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peter_parr
29-10-2012, 10:26 AM
The following article was printed in the Sydney Morning Herald column on 29 October 2012.

The Chigorin Memorial started on Saturday evening with 350 players including 173 titled (63 grandmasters) from 31 Federations in St. Petersburg, Russia. The top seeds are A.Shirov (LAT 2718), A.Areshchenko (UKR 2710),Z.Almasi (HUN 2707),V.Akopian (ARM 2703). Over 50 Grandmasters in a field of 173 competed in the Chigorin rapid play won by GM Denis Khismatullin (RUS 2618) scoring 8/9.

Mikhail Chigorin (1850-1908) from St. Petersburg was the founder of the Soviet School of Chess and memorial tournaments have been held in his home city for over 100 years. His contribution to chess in Russia was enormous including running chess clubs,lecturing and writing. Chigorin learned to play at the late age of 16 and took a serious interest at the age of 23. He was Russia’s best player and ranked in the top 4 in the world. Here is a brevity.

Knorre,Victor - Chigorin,Mikhail [C50] St Petersburg, 1874
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0–0 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4 g5 8.Bg3 h5 9.Nxg5 h4 10.Nxf7 hxg3 11.Nxd8 Bg4 12.Qd2 Nd4 13.Nc3 Nf3+ 14.gxf3 Bxf3 0–1

The following game was played in the 1892 world championship re-match in Havana, Cuba. The beautiful knight sacrifice on move 19 was praised by Emanuel Lasker (World Champion 1894-1920).

Chigorin,Mikhail - Steinitz,William [C52] Evans Gambit
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.0–0 d6 7.d4 Bg4 8.Bb5 exd4 9.cxd4 Bd7 10.Bb2 Nce7 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7 12.Na3 Nh6 13.Nc4 Bb6 14.a4 c6 15.e5 d5 16.Nd6+ Kf8 17.Ba3 Kg8 18.Rb1 Nhf5 19.Nxf7! Kxf7 20.e6+ Kxe6 21.Ne5 Qc8 22.Re1 Kf6 23.Qh5! g6 24.Bxe7+ Kxe7 25.Nxg6+ Kf6 26.Nxh8 Bxd4 27.Rb3 Qd7 28.Rf3 Rxh8 29.g4 Rg8 30.Qh6+ Rg6 31.Rxf5+ 1–0

Chigorin’s life time record against Steinitz (the first World Champion 1886 - 1894 ) was 24 wins, 27 losses and 8 draws.

Sheroff
31-10-2012, 01:16 PM
Knorre-Chigorin is, move for move, the same as Bruce Williams-Kevin Casey, final round of last year's Gold Coast Lightning tournament. I only steal opening traps from the best...;)

Cheers,
Kevin Casey

peter_parr
05-11-2012, 10:04 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald 5th Nov 2012.

The following game was won by the top seed in the first round of the Chigorin Memorial in St Petersburg, Russia.

Shirov,A ( LAT 2718) - Spielmann,Al ( FRA 2235) [D85] rd 1

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Bd2 Bg7 6.e4 Nb6 7.Be3 0–0 8.Be2 Nc6 9.Nf3 Bg4 10.e5 Qd7 11.h3 Be6 12.Ne4 Rad8 13.Nc5 Qc8 14.Nxe6 Qxe6 15.Qb3 Qxb3 16.axb3 Nd5 17.Bc4 f6 18.0–0 Kh8 19.e6 Nxe3 20.fxe3 Bh6 21.Kf2 a6 22.Rfd1 Nb4 23.e4 Nc2 24.Ra5 Be3+ 25.Ke2 Bxd4 26.Rd5 c5 27.Rd7 b5 28.Bd5 Ne3 29.Nxd4 Nxd5? (29.. cxd4 and black is OK) 30.Nc6 Nf4+ 31.Kf3 Rc8? 32.Kxf4 Rxc6 33.Rxe7 Rfc8 34.Rdd7 c4 35.Rxh7+ Kg8 1–0

Eight players share the lead after round eight with 6.5 points. There is one round to play with 350 contestants including 63 grandmasters.

Capablanca-Fan
07-11-2012, 02:17 AM
Knorre-Chigorin is, move for move, the same as Bruce Williams-Kevin Casey, final round of last year's Gold Coast Lightning tournament. I only steal opening traps from the best...;)
Indeed, it seems to go back to Steinitz, at least in analysis (http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/confusion.html). One attribution is even further back, to Paul Morphy's father Alonzo (http://www.thechessmind.net/storage/chess-posts/lecarpentier_amorphy_1825g0.htm).

I too have stolen this trap. In a rapid game against Richard Glover in the early 1990s in NZ IIRC. The note to move 14 comes from the above link.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0–0 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4 g5 8.Bg3 h5 9.Nxg5 h4 10.Nxf7 hxg3 11.Nxd8 Bg4 12.Qd2 Nd4 13.h3 Ne2+ 14.Kh1 [14.Qxe2 Bxe2 15.Ne6 Bb6 16.Nc3 Bxf1 17.Kxf1 gxf2 18.Na4 Kd7 19.Nxb6+ axb6 20.Ng5=] 14... Rxh3+ 15.gxh3 Bf3# 0–1

In a simul in New Zealand, again in the early 1990s, the late John Erickson took a board against me, and took the rook on move 11. A former South African champion was too strong for me to give a handicap of simul, and he won. Black apparently should obtain the advantage here as well, but I couldn't work it out over the board. There is an ancient corro game:

[Event "corr"]
[Site "corr"]
[Date "1937.??.??"]
[Round "0"]
[White "Martinsen"]
[Black "Jensen"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "C50"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0-0 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4 g5 8.Bg3 h5 9.Nxg5 h4 10.Nxf7 hxg3 11.Nxh8 Bg4 12.Qd2 Nd4 13.hxg3 Kd7 14.Ng6 Qe8
15.Qg5 Ne2+ 16.Kh1 Qxg6 17.Qh4 Rh8 18.Qxh8 Nh7 0-1

peter_parr
12-11-2012, 10:16 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 12th November.

The Chigorin Memorial in St. Petersburg, Russia was won by Alexander Areshchenko (UKR 2710) on tie-break from Bartosz Socko (POL 2610) after both scored 7.5/9 in the 350 player event which included 63 GM’s.

Areshchenko,A (2710) - Makarov,M (2516) [C41]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nd7 4.Bc4 c6 5.0–0 Be7 6.a4 Ngf6 7.Nc3 0–0 8.Re1 a5 9.h3 exd4 10.Nxd4 Nc5 11.Bf4 Qb6 12.b3 Be6 13.Nxe6 fxe6 14.Bxd6 Rad8 15.Bxe7 Rxd1 16.Raxd1 Re8 17.Bd6 h6 18.Kh2 Ncd7 19.e5 Nd5 20.Ne4 Rf8 21.Bxf8 Kxf8 22.f4 Ke7 23.Nd6 Qb4 24.f5 Nxe5 25.Nc8+ Kf6 26.fxe6 Kxe6 27.Re4 Qf8 28.Nb6 Qb8 29.Bxd5+ Kf6 30.Kh1 cxd5 31.Rxe5 ! 1–0

Desmond
12-11-2012, 12:16 PM
^ very nice game

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2012, 12:31 PM
Yep. Black needed 27...Qc5 but still would have been worse. Amusingly if black plays either ...Qd8 or ...Qd6 there are three different easily winning refutations (they all work against both moves), any one of which is sufficient reason for black to resign. Finding all three is a cute mini-tactics exercise.