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Kevin Bonham
07-07-2012, 12:08 AM
Just posting to show the World Rapid exists! There was some discussion about it as concerns IA norms in another thread. Anyway there won't be any need for those in this case since the arbiter is the veteran IA/IM Filipowicz (who I played and just lost to in a very enjoyable blitz game at the congress tournament last year.)

Both events are headed in seedings by Carlsen, Radjabov, Karjakin, Morozevich, Ivanchuk, Grischuk, Topalov, Svidler, Gelfand. Mamedyarov is also in both and there are six lower-ranked players including some locals in one but not the other (well, mostly lower ranked since Bologan is just ahead of Mamedyarov.) Some of the lower-ranked players are qualifiers.

Rules:


The World Rapid Chess Championship will be played in three days as a round-robin event with five rounds per day. Time controls are 15 minutes for all moves plus 10 seconds increment per move. The World Blitz is a sixteen-player double round robin with 15 rounds per day. The time control is three minutes + two seconds increment per move.

and


Tiebreak rules for first place: (a) results between the players involved; (b) number of wins; (c) Sonneborn-Berger [sic] score; (d) Sudden death game: 5 min vs 4 min.

(A little disappointing to see armageddon without increments, if that is correct.)

After 4 rounds in the rapid Karjakin 4, Carlsen 3.5, Grischuk and Topalov 3, Radjabov and Dreev 2.5.

Max Illingworth
07-07-2012, 12:51 AM
Now Carlsen and Karjakin are in equal first on 4.5/5, with Carlsen having played slightly higher-rated opponents so far. See the ChessVibes report (http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/carlsen-karjakin-lead-world-rapid-championship-after-day-1) for games and other information.

Kevin Bonham
09-07-2012, 05:38 PM
Karjakin won with 11.5/15 after Carlsen lost to Ivanchuk and Grischuk in consecutive rounds and wound up second on 10.5.

ER
09-07-2012, 08:34 PM
Karjakin won with 11.5/15 after Carlsen lost to Ivanchuk and Grischuk in consecutive rounds and wound up second on 10.5.

Grischuk, Morozevich and Lekkas are capable of anything! If they could only concentrate on chess! To be fair to Lekkas he has prioritised his studies which is understandable and commendable!

Agent Smith
09-07-2012, 08:54 PM
I suppose it's good for world chess to see Topalov playing strongly again.

3rr1Q1/4kP2/2pp1b2/1p1P3p/1P5P/1n6/1q6/3RB1RK w - - 3 40
White to move Topalov, V (2752) -- Radjabov, T (2788)
Computer move is 40. f8=N but Topalov played 40. f8=Q (40. ... Rxf8 41. Qe6#)


World Rapid Final
Astana KAZ, 2012.07.06 - 2012.07.08
1: Karjakin, Sergey 11.5 / 15
2: Carlsen, M 10.5 / 15
3: Topalov, V 9.5 / 15
4: Mamedyarov, S 9.5 / 15
5: Grischuk, A 9.0 / 15
6: Gelfand, B 8.0 / 15

peter_parr
10-07-2012, 01:23 PM
See SMH 9 Jul 2012 (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2012.htm)

Garrett
10-07-2012, 01:44 PM
See SMH 9 Jul 2012 (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2012.htm)

"
Leading scores in the World Rapid Championship in Astana, Kazakhstan after 10 rounds ( 16 players, 15 rounds) :- World no 1 M.Carlsen (NOR 2837) 8.5 , S.Karjakin (RUS 2779) , V.Topalov (BUL 2752) 7, S.Mamedyarov (AZE 2726) 6. Carlsen is dominating the event with seven wins and three draws. The Asian Youth Championship with 308 boys and girls in 12 divisions were held in Hikkaduwa, Sri Lanka. Christian Kashish of Sydney scored 5/9 in the Girls under 12 division. Kashish won the NSW Under 12 Championship in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Grandmaster David Smerdon (AUS 2507) has won his first two games at the Curacao Festival in the Caribbean.

"

Kevin Bonham
10-07-2012, 03:24 PM
I suppose it's good for world chess to see Topalov playing strongly again.

Yes, I suppose I should agree in equal tones of semi-enthusiasm. But it is even better to see him playing like this:

Tkachiev - Topalov

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. Bg5 Bg4 8.
Nbd2 Re8 9. c3 Nbd7 10. Qc2 h6 11. Bh4 c6 12. Rae1 Qc7 13. Bg3 Nh5 14. Bh7+ Kf8
15. Bxd6+ Qxd6 16. Bf5 Bxf5 17. Qxf5 g6 18. Qb1 Nhf6 19. g3 a5 20. a4 Rxe1 21.
Rxe1 Re8 22. Rxe8+ Nxe8 23. Qd1 Qe6 24. Nb3 b6 25. Nc1 Nd6 26. Nd3 Kg7 27. Nfe5
Nxe5 28. Nxe5 Nf5 29. Qg4 c5 30. h4 cxd4 31. cxd4 h5 32. Qf4 f6 33. Nf3 Qd6 34.
Qxd6 Nxd6 35. Kf1 Kf7 36. Ke2 Ke6 37. b3 Kf5 38. Nd2 Kg4 39. Nb1 Nf5 40. Nc3
Nxd4+ 41. Kf1 Nxb3 42. Nxd5 Kf3 43. Nxb6 Nd2+ 44. Kg1 Ne4 45. Nc4 Nxf2 46. Kh2
Ng4+ 47. Kg1 Kxg3 48. Nxa5 Ne5 49. Nb7 Kxh4 50. a5 Nc6 51. Kf2 g5 52. a6 g4 53.
Nd8 Na7 54. Ne6 g3+ 55. Kf3 Kh3 56. Nf4+ Kh2 57. Ng2 Nc6 58. Nh4 Kh3 59. Ng2 h4
60. Ne3 f5 61. Ng2 Na7 62. Ne3 Nb5 63. Ng2 Nd4+ 64. Ke3 Nb5 65. Kf3 Nc7 66. a7
Na8 67. Ne3 f4 68. Ng2 Kh2 69. Nxh4 Nc7 70. Ng2 Kh3 71. Nxf4+ Kh2 72. Ng2 Kh3
73. Ne3 Na8 74. Ke4 Nc7 75. Kd3 Kh2 76. Kc4 Kg1 77. Nf5 Kf2 78. Nxg3 Kxg3 79.
Kc5 Kf4 80. Kc6 Na8 81. Kb7 1-0

I do not know if a world class player, or even a player of any class, has ever played a knight ending worse than that.

Desmond
10-07-2012, 03:32 PM
I do not know if a world class player, or even a player of any class, has ever played a knight ending worse than that.Ouch, yeah that's truly a horrible beat.

Agent Smith
10-07-2012, 03:57 PM
Yes - i was monitoring that game live, couldnt believe he lost that.
... But rapid is tough :cool:

Kevin Bonham
10-07-2012, 05:50 PM
Blitz at the halfway stage led by Grischuk 10.5/15 ahead of Andreikin, Ivanchuk and Karjakin 9.5, Carlsen 8.5, Radjabov, Morozevich and Chadaev (of whom I have never heard before!) 8. Topalov and Mamedyarov going poorly =14th-15th on 5.5/15.

[EDIT: correct errors caused by incorrectly thinking tournament was RR not 2RR.]

Max Illingworth
10-07-2012, 05:53 PM
Don't write the tournament off as over; there's 15 rounds to go!

Kevin Bonham
10-07-2012, 05:56 PM
Don't write the tournament off as over; there's 15 rounds to go!

Fixed that, ta.

Capablanca-Fan
11-07-2012, 02:40 PM
Yes, I suppose I should agree in equal tones of semi-enthusiasm. But it is even better to see him playing like this:

Tkachiev - Topalov

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. Bg5 Bg4 8.
Nbd2 Re8 9. c3 Nbd7 10. Qc2 h6 11. Bh4 c6 12. Rae1 Qc7 13. Bg3 Nh5 14. Bh7+ Kf8
15. Bxd6+ Qxd6 16. Bf5 Bxf5 17. Qxf5 g6 18. Qb1 Nhf6 19. g3 a5 20. a4 Rxe1 21.
Rxe1 Re8 22. Rxe8+ Nxe8 23. Qd1 Qe6 24. Nb3 b6 25. Nc1 Nd6 26. Nd3 Kg7 27. Nfe5
Nxe5 28. Nxe5 Nf5 29. Qg4 c5 30. h4 cxd4 31. cxd4 h5 32. Qf4 f6 33. Nf3 Qd6 34.
Qxd6 Nxd6 35. Kf1 Kf7 36. Ke2 Ke6 37. b3 Kf5 38. Nd2 Kg4 39. Nb1 Nf5 40. Nc3
Nxd4+ 41. Kf1 Nxb3 42. Nxd5 Kf3 43. Nxb6 Nd2+ 44. Kg1 Ne4 45. Nc4 Nxf2 46. Kh2
Ng4+ 47. Kg1 Kxg3 48. Nxa5 Ne5 49. Nb7 Kxh4 50. a5 Nc6 51. Kf2 g5 52. a6 g4 53.
Nd8 Na7 54. Ne6 g3+ 55. Kf3 Kh3 56. Nf4+ Kh2 57. Ng2 Nc6 58. Nh4 Kh3 59. Ng2 h4
60. Ne3 f5 61. Ng2 Na7 62. Ne3 Nb5 63. Ng2 Nd4+ 64. Ke3 Nb5 65. Kf3 Nc7 66. a7
Na8 67. Ne3 f4 68. Ng2 Kh2 69. Nxh4 Nc7 70. Ng2 Kh3 71. Nxf4+ Kh2 72. Ng2 Kh3
73. Ne3 Na8 74. Ke4 Nc7 75. Kd3 Kh2 76. Kc4 Kg1 77. Nf5 Kf2 78. Nxg3 Kxg3 79.
Kc5 Kf4 80. Kc6 Na8 81. Kb7 1-0

I do not know if a world class player, or even a player of any class, has ever played a knight ending worse than that.
Abominable. But then White is also an extremely strong player, and allowed himself to be outplayed from an almost dead drawn middlegame and early endgame.

Kevin Bonham
11-07-2012, 07:58 PM
Carlsen put in a big surge on the second day but fell half a point short.

20/30 Grischuk
19.5 Carlsen
18.5 Karjakin
17.5 Morozevich
17 Andreikin, Radjabov
16.5 Le Quang Liem
15 Svidler, Ivanchuk (second day was a disaster for Ivanchuk)

etc

Agent Smith
18-07-2012, 01:01 PM
Ian featured this game in the Byron Bay Echo - notable because Radjabov (at sometime) dared Carlsen to play 1. a4 which he did in this game, and at games end, probable deciding end is A-pawn threatens promotion because black is so tied up!

[Event "World Blitz Final"]
[Site "Astana KAZ"]
[Date "2012.07.10"]
[Round "27"]
[White "Carlsen, M"]
[Black "Radjabov, T"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2837"]
[BlackElo "2788"]
[ECO "A00"]
[EventDate "2012.07.01"]
[Annotator "Rogers"]

1.a4 e5 2.e4 Nf6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.Nf3 Bb4 5.Bb5 O-O 6.O-O d6 7.d3 Bg4 8.Ne2
8...a6
( 8...Bxf3 9.gxf3 -- 10.f4 )
9.Bxc6 bxc6 10.Ng3 Nh5 11.h3 Nxg3 12.fxg3 Bd7 13.g4 Bc5+ 14.Kh1 Qe7 15.Qe1
f6 16.Nh4 g6 17.Bh6 Rf7 18.Rb1 Bb6 19.b3 d5 20.Nf3 Re8 21.Qg3 Bc5 22.Rbe1
dxe4 23.dxe4 Bd6 24.Re2 c5 25.Nd2 Be6 26.Qd3 g5
27.Qxa6 Kh8 28.Nc4 Bxc4 29.Qxc4 Rg8 30.h4 gxh4 31.g5 Rg6 32.Ref2
{Black can barely move, so the White a pawn will advance unhinderd - a
triumph for 1. a4!}
1-0

Kevin Bonham
18-07-2012, 10:39 PM
Excellent!

After 5.Bb5 it's just a Spanish Four Knights with 5.a4, which is probably far from being the most ridiculous possible move in that position.

Agent Smith
19-07-2012, 07:31 AM
Here's the million base tree (without Carlsen's game) for 1. a4 e5
10 games out of 1,749,371 with white winning only 20% of the time.

Kevin Bonham
19-07-2012, 02:35 PM
Here's the million base tree (without Carlsen's game) for 1. a4 e5
10 games out of 1,749,371 with white winning only 20% of the time.

Doesn't surprise me. Probably more a reflection on the likelihood that if a game starts 1.a4 e5 then white is likely to be a worse player than black and lose for that reason, than a reflection on the merits (or not) of that move.

Similarly some dodgy gambits with cult followings can have outstanding database stats not because they are necessarily objectively good but because they are typically played by players who know them very well against players who don't know them.

Agent Smith
19-07-2012, 05:09 PM
Doesn't surprise me. Probably more a reflection on the likelihood that if a game starts 1.a4 e5 then white is likely to be a worse player than black and lose for that reason, than a reflection on the merits (or not) of that move.

Similarly some dodgy gambits with cult followings can have outstanding database stats not because they are necessarily objectively good but because they are typically played by players who know them very well against players who don't know them.
Yes, you're probably right and i was thinking the same... but then Million base is from chessbase i *think*, and doesnt have too many slacker games.

But there's an interesting twist. The one game 1-0 is actually misrecorded.
It is a (very amateurish) win to black. So the score is actually 10% :eh:

Here's the ten games

Iglesias, Ale 0 Barbero, G. 0 0-1 (33) 1989 Argentina A00
Madina, Marti 0 Hernandez Pen 0 =-= (55) 1995 Buenos Aires A00
Nirav, R. 2255 Suvrajit, S. 2205 =-= (11) 1996 Calcutta open A00
Lumumba, Mois 0 Horvitz, Rich 0 0-1 (36) 1980 MOTCF,OH A00
Aquisap, Aman 0 Wall 0 0-1 (24) 1987 Mt View,CA A00
Ware, P. 0 Delmar, E. 0 0-1 (57) 1880 New York A00
Czovek, K jr 0 Eberth, Z. 0 1-0 (19) 1981 Onga A00
Kiltti, Jyrki 0 Vatanski, Ale 0 0-1 (33) 1996 Vantaa We Remi A00
Miranda Saave 0 Iglesias List 0 0-1 (31) 2002 Ferrol ESP A00
Norsworthy, E 0 Mattfeld, Eri 0 0-1 (23) 1996 corr IECG Cat-M A00