PDA

View Full Version : FIDE Grand Prix 2012-3 London 21 Sep - 3 Oct



Kevin Bonham
18-09-2012, 09:34 PM
First 2012-3 GP tournament. The winner and runner up of the GP qualify for the Candidates tournament for the World Champs after next, supposed to be held in 2014.

The full list of GP participants:

1. From World Championship Match 2012
GM Boris Gelfand (ISR)

2. From World Cup 2011
GM Peter Svidler (RUS)
GM Alexander Grischuk (RUS)
GM Vasily Ivanchuk (UKR)
GM Ruslan Ponomariov (UKR)

3. By Average Rating (July 2011 + January 2012)
GM Teimour Radjabov (AZE)
GM Sergey Karjakin (RUS)
GM Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
GM Veselin Topalov (BUL)
GM Shakriyar Mamedyarov (AZE)
GM Vugar Gashimov (AZE)

4. FIDE President Nominee
GM Fabiano Caruana (ITA)

5. AGON Nominees
GM Alexander Morozevich (RUS)
GM Wang Hao (CHN)
GM Peter Leko (HUN)
GM Leinier Dominguez Perez (CUB)
GM Anish Giri (NLD)
GM Rustam Kasimdzhanov (UZB)

Carlsen, Anand, Aronian, Kramnik not interested as they will presumably be seeded into Candidates tournament in other ways, if not into the final directly as champion.

McShane, J Polgar, Kasparov (!) invited but declined.

12 play in each event, so each player plays 4 of the 6 events.

London field is:

Karjakin Ivanchuk
Nakamura
Grischuk
Topalov
Wang Hao
Gelfand
Leko
Ponomariov Adams
Mamedyarov
Dominguez
Giri
Kasimdzhanov

Good to see an absence of under-qualified host-city bunnies in this cycle.

Remaining dates

Tashkent 21 Nov -5 Dec
Lisbon 17 Apr - 1 May 2013
Madrid 22 May - 4 June 2013
Berlin 3 - 17 July 2013
Paris 18 Sep - 2 Oct 2013

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2012, 06:51 PM
Not much response to poll so far. Extended voting for a day but closes soon. If there was more interest we could have a GP polling GP in which you score the points for the person you tip each round. :lol:

Boris Gelfand is the sole leader after round 1, playing an excellent game with black against Nakamura:



1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Nd5 Nxd5 8.
exd5 Nb8 9. a4 Be7 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Nd7 12. Kh1 f5 13. f4 a6 14. Na3 exf4 15.
Bxf4 Ne5 16. Qd2 Bd7 17. Qb4 Rb8 18. c4 a5 19. Qb3 Ng6 20. Be3 b6 21. Nb5 Bxb5
22. axb5 Bg5 23. Bg1 Ne5 24. Qa3 Bd2 25. Rad1 Bb4 26. Qh3 Qg5 27. Be3 Qf6 28.
Bd4 Bc5 29. Bc3 Qg5 30. Bxe5 dxe5 31. g4 fxg4 32. Qxg4 Qxg4 33. Bxg4 Bd6 34.
Be6+ Kh8 35. Kg2 g6 36. b3 Kg7 37. h3 e4 38. Bg4 h5 39. Be2 Rf6 40. Rde1 Rf5 41.
Bd1 Rbf8 42. Rxf5 gxf5 43. Bxh5 Kf6 44. Rh1 Kg5 45. Bd1 Kh4 46. Rf1 Rg8+ 47. Kh1
Rg5 48. Bc2 Kxh3 49. Rf2 Kg3 50. Rh2 Rg4 51. Rg2+ Kf4 52. Rf2+ Kg5 53. Rd2 Rg3
54. Re2 Rh3+ 55. Kg1 Kf4 56. Kg2 Rh2+ 57. Kf1 Rxe2 58. Kxe2 Ke5 0-1

Kevin Bonham
23-09-2012, 02:10 PM
Leko has joined Gelfand in the lead, defeating Ivanchuk.

Agent Smith
23-09-2012, 03:40 PM
It's a great field... Just realised it's started already.

Giri and Boris played well in their last tourneys, while Naka seems to have stalled a little.

With the *big* names missing, it'll be an interesting tournament.

Agent Smith
24-09-2012, 07:49 AM
Round three games were all drawn except Giri (black, to move) losing quckly to Mamedyarov with a god-aw-ful position.
2rqk3/1b1nbp2/p3P3/1pp3pr/4N3/6B1/PPQ2PPP/3R1RK1 b - - 0 21
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Qb3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. Qxc4 b5 8. Qc2 Bb7 9. Nbd2 Nbd7 10. e4 Rc8 11. Be2 a6 12. O-O c5 13. d5 exd5 14. e5 g5 15. Bg3 Ne4 16. Nxe4 dxe4 17. Nd2 h5 18. Nxe4 Rh6 19. Rad1 Be7 20. Bxh5 Rxh5 21. e6 1-0

And Topalov's beating up da girls now ;>
http://www.standard.co.uk/incoming/article8163177.ece/ALTERNATES/w620/lily.jpg

peter_parr
24-09-2012, 11:00 AM
The following was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on 24th September 2012.
Check your local major newspaper for similar coverage?


FIDE Grand Prix Kicks Off
Peter Parr

The first stage of the new FIDE Grand Prix is being held at Simpson’s- in- the- Strand restaurant in London. The venue was the centre of chess activity in London throughout the nineteenth century from 1826. The commercial rights for the World Championship cycle for the next eleven years are held by Andrew Paulson an American businessman, director and founder of Agon, with publishing interests in Russia. More than 300 distinguished guests attended the opening ceremony.

Boris Gelfand of Israel, the 2012 World Title Challenger became the sole leader after the first round by defeating Hikaru Nakamura (USA 2783). The other five games were hard fought draws with Ivanchuk trying for 110 moves before agreeing to a draw with Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE 2729). Nakamura recovered in round two to defeat bottom seed former World Champion Rustam Kasimdzhanov (UZB 2684) in round 2. Peter Leko won the following game against Vassily Ivanchuk.

Leko,Peter (2737) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2769) [C11]
1st FIDE GP London 2012 London ENG (2), 22.09.2012
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 a6 8.Qd2 b5 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Ne2 b4 11.Bxc5 Nxc5 12.Ned4 Nxd4 13.Qxd4 Qb6 14.a3 Rb8 15.Be2 a5 16.axb4 axb4 17.0–0 0–0 18.Qe3 Ba6 19.Bxa6 Nxa6 20.Qxb6 Rxb6 21.Kf2 Nb8 22.Ra8 Nc6 23.Rfa1 f6 24.Ke3 fxe5 25.fxe5 h6 26.h4 Rb7 27.h5 Rc7 28.Rxf8+ Kxf8 29.Ra8+ Ke7 30.g4 Nd8 31.Nd4 Nc6 32.Nf3 Kf7? 33.g5 hxg5? 34.Nxg5+ Ke7 35.Rg8 Nxe5 36.Rxg7+ Kd6 37.Rxc7 Kxc7 38.Nxe6+ Kd6 39.Nf4 Kc6 40.Nd3 Ng4+ 41.Kf4 Nf6 42.Kg5 1–0

Leading scores after 2 rounds (12 players, 2739 average rating, 11 rounds, prize fund $ 210,000 ) :- Boris Gelfand ISR 2738 and Peter Leko HUN 2737 each 1.5/2.

The other five tournaments in the GP series will be held in Tashkent, Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin, and Paris. The top two seeds GM Anna Muzychuk SLO 2606 and GM Humpy Koneru IND 2593 share the lead with 5/6 (12 players,11 rounds) in the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix tournament in Ankara, Turkey.

Kevin Bonham
24-09-2012, 12:15 PM
The list of players I originally had for this event was inaccurate but has been fixed.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2012, 12:50 PM
Grischuk beats Mamedyarov very nicely while Wang Hao blunders in the endgame allowing Gelfand to mate.

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=8503

+2 Gelfand
+1 Leko, Grischuk
-1 Kasimdzhanov, Giri, Ivanchuk, Wang Hao
= everybody else

Agent Smith
25-09-2012, 06:06 PM
while Wang Hao blunders in the endgame allowing Gelfand to mate
Everyone gets tired i guess. Must be hard to take when you're a GM.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2012, 06:25 PM
Everyone gets tired i guess. Must be hard to take when you're a GM.

Yes, in the video leading up to the blunder he looks completely exhausted.

Kevin Bonham
26-09-2012, 11:43 AM
Round 5 all draws. Dominguez almost beat Nakamura in the longest game:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nge7 4.Nc3 d6 5.d4 a6 6.Bc4 b5 7.Be2 exd4 8.Nd5 Ne5 9.Qxd4 c5 10.Qd1 Nxd5 11.Qxd5 Be6 12.Qd1 Be7 13.O-O O-O 14.c3 Qb6 15.Ng5 Bc8 16.Qc2 Bb7 17.Rd1 Rad8 18.Nf3 Ng6 19.a4 Bc6 20.axb5 axb5 21.Be3 Rfe8 22.Nd2 Bf8 23.c4 b4 24.Bf1 Be7 25.f3 Nf8 26.Nb3 Ne6 27.Nc1 Bf6 28.Ne2 Be5 29.Qd2 Ra8 30.g3 Ba4 31.Rdc1 g6 32.Bg2 Bg7 33.Bh3 Qc7 34.Rab1 Bb3 35.Bf1 Qe7 36.Nf4 Nd4 37.Kg2 Qf6 38.Be2 Ba2 39.Nd5 Qd8 40.Bxd4 Bxd4 41.Ra1 b3 42.Re1 Qa5 43.Rad1 Bg7 44.Qxa5 Rxa5 45.Rd2 Ra7 46.Bd3 f5 47.Rde2 fxe4 48.Bxe4 Kf8 49.h4 Bd4 50.g4 Kg7 51.g5 Rf7 52.Kg3 Rff8 53.Kg4 Re5 54.Rh1 h6 55.Rhe1 Rfe8 56.Nc7 Rf8 57.Nd5 Rf7 58.Rd2 Re8 59.Ree2 Ref8 60.f4 Rh8 61.Kg3 Ra7 62.Kg2 Re8 63.Bd3 Rxe2+ 64.Rxe2 hxg5 65.hxg5 Kf7 66.Kf3 Bg7 67.Kg4 Rb7 68.Rh2 Rb8 69.Re2 Rb7 70.Rh2 Rb8 71.Nf6 Rh8 72.Rxh8 Bxh8 73.f5 gxf5+ 74.Kxf5 Bg7 75.Be4 Bh8 76.Bd5+ Ke7 77.Be4 Kf7 78.Kf4 Bxf6 79.gxf6 Kxf6 80.Bd3 Ke6 81.Ke4 d5+ 82.cxd5+ Kd6 83.Bc4 Bb1+ 84.Ke3 Bc2 85.Kd2 Be4 86.Bxb3 Bxd5 87.Bxd5 Kxd5 88.Kc3 c4 89.b3 cxb3 90.Kxb3 ˝-˝

Apparently 69. or 71.Bxg6! was winning.

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2012, 02:07 PM
Wang Hao bounced back defeating Nakamura (who he has an excellent record against) with Mamedyarov beating Kasimdzhanov and Topalov beating Dominguez.

+2 Gelfand
+1 Grischuk Topalov Leko Mamedyarov
= Adams, Wang Hao
-1 Ivanchuk Dominguez Giri Nakamura
-2 Kasimdzhanov

Topalov - Dominguez. White, up one pawn, sacs piece for two pawns in endgame and wins.

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 a6 5.Nc3 b5 6.c5 g6 7.Ne5 Bg7 8.f4 Qc7 9.Be2 h5 10.O-O a5 11.a3 Bf5 12.h3 Nbd7 13.Bf3 Ne4 14.Bxe4 dxe4 15.Bd2 Nf6 16.Qe2 Be6 17.b4 axb4 18.axb4 O-O 19.Rfc1 Rfb8 20.Be1 Qc8 21.Kh2 Ra6 22.Bh4 Rba8 23.Rxa6 Qxa6 24.Qe1 Qb7 25.Ra1 Rxa1 26.Qxa1 Nd5 27.Nxd5 Bxd5 28.Qa5 Qc8 29.Bxe7 Qe8 30.Qc7 f6 31.Qd7 Bf7 32.Bxf6 Bxf6 33.Qxc6 Bxe5 34.Qxe8+ Bxe8 35.fxe5 h4 36.d5 Kf7 37.Kg1 Ke7 38.Kf2 g5 39.Ke1 Bf7 40.e6 Bh5 41.Kd2 Kd8 42.d6 g4 43.hxg4 Bxg4 44.e7+ Ke8 45.c6 Be6 46.Kc3 Bd5 47.c7 Bb7 48.Kd4 Kd7 49.Kc5 1-0

Adamski
28-09-2012, 06:35 PM
Naka is having a shocka.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2012, 12:32 AM
Naka is having a shocka.

Early days yet for him in this one.

Why Sofia Rules are Silly, by Chucky and Rustam

Ivanchuk - Kasimdzhanov

1.c4 c6 2.Nf3 d5 3.g3 dxc4 4.Bg2 Nd7 5.a4 Nc5 6.Na3 Be6 7.Qc2 Qd5 8.Nh4 Qd4 9.Nf3 Qd5 10.Nh4 Qd4 11.Nf3 1/2-1/2

Now really, what the hell is all this? The position on move 4 has had recent GM games but then Chucky plays the very dodgy looking near-novelty 5.a4 (chesslive has three games with the only 2000+ one being a game Lependin (2320) - Tregubov (2470), Alekhine op Moscow 1996 won by black). Rustam has every opportunity to play assertively with 7...Nb3 but all he wants is a draw with black so he baits a repetition and it's an early rest day for both. Farcical.

Agent Smith
29-09-2012, 07:41 AM
Early days yet for him in this one.

Why Sofia Rules are Silly, by Chucky and Rustam

Ivanchuk - Kasimdzhanov

1.c4 c6 2.Nf3 d5 3.g3 dxc4 4.Bg2 Nd7 5.a4 Nc5 6.Na3 Be6 7.Qc2 Qd5 8.Nh4 Qd4 9.Nf3 Qd5 10.Nh4 Qd4 11.Nf3 1/2-1/2

Now really, what the hell is all this? The position on move 4 has had recent GM games but then Chucky plays the very dodgy looking near-novelty 5.a4 (chesslive has three games with the only 2000+ one being a game Lependin (2320) - Tregubov (2470), Alekhine op Moscow 1996 won by black). Rustam has every opportunity to play assertively with 7...Nb3 but all he wants is a draw with black so he baits a repetition and it's an early rest day for both. Farcical.
Hmmm - i dont agree. You cant go telling players what move they *should* be playing. This is a legit draw. Chess isn't 20-20.. it *is* a boring game sometimes.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2012, 11:54 AM
Hmmm - i dont agree. You cant go telling players what move they *should* be playing. This is a legit draw. Chess isn't 20-20.. it *is* a boring game sometimes.

The point I'm trying to make here is that Sofia Rules are exactly about telling players what they should do, in order to eradicate early boring draws by draw offers. But instead the players can still have early boring draws by playing ludicrous, easily avoidable early repetitions like this one, thus avoiding both the letter of the Sofia Rules and its intended spirit.

A decision has to be made on underlying principle. If it is acceptable to tell players what not to do in order to stop early agreed draws then it should be acceptable to regulate stuff like this out of existence for the same tournaments. If it is not acceptable to tell players they cannot have "games" like this one then it is just as unacceptable to tell players they cannot agree quick draws.

The reason I singled out this game is to point out that Sofia Rules stop one kind of early gutless draw, but do not stop others, and that this is silly.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2012, 12:04 PM
Gelfand leading on 5/7 (+3) after beating Adams:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 e6 4.O-O Nge7 5.b3 a6 6.Bxc6 Nxc6 7.Bb2 b6 8.d4 cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bb7 10.Nd2 f6 11.Qg4 Kf7 12.Rad1 Qc7 13.Nxc6 Bxc6 14.Qh5+ Kg8 15.Bd4 b5 16.f4 Be7 17.c3 Rf8 18.b4 d6 19.Bf2 e5 20.Rc1 Qb7 21.Rfe1 Be8 22.Qf3 Bf7 23.c4 h5 24.c5 dxc5 25.Bxc5 exf4 26.Qxf4 Bxa2 27.e5 Bxc5+ 28.Rxc5 fxe5 29.Qxe5 Rh6 30.Nf3 Re6 31.Qa1 Rxe1+ 32.Qxe1 Qb6 33.Qe3 Bd5 34.Ng5 Qf6 35.Nf3 Bxf3 36.gxf3 Qxf3 37.Qxf3 Rxf3 38.Kg2 Rf4 39.Rc6 Rxb4 40.Rxa6 Rc4 41.Rb6 b4 42.Rb7 Kh7 43.Rb6 g6 44.Kg3 h4+ 45.Kf3 Kh6 46.Rb5 g5 47.h3 Rc3+ 0-1

Nakamura definitely is having a shocker now; he was beaten by Mamedyarov (who is second on 4.5/7) and has sunk to equal last on 2.5.

The rest were drawn.

pax
29-09-2012, 11:32 PM
Hmmm - i dont agree. You cant go telling players what move they *should* be playing. This is a legit draw. Chess isn't 20-20.. it *is* a boring game sometimes.

A seven move draw is not ok, not when the players are receiving significant appearance money. They are being paid to *play chess*, not to turn up and smile for the cameras.

Magnus Carlsen put it quite nicely here (emphasis mine):
http://www.chessbase.com/newsprint.asp?newsid=8461

"Well, the three-one-oh system is controversial. I think it’s a viable system, but there are advantages and disadvantages. I think it only affects the final score in extreme cases. As for the Sofia rules, whatever you want to call it, I don’t think those rules are controversial at all, I just think at top level tournaments you should play out the games. I think at amateur tournaments, open tournaments, people should be allowed to do whatever they want. At top level tournaments, there’s simply no excuse for not playing out the games."

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2012, 11:30 AM
The two participants in yesterday's sham draw reaped the rewards of a day off by both winning. This is another reason why these sorts of draws are problematic. In a non-Sofia tournament if some GMs start taking quick draws, then all the others can do it too if they want to avoid an energy deficit. But under Sofia rules only some positions lend themselves to a quick repetition.

+3 Gelfand
+2 Mamedyarov
+1 Grischuk, Topalov, Leko
= Ivanchuk, Wang Hao
-1 Giri, Dominguez, Kasimdzhanov
-2 Adams
-3 (uggh) Nakamura

Capablanca-Fan
30-09-2012, 01:30 PM
The reason I singled out this game is to point out that Sofia Rules stop one kind of early gutless draw, but do not stop others, and that this is silly.
Yes, they are silly. The occasional short draw to conserve energy is a non-problem. Even Bronstein defended the practice in his classic Zurich 1953 tournament book, and he could not be accused of being a boring player.

It's easy for young players like Carlsen to claim that all games should be played out. He might think differently when he's 40. I have great respect for people like the late Ortvin Sarapu, who won his 20th NZ title in his mid 60s against the best in the country, because he knew how to conserve energy.

Agent Smith
30-09-2012, 04:23 PM
The two participants in yesterday's sham draw reaped the rewards of a day off by both winning.
I understand your point... short draws short change viewers.

But it's a fact of life, sport, *and* chess - you pick your battles carefully.

If your 2-1 sets ahead in a tennis match, and you're down a break or two in the 4th. You switch to cruise mode a little, and save your energy for the 5th set.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2012, 04:57 PM
I understand your point... short draws short change viewers.

No, that is not my point at all. My point is that there are tournament rules that are designed to prevent short draws because they short-change viewers. But such rules don't make sense if players can have a short draw anyway just by taking a quick repetition. I think if you are going to stop one kind of short draw you should find some way to stop them all.

I am not saying that there should, or shouldn't, be rules against short draws in such tournaments. What I am saying is that it is a complete farce to have rules against short draws which target soft draws by agreement but do not stop repetition draws like this. Indeed the repetition draws that do occur are even worse than the short agreed draws because they are so artificial.

Agent Smith
30-09-2012, 08:31 PM
No, that is not my point at all. My point is that there are tournament rules that are designed to prevent short draws because they short-change viewers. But such rules don't make sense if players can have a short draw anyway just by taking a quick repetition. I think if you are going to stop one kind of short draw you should find some way to stop them all.

I am not saying that there should, or shouldn't, be rules against short draws in such tournaments. What I am saying is that it is a complete farce to have rules against short draws which target soft draws by agreement but do not stop repetition draws like this. Indeed the repetition draws that do occur are even worse than the short agreed draws because they are so artificial.
Sorry to continue this digression... So you're just having a whinge - without having a solution ? :)

I'm kindof happy to accept how it is. If player want short draws and are allowed, or if they want to contrive a draw by three-fold-rep, then let them. Ultimately, the game is about the players, not the spectators.

I think you're just a beurocrat through and through, and cant stand to see those lazy ldlers get away with it. :) .... Of course i'll shut up if you want me too :whistle:

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2012, 09:05 PM
Sorry to continue this digression... So you're just having a whinge - without having a solution ? :)

No, that's wrong as well. There are two alternative solutions:

(i) Don't have Sofia Rules at all - let players draw by agreement whenever they like so long as the game is not pre-arranged.

(ii) Refine Sofia Rules so that they include that the players cannot draw by repeating moves without the arbiter's permission. This would require changes to the Laws of Chess to allow such an option. (The Doeberl Cup was actually run using such a rule a few years ago but the rule was illegal under the Laws as they stood. Nonetheless the organisers successfully enforced it against GM Akobian when he tried to take an early repetition in his last round game.)


I'm kindof happy to accept how it is. If player want short draws and are allowed, or if they want to contrive a draw by three-fold-rep, then let them.

I'm kind of not happy to accept how it is, because it is an inconsistent farce that allows stupid contrived repetitions like this one - I'd rather they just drew by agreement in half a dozen moves so that everyone could see it for what it was. If there is going to be a let-it-go attitude that should apply to all short draws, not just short draws by repetition.


I think you're just a beurocrat through and through, and cant stand to see those lazy ldlers get away with it. :) .... Of course i'll shut up if you want me too :whistle:

I certainly want you to stop making a fool of yourself by strawmanning my position then resorting to silly personal insults, since it makes you look silly and wastes my time too. My objection is to the rule because it is a bad one. It's not surprising that players take advantage of a bad rule, but it's farcical that the real bureaucrats (correct spelling) allow it to stay the way it is, thus permitting them to do so. Especially when so many federation delegates at the Congress were grandstanding about a stupid proposal to ban all agreed draws (even in tournaments that want to allow them) when the current method of preventing agreed draws does not even stop stuff like this.

If you would make a serious attempt not to misrepresent my position in any further comments I'd appreciate that. Ta.

pax
30-09-2012, 10:11 PM
I'm kindof happy to accept how it is. If player want short draws and are allowed, or if they want to contrive a draw by three-fold-rep, then let them. Ultimately, the game is about the players, not the spectators.

Not when the players are paid significant appearance money. Actually the biggest incentive for players not to make a habit of making boring draws is that they could end up getting fewer invitations to the big events.

Capablanca-Fan
01-10-2012, 04:30 AM
Not when the players are paid significant appearance money. Actually the biggest incentive for players not to make a habit of making boring draws is that they could end up getting fewer invitations to the big events.
Exactly! So why bother with unworkable rules? Also, the stupid rules have been applied to ordinary Australian events where most people pay to play.

pax
02-10-2012, 12:09 AM
Exactly! So why bother with unworkable rules? Also, the stupid rules have been applied to ordinary Australian events where most people pay to play.

I don't agree with that at all, but I do think the Sofia rules are quite appropriate where all players receive appearance money. It says to the players "you are being paid to play eleven games of chess - so play them!" They do need a better approach to repetition, however.

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2012, 01:03 AM
Kasimdzhanov - Adams was interesting in that, as TWIC points out, without Sofia rules they may well have just agreed a draw but instead black self-destructed:

1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 e6 3.g3 dxc4 4.Qa4+ Nd7 5.Qxc4 a6 6.Bg2 b5 7.Qc6 Rb8 8.Qc2 Bb7 9.O-O Ngf6 10.d3 Be7 11.a4 O-O 12.axb5 axb5 13.Nc3 b4 14.Na4 c5 15.b3 Nd5 16.Bb2 N5b6 17.Nd2 Bxg2 18.Kxg2 Ra8 19.Nxb6 Nxb6 20.Nf3 Qc7 21.Rfc1 Qb7 22.d4 Rfc8 23.dxc5 Rxc5 24.Qd3 Rxc1 25.Rxc1 Nd5 26.Rc4 Rc8 27.Qe4 h6 28.h4 Qa6 29.Ne5 Bf6 30.Nd3 Bxb2 31.Nxb2 Rxc4 32.Qxc4 Qa2 33.Na4 Qd2 34.Nc5 g6 35.Nd7 Qc3 36.Qa6 Kh7 37.Qa8 h5 38.Qe8 Qg7 39.e4 Nf6 40.Nxf6+ Qxf6 41.Qf8 e5 42.Qxb4 g5 43.hxg5 Qxg5 44.Qc3 h4 45.Qf3 hxg3 46.Qxf7+ Kh8 47.Qf8+ 1-0

Yesterday was a rest day; round 9 now underway.

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2012, 03:39 AM
Gelfand has been completely walloped by Grischuk while Nakamura has collected an Audi by losing to Adams. Rest all still going.

Capablanca-Fan
02-10-2012, 04:47 AM
Refine Sofia Rules so that they include that the players cannot draw by repeating moves without the arbiter's permission. This would require changes to the Laws of Chess to allow such an option. (The Doeberl Cup was actually run using such a rule a few years ago but the rule was illegal under the Laws as they stood. Nonetheless the organisers successfully enforced it against GM Akobian when he tried to take an early repetition in his last round game.)
Yes, that was an illegal enforcement by dilletantes backed up by hypocritical draw-kings, which actually benefited Akobian and hurt his opponent Antić. The discussion is in this thread (http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=7035&page=20).

peter_parr
02-10-2012, 11:19 AM
Published in Sydney Morning Herald 1st Oct 2012

Boris Gelfand, the 2012 World Title Challenger, leads the FIDE Grand Prix in London with three rounds left to play.

Mamedyarov,Shakhriyar (2729) - Giri,Anish (2730) [D11] Rd 3
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 dxc4 7.Qxc4 b5 8.Qc2 Bb7 9.Nbd2 Nbd7 10.e4 Rc8 ? 11.Be2 a6 12.0–0 c5 13.d5 exd5? 14.e5 g5 15.Bg3! Ne4 16.Nxe4 dxe4 17.Nd2 h5 18.Nxe4 Rh6 19.Rad1 Be7 20.Bxh5! Rxh5 21.e6 1–0 (after 21 ..fxe6 22 Nd6+ Bxd6 23 Qg6+ wins)

Leading scores after round eight (12 players, 2739 average rating, 11 rounds):- B.Gelfand (ISR 2738) 5.5, S.Mamedyarov (AZE 2729) 5, A.Grischuk (RUS 2754), V.Topalov (BUL 2752), P.Leko (HUN 2737) 4.5. Hikaru Nakamura (USA 2783), the top seed, has lost his last three games and is in last place with 2.5 points. Leading final scores in the FIDE Women’s Grand Prix in Ankara, Turkey (12 players, 11 rounds):- H.Koneru (IND 2593) 8.5, A.Muzychuk (SLO 2606) 8, Zhao Xue (CHN 2549) 7.5.

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2012, 01:27 PM
Chessbase reports Grischuk only just made it to his game in time. Mamedyarov and Topalov both won

+3 Mamedyarov
+2 Grischuk, Topalov, Gelfand
+1 Leko
= Wang Hao
-1 Giri, Kasimdzhanov, Ivanchuk, Adams
-2 Dominguez
-4 Nakamura

Adamski
03-10-2012, 12:24 AM
Naka's shocka gets shockinger! But he will bounce back next major tournament for sure.

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2012, 02:13 AM
Wang Hao - Mamedyarov had a pretty quick 32-move draw, guaranteeing Mamedyarov will take at least a share of the lead into the final round. Other games still going between moves 21 and 34 at present.

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2012, 11:25 AM
Some small relief for Nakamura with a win over Giri. That was the only win of the day so Mamedyarov takes a half-point lead into the final round .

Adamski
03-10-2012, 09:49 PM
Some small relief for Nakamura with a win over Giri. That was the only win of the day so Mamedyarov takes a half-point lead into the final round .
Pleased for Nakamura who needed some good news.

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2012, 11:54 PM
Mamedyarov has drawn in the last round thus guaranteeing at least =1st; he is waiting to see if Grischuk, Topalov or Gelfand can join him.

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2012, 01:01 AM
Props to Jono for tipping Gelfand who has tied for first with Mamedyarov and Topalov. Grischuk drew.

Gelfand - Kasimdzhanov. Some good play by Gelfand who sacrificed the exchange early and generally had plenty of play for it. Just as he is about to convert he misses the crusher on move 41 (possibly because of only just making the move 40 time control) but then Kasimdzhanov just bins his position with over an hour on his clock! I was expecting a prolonged endgame and that the conversion might be difficult.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 e6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 g6 8.Be2 Bg7 9.e4 dxe4 10.Nxe4 Qf4 11.Qc2 0-0 12.0-0 c5 13.dxc5 Bd7 14.b4 Bxa1 15.Rxa1 Bc6 16.Nd6 Nd7 17.Qc1 Qf6 18.Rb1 g5 19.Qe3 Rad8 20.Nd4 a6 21.Re1 Ne5 22.h3 Ba4 23.Qa3 Nc6 24.Nf3 Bc2 25.b5 axb5 26.cxb5 Ra8 27.Qc1 Nb4 28.Qd2 Qf4 29.Qxf4 gxf4 30.Nxb7 Rxa2 31.c6 Rfa8 32.Nd6 Bd3 33.Bxd3 Nxd3 34.Rf1 Rc2 35.Nd4 Rc5 36.b6 Nb4 37.c7 Rf8 38.Rb1 Na6 39.N4b5 Rc6 40.b7 Nxc7 41.Nxc7 [41.Nc8!] 41...Rxd6 42.b8=Q Rxb8 43.Rxb8+ Kh7 44.Rb4 Rd1+ 45.Kh2 e5 46.Ne8 f5 47.Rb7+ Kg6 48.Rg7+ 1-0

Giri - Topalov. Convincingly converted.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 Nbd7 7.Be2 dxc4 8.0-0 c5 9.dxc5 Nxc5 10.Bxc4 Qxd1 11.Rfxd1 b6 12.Nd4 Bb7 13.Rac1 a6 14.b4 Nce4 15.Nxe4 Bxe4 16.a3 a5 17.f3 Bd5 18.e4 Bxc4 19.Rxc4 axb4 20.axb4 Rfc8 21.Rdc1 Rxc4 22.Rxc4 h6 23.Kf1 Kf8 24.Nc6 b5 25.Rd4 Ra6 26.Nxe7 Kxe7 27.Rd2 Nd7 28.Rc2 g5 29.Bc7 f6 30.Ba5 h5 31.h4 gxh4 32.Rc8 Ne5 33.Rc7+ Kd6 34.Rb7 h3 35.gxh3 Nxf3 36.Rxb5 Nd2+ 37.Kg2 Ra8 38.Rxh5 Rg8+ 39.Kf2 Nxe4+ 40.Ke3 f5 41.Rh7 e5 42.Bc7+ Ke6 43.Kd3 Rg3+ 44.Kc4 Rc3+ 45.Kb5 f4 46.Rh6+ Kd5 47.Bb6 f3 48.Rh8 Ra3 49.Bg1 f2 50.Bxf2 Nxf2 51.Rd8+ Ke4 52.Kc6 Rc3+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2012, 01:11 AM
Think these are the final standings:

+3 Mamedyarov, Topalov, Gelfand
+2 Grischuk
+1 Leko
= Wang Hao
-1 Ivanchuk, Adams
-2 Dominguez, Kasimdzhanov
-3 Nakamura, Giri

The only good news for Nakamura is that you get to discard your worst score.

I find these GPs to be quite lively tournaments generally and I think the change from 14 players/tournament to 12 is a good one.

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2012, 01:20 AM
I do have to question Rustam's inclusion in the cycle as an "AGON Nominee" a bit. Sure he's a fun player and a great fighter but he's not even in the world top 50 anymore and has been below 2700 since March 2010. There has to be some limit to the number of times he can dine out on winning one of those silly FIDE knockouts nearly a decade ago.

peter_parr
08-10-2012, 09:59 AM
The following article was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on Monday 8th October.

Triple-Tie in London Grand Prix
Peter Parr

Former World Champion Veselin Topalov, the 2012 World Title Challenger Boris Gelfand and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov tied for first place in the FIDE Grand Prix tournament in London.
Grischuk,A (2754) - Gelfand,B (2738) [B23] (9)
1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nd4 4.Nf3 e6 5.0–0 a6 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.Be2 Nd4 8.Bd3 Nc6 9.b3 d6 10.Bb2 Nf6 11.Re1 Be7 12.e5 dxe5 13.Nxe5 Bd7 14.Ne4 Nxe5 15.Bxe5 Bc6 16.Qf3! Rc8 17.Re3! b5 18.Rae1 c4 19.bxc4 bxc4 20.Bxf6 Bxe4 21.Rxe4 Bxf6 22.Bxc4 Qxd2? 23.Bxe6! fxe6 24.Rxe6+ Kd7 25.Qg4 Kc7 26.Qc4+ Kd7 27.Qa4+ Kd8 28.Qxa6 Kd7 29.Qb5+ Kd8 30.Re8+ 1–0 (30.. Rxe8 31 Rxe8+ Kc7 32 Qc5+ wins).

Final scores (12 players, 2739 average rating, 11 rounds):- V.Topalov (BUL 2752), B.Gelfand (ISR 2738), S.Mamedyarov (AZE 2729) 7, A.Grischuk (RUS 2754) 6.5, P.Leko (HUN 2737) 6, Wang Hao (CHN 2742) 5.5. The Grand Slam Masters Final resumes tonight 8 Oct in Bilbao, Spain. Fabiano Caruana leads with 3 wins and 2 draws in the first half last week (rating performance 3023) in Sao Paulo, Brazil well above the World Champion Anand and World no 1 Carlsen and World no 2 Aronian.