it is not ideal. That's the distinction I want to make. It felt a bit silly, in the end getting decided by the number of wins.

Qbert
03-04-2013, 11:36 AM
Apology accepted Jono - and sorry if I imputed too much to your choice of words.

By they way - in my view chess drama doesn't rule out drawn results - many of the draws between Karpov & Kasparov 1984 match weren't even serious attempts to win by either side, but still had drama in the context of a match with a (theoretically) unlimited number of games.

I have to agree with Anand's comments you posted. The final result seems unfair to Kramnik in retrospect.

The only benefit of the tie-break system was that virtually no two players could go into the final round with an equal chance of winning the tournament, so had to potentially play for a result right to the end, rather than steer the game to a draw and rest for the playoff.

Jesper Norgaard
03-04-2013, 04:57 PM
Apology accepted Jono - and sorry if I imputed too much to your choice of words.

By they way - in my view chess drama doesn't rule out drawn results - many of the draws between Karpov & Kasparov 1984 match weren't even serious attempts to win by either side, but still had drama in the context of a match with a (theoretically) unlimited number of games.

I have to agree with Anand's comments you posted. The final result seems unfair to Kramnik in retrospect.

The only benefit of the tie-break system was that virtually no two players could go into the final round with an equal chance of winning the tournament, so had to potentially play for a result right to the end, rather than steer the game to a draw and rest for the playoff.

It is funny that Ivanchuk won against both candidates still standing. Since they drew against each other, shouldn't Ivanchuk have been the challenger? :clap:

I have to agree with Anand, this seemed to be an unfair result to Kramnik. Mostly because as could be seen it was often a matter of luck when a good position actually became winning. For instance the Santa Claus gifts of Ivanchuk in 5 games where he would simply use up all his time independent if he had a good or bad position. Also Kramnik had 2-3 winning positions in the first half, which were drawn. Thus any argument that having Most Losses decide the tiebreak gives more combative chess, simply is a dubious statement. When Aronian lost the first game, but he still kept pace with Magnus, I thought it would be decisive so he would lose a tiebreak against Aronian. Then Magnus also lost, and Aronian began losing several, Kramnik suddenly receiving Santa Claus gifts, and the "Most Losses" turned into an advantage for Magnus. In retrospect, it looks like a lottery, which the statistics of 52.40% for "Most Wins" also shows that it is.

In the final position Kramnik had better Sonneborn-Berger. However, if they both would have won instead of losing, Carlsen would have had better SB tiebreak. If they had both drawn, they would have had SB depending on the other players' results. Given that the main result here is to get the right challenger, I think that going straight to playoff without applying any other tiebreak would have been most satisfying for everybody. Actually there was a day set off for playoffs anyhow, so why not use it? The closing ceremony was a fixed date, and the playoff would have been spectacular in itself.

Adamski
03-04-2013, 05:10 PM
I agree that the right challenger for Anand's worl dchampion title in Magnus emerged, even if I don't like the way that he was chosen as challenger.

peter_parr
08-04-2013, 01:00 PM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald Monday 8th April 2013.

Carlsen wins Candidates
Peter Parr

World No.1 Magnus Carlsen won the World championship candidates tournament in London on count back (most wins) from World No.2 Vladimir Kramnik. The Anand-Carlsen world title match will be held later this year. The final round was dramatic with both Carlsen and Kramnik losing. Carlsen scored 5 wins, 7 draws and 2 losses, Kramnik 4 wins, 9 draws and 1 loss.

Final scores (8 players, 14 rounds, prize fund $ 632,000):- M.Carlsen (NOR 2872) and V.Kramnik (RUS 2810) 8.5: P.Svidler (RUS 2747), L.Aronian (ARM 2809) 8: B.Gelfand (ISR 2740), A.Grischuk (RUS 2764) 6.5: V.Ivanchuk (UKR 2757) 6: T.Radjabov (AZE 2793) 4.