PDA

View Full Version : Take care when exchanging into pure pawn endings!



Kevin Bonham
12-06-2012, 10:51 AM
I think this is a general lesson so important especially to many (but by no means all) U1500 players that it deserves a thread of its own even though there is another pure pawn thread at present.

This weekend in the Tas Open I had a couple of difficult games, one against a player rated much lower than me and one against an unrated player. Both had played well, the unrated player even missed a win, and in each case a rook ending was reached. One of the endings was pretty obviously drawn and in the other I was a pawn up with winning chances but there was still plenty of fight left in black's position.

In both cases the opponent completely unnecessarily allowed me to exchange rooks into a pawn ending that was an easy win for me. Both of them did it with heaps of time on the clock, spending not much time analysing the position, and wasted their efforts of hours with a single thoughtless move.

I don't know why people do this so often. I've lost count of the number of games I've won or seen won through the needless exchange of the last piece leaving a pawn ending.

Things to remember here.

* Pawn endings are very unbalanced. Often the exchange of the last piece will change a position from a draw to a win for one side.

* Most likely if you do go into a pure pawn ending you are not going to need that much time to play it out, especially if you've already analysed it. You can usually afford to get down to a few minutes (especially if there's a decent increment) deciding whether or not to exchange. If during that time you decide not to exchange because the pawn ending would be a loss, then yes, you are playing on short of time, but that is better than playing on with lots of time on your clock in a dead lost position.

* Many pure pawn endings can be calculated quickly, leaving even less excuse for exchanging into one without trying to analyse it out. However, others are incredibly complex, especially some of those that end up with both sides promoting. If you're worried that deciding whether or not to go into an unclear pawn ending from a given position will really burn up too much time as you weren't able to calculate the outcome more or less right away, then a simple option is: if in doubt, don't do it. Especially not if the outcome of the game is otherwise looking OK for you (eg if you should draw against a higher-rated player with the material kept on.)

* Just as you should be careful about exchanging off into a pure pawn ending, so you should also be careful about allowing the opponent to force an exchange. Putting your rook behind your king where your opponent can check and get rooks off is a common example.

No point playing a mostly excellent game and then falling at the final hurdle - especially not if you want to get your rating up! Your rating doesn't say how well you played most of the game, all it cares about is the result.

Igor_Goldenberg
12-06-2012, 04:21 PM
Happens at every level. Bobby Cheng against Leonid Sandler (Vic champ 2012) allowed an exchange from slightly better/roughly equal rook ending to a lost pawn ending.

Capablanca-Fan
13-06-2012, 01:49 AM
A very promising thread, with good thoughts above. All we need now are some concrete examples. To give a contrary case, here is Réti swapping rooks against Alekhine (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1148870), because he foresaw that the pawn endgame is drawn.

Most of the time, it's not a good idea. Less experienced players don't realize that an otherwise ordinary P endgame with am extra outside passed P is easier to win than an ordinary middlegame a rook ahead. There might also be an effect often seen in simuls: the weaker player loses a little material then just happily swaps off most pieces making a very easy endgame win for the stronger player. Maybe the former thinks he is "holding out longer", and many beginners think that a longer holdout means greater skill, but in reality it's very weak resistance.

pax
13-06-2012, 07:30 PM
Most of the time, it's not a good idea. Less experienced players don't realize that an otherwise ordinary P endgame with am extra outside passed P is easier to win than an ordinary middlegame a rook ahead. There might also be an effect often seen in simuls: the weaker player loses a little material then just happily swaps off most pieces making a very easy endgame win for the stronger player. Maybe the former thinks he is "holding out longer", and many beginners think that a longer holdout means greater skill, but in reality it's very weak resistance.


I can recall this very thought process when playing as a junior against a much stronger player. Material was level, and I can remember thinking that each exchange was getting me closer to the draw I was seeking when in fact I was just playing myself into a lost endgame (though not a purely pawn game) that I didn't fully understand. I think the mistake is in thinking of "king vs king" as the objective in seeking a draw rather than simply a protected position where the opponent cannot make progress.

Igor_Goldenberg
15-06-2012, 01:59 PM
Many players neglect studying basic endings. Indeed, when it happens on the board they often are able to work it out. However, if you know the basic ending, you can determine:
a) whether you can swap into it.
b) what kind of ending you need to be aiming for.

Capablanca-Fan
16-06-2012, 02:13 PM
Many players neglect studying basic endings. Indeed, when it happens on the board they often are able to work it out. However, if you know the basic ending, you can determine:
a) whether you can swap into it.
b) what kind of ending you need to be aiming for.
Indeed. I'm actually mystified. Most of my serious chess was played under the unlamented adjournment system, where people could look up many endgame positions. Of course, what you say is true, that they would need to foresee what the endgame would be. Now that this outside help is impossible, one would think that players would be more motivated to study the endgame techniques more thoroughly. It doesn't seem to have happened though.

Kevin Bonham
16-06-2012, 03:55 PM
These are my examples from last weekend:

8/2k5/pp1r2p1/4K2p/5P1P/PPR5/8/8 b - - 0 55

Black played 55...Rc6?? losing instead of 55...Kd7 which is pretty much dead drawn (barring the same sort of blunder later).

4r3/pp6/5k2/3R2p1/5p2/7P/PPP2KP1/8 b - - 0 32

White was the exchange up but has just given up the exchange for a pawn on d5. Black plays 32...Re5?? losing. (I would expect to probably win this with white anyway against an inexperienced opponent but not against someone who knew what they were doing. Indeed in the latter case I would not have exchanged into this position in the first place.)

Kevin Bonham
18-06-2012, 02:17 PM
Cheng - Morris, as just published on Kerry's blog (assuming moves as given are correct), is a rather advanced and difficult example:

1.d7 Bxd7 2.Kf2 f4 3.h4 a5 4.Ke2 Kc7 5.Nxd7 Rxd7 6.Rxd7+ Kxd7 7.Kd3 Kc6 8.Kc4 Kb6 9.a3 Kc6 10.a4 h5 11.Kd4 1/2-1/2??

Black's ...Bxd7 is at least risky because it gives white the option of exchanging into the pawn ending, and while the outcome if this occurs immediately should be a draw, the annoying point for black is that neither rook nor bishop can move after the capture, allowing white to improve his king position and then exchange into the pawn ending if he can reach a won position to do so in. Even more annoying, the natural attempt to lift the pin, ...Kc7, runs into Nd5+ and black loses material (at least the g-pawn).

So the option for black that does not raise immediate pawn-ending problems is 1...Bxa2. That's far from simple in its own right but the idea is that if white goes for a7, black will play for K-d6-e7 and Be6 and he is fine.

After 2.Kf2 an idea for black is to try to lift the threat on the g-pawn by playing 2...g5. Now black is threatening to free his bishop with ...Kc7 so if 3.Ke3 Kc7 we get this after the swap-off:

8/p2k4/7p/5pp1/8/4KP2/P5PP/8 w - - 0 5

...which is probably a draw but some lines are still complicated. To be very confident this was OK you would probably need to have this position in mind and be thinking about it for 10 minutes or so when analysing ...Bxd7.

I believe Black's choice of 2...f4 loses to either 3.h4 as played or 3.Ke2 but the Ke2 g5 line with immediate exchange is tricky. For instance, white might have to anticipate this position:

8/p2k4/8/6pp/5p2/3K1P2/P5PP/8 w - - 0 6

Now the subtle Kd4 Kd6, Kc4! Kc6, h4 appears to be the winning idea.

It happens that in the actual game black escaped unscathed because white miscalculated and took a draw in a position where the outcome of a pawn race is a queen ending that white should win. Presumably the clock was a factor on one side or the other in all this.

So maybe no care is needed in exchanging into pure pawn endings because nobody knows how to play them anyway. :lol:

that Caesar guy
18-06-2012, 09:52 PM
Cheng - Morris, as just published on Kerry's blog (assuming moves as given are correct), is a rather advanced and difficult example:

1.d7 Bxd7 2.Kf2 f4 3.h4 a5 4.Ke2 Kc7 5.Nxd7 Rxd7 6.Rxd7+ Kxd7 7.Kd3 Kc6 8.Kc4 Kb6 9.a3 Kc6 10.a4 h5 11.Kd4 1/2-1/2??

Black's ...Bxd7 is at least risky because it gives white the option of exchanging into the pawn ending, and while the outcome if this occurs immediately should be a draw, the annoying point for black is that neither rook nor bishop can move after the capture, allowing white to improve his king position and then exchange into the pawn ending if he can reach a won position to do so in. Even more annoying, the natural attempt to lift the pin, ...Kc7, runs into Nd5+ and black loses material (at least the g-pawn).

So the option for black that does not raise immediate pawn-ending problems is 1...Bxa2. That's far from simple in its own right but the idea is that if white goes for a7, black will play for K-d6-e7 and Be6 and he is fine.

After 2.Kf2 an idea for black is to try to lift the threat on the g-pawn by playing 2...g5. Now black is threatening to free his bishop with ...Kc7 so if 3.Ke3 Kc7 we get this after the swap-off:

8/p2k4/7p/5pp1/8/4KP2/P5PP/8 w - - 0 5

...which is probably a draw but some lines are still complicated. To be very confident this was OK you would probably need to have this position in mind and be thinking about it for 10 minutes or so when analysing ...Bxd7.

I believe Black's choice of 2...f4 loses to either 3.h4 as played or 3.Ke2 but the Ke2 g5 line with immediate exchange is tricky. For instance, white might have to anticipate this position:

8/p2k4/8/6pp/5p2/3K1P2/P5PP/8 w - - 0 6

Now the subtle Kd4 Kd6, Kc4! Kc6, h4 appears to be the winning idea.

It happens that in the actual game black escaped unscathed because white miscalculated and took a draw in a position where the outcome of a pawn race is a queen ending that white should win. Presumably the clock was a factor on one side or the other in all this.

So maybe no care is needed in exchanging into pure pawn endings because nobody knows how to play them anyway. :lol:
The whole ending (and a lot of the actual game) was filled with hallucinations and rather silly miscalculations, a lot of it based in time trouble. I saw Bxa2 and thought 'Draw but considering the amount of stuff I've missed tonight it's just safer to take on d7 and get an easy draw'. Then I realized I was actually pinned...which is just sad on reflection but it was legitimate horror at the time. As Bobby played the instant (and correct) Kf2 I went into panic mode and with not much time played f4, with a great sense of regret...

Not exactly one for the highlights reel that game. Loads of simple things missed. And when the time scramble came it was miscalculation city hahaha

Kevin Bonham
30-06-2012, 06:45 PM
Another example from a game won by Ethan Lim in the Vic U12 today - a rook ending a pawn up where the defender must beware forced liquidation because the pawn ending will be lost. In this case the defender could actually not only have avoided the exchange of rooks, but instead forced pawn exchanges into a drawn position, so Ethan was a bit lucky that didn't happen.

1.Rg3 Kg6 2.f4 Rd5 3.h4 [3.fxg5 is best - see next note for why] 3...Rf5? [3...Rd4 would have not only avoided the rook swap but given black a drawn position eg 4.hxg5 Rxf4 5.gxf6+ Kxf6] 4.fxg5 fxg5 This allows a simplifying exchange into a won pawn ending. 5.Rxg5+ and white wins 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
01-07-2012, 12:35 AM
2... Rd4 or Kf5 would force 3. fxg5, and RPP v RP is almost dead drawn here.

Kevin Bonham
01-07-2012, 05:09 PM
Yes. It's also a good example of how leaving a pin on your king can be a bad idea even when there is nothing too obviously wrong with it.

Jesper Norgaard
02-07-2012, 04:46 AM
In fact not all what could be learned from this endgame has been commented. First you might even criticize 1...Kg6!? because it goes up into a pin, but since 2.f4 does not really improve white's position and pawn exchange helps the defender, then it could be cunning. However, it led to the disaster in the game. Then 2...Rd5?? is the real howler (not commented above) because it loses on the spot - instead of defending it puts the rook on the only square where the moves 3.fxg5 fxg5 4.h4 are actually winning. Of course 2...Kf5 or 2...Rd4 would be easier, but even 2...Rd2 would be OK because of 3.fxg5 fxg5 4.h4 Kh5! (only move) 5.hxg5 (5.Rxg5+,Kxh4 is also a draw) Kg6! and although black will have to suffer because he can't capture the g5-pawn, it should be a draw.

I would certainly have started out with 1...Kf7 to avoid the bind and run the king towards the center, that should (also) be an easy draw.

About 90% of all pawn endings are winning - a statistical fact. All rook endings are drawn, especially those with pawns on only one flank - an exaggeration, but still telling a truth about rook endings being drawish.

Kevin Bonham
02-07-2012, 10:54 AM
Really all of the moves 2...Rd5, 3.h4, 3...Rf5 are "blunders" in that they dramatically change the evaluation of the position with best play, but the first two were not punished while the third one was. As noted it was a junior event; time limit was 40 mins + 30 secs/move.

Kevin Bonham
19-11-2012, 07:58 PM
Also posted to HICC thread.

8/2p2p2/1p1p1kp1/pP1P1b1p/P1P2P1P/3BK1P1/8/8 w - - 0 36

White to move. Should white take the bishop?

Capablanca-Fan
20-11-2012, 04:11 AM
Somewhat moot, because if White retreats, Black plays ...Bc2 and grabs the Pa4, which as you noted in the main game annotations (http://chesschat.org/showpost.php?p=347590&postcount=1445), was a liability and should not have been played there.

But 1.Bxf5 Kxf5 2. Kf3 f6 3. Ke3 [3.Kf2 Ke4 and wins the Q-side Ps after ... f5 to close off counterplay on the other side] 3... Kg4 4.Kf2 Kh3 5. Kf3 [5.f5 gxf5 6.Kf3 Kh2 7.Kf4 (7.Kf2 f4) 7... Kg2 8.Kxf5 Kxg3 9.Kxf6 Kxh4] 5... f5 6. Kf2 Kh2 7.Kf3 Kg1 8.Ke3 Kg2 cleans up.

Jay
20-11-2012, 09:31 AM
I'll take a stab and say that white (I think) must take the bishop.

If W plays Kd2 or Kd4 then then Bxd3, Kx d3 and the Black King gets amongst the pawns by Kf5 and I think it is effectively game over for W.

Be2 allows attack on the a pawn by Bc2 so this is probably no good.

Play could proceed as follows
1 Bxf5, Kxf5; 2Kf3 f6; 3 g4+ hxg4+; 4 Kg3 g5; 5 fxg5 (not hxg5- fxg5 Kxg5 - and I think black wins)....fxg5; 6 h5 (now black must give back a pawn to stop the h pawn)....Kf6; 7 Kxg4 (and I think black is sunk).

Anyway - over to others I've probably missed a get out of jail free card for black somewhere in there

J

Desmond
20-11-2012, 10:10 AM
Somewhat moot, because if White retreats, Black plays ...Bc2 and grabs the Pa4,
The other option though is Be4 when if Black chops the B then the white king is controlling f5. Black has no waiting move and no obvious (well to me anyway) way to triangulate.

Capablanca-Fan
20-11-2012, 11:48 AM
Good point, rr. John Nunn notes that such "co-linear" moves are often overlooked by humans. Maybe put yours in white too?

Garrett
20-11-2012, 11:54 AM
White cannot win this so why risk losing, why even analyse.

Just play Be4.

James Peirce
20-11-2012, 01:24 PM
I recentely suffered a debarcle after exchanging into a King and Pawn endgame against Vincent Horton at the Chesskids State Finals(TAS). Hopefully i can put the position on here and get the "expert" opinions on it.

Kevin Bonham
21-11-2012, 11:56 PM
OK, between you you saw almost everything but no-one saw one crucial move! The answer to the question is it doesn't objectively matter since the position is a draw either way, but if white has analysed everything, he should take the bishop, as black is more likely to stuff it up and lose. Certainly short of time in a practical situation you don't play with the steak knives and you just play Be4.

Well done to Jay on seeing the most important move 4.g4+. Both my opponent and I failed to find this either OTB (desperately short of time) or in a fairly quick post-mortem and hence we both believed playing f4+ then taking the bishop would have lost. (This is why my opponent took my bishop the move earlier, which was in fact a loss, although I erred and gave him a drawn position before he then made a worse mistake allowing me to win) My 1700s-rated guinea pig who I then showed the position to then spent 20 mins looking at everything under the sun but did not find g4+.

Jay's suspicion that he missed black's get out of jail free card is correct - it's ...Ke5! instead of ...Kf6. It looks strange but the king stays in the square of the h-pawn and loses a tempo so it can't be zugzwanged off f6. White gets great king position but black gets the opposition and white can make no progress.

1.f4+ [Played was 1.Bxf5 Kxf5 2.Kd4 f6? (2...g5 wins as after 3.hxg5 Kxg5 black brings up the f-pawn and obtains the outside passed-pawn position) 3.Kd3 Ke5 4.Ke3 Kf5 5.Kd3 g5 6.hxg5?? and black lost(6.Ke3 draws) ] 1...Kf6 2.Bxf5 [2.Be4 (road runner and Garrett) is a draw][ 2.Kd4 Bxd3 3.Kxd3 Kf5 (Jay) indeed is a win for black after 4.Ke3 Kg4 5.Kf2 Kh3 6.f5 gxf5 7.Kf3 f6! 8.Kf4 Kg2 9.Kxf5 Kxg3 10.Kxf6 Kxh4] 2...Kxf5 3.Kf3 f6 4.g4+! (Jay) [4.Kf2 Ke4 and wins (Jono)][4.Ke3 Kg4 5.Kf2 Kh3 6.Kf3 (6.f5 gxf5 7.Kf3 Kh2 8.Kf4 (8.Kf2 f4 wins (Jono)) 8...Kg2 9.Kxf5 Kxg3 10.Kxf6 Kxh4 wins (Jono)) 6...f5 7.Kf2 Kh2 8.Kf3 Kg1 9.Ke2 Kg2 wins (Jono)] 4...hxg4+ 5.Kg3 g5! [5...Ke4 6.Kxg4 and now white gets the outside passer and wins] 6.fxg5! [6.hxg5 fxg5 7.fxg5 Kxg5 balck wins (Jay)] 6...fxg5 7.h5! Ke5! [not 7...Kf6? (Jay) which loses after 8.Kxg4] 8.Kxg4 Kf6 9.h6 Kg6 10.h7 Kxh7 11.Kxg5 Kg7 draw

Capablanca-Fan
22-11-2012, 01:31 AM
Thanks KB; a most instructive position. :clap:

Jay
22-11-2012, 09:50 AM
Thanks KB - good real game position. I did not even consider 1Be4 and you are right after Ke5! - pretty sure I would have missed this move OTB under any sort of time pressure as it doesn't 'make sense' to abandon the pawn. But it looks like it works and forces a drawn position.

MichaelBaron
24-11-2012, 12:06 AM
The position may appear to be simple, but it is not simple at all!

Kevin Bonham
26-01-2013, 11:02 AM
Hou Yifan - Anand, Tata Steel. In a winning knight ending, the World Champion offers a knight swap into an ending a pawn up, as you do, only to find that the pure pawn ending is a draw!

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Qe2 h6 8.Bh4 g6 9.f4 e5 10.fxe5 dxe5 11.0-0-0 Be7 12.Nf3 Qc7 13.Qc4 Qb8 14.Nd5 b5 15.Qc6 Nxd5 16.Rxd5 Qb7 17.Qc3 f6 18.Bf2 Nb6 19.Rd1 Na4 20.Qb3 Qc6 21.Qd5 Qxd5 22.exd5 Bc5 23.Bg3 Nb6 24.Bd3 Bf5 25.Bxf5 gxf5 26.Rhf1 0-0-0 27.Bf2 Bxf2 28.Rxf2 Rxd5 29.g3 Rxd1+ 30.Kxd1 Nd5 31.Nh4 f4 32.Rd2 Ne3+ 33.Ke2 Nc4 34.Rd1 fxg3 35.b3 Rd8 36.Rxd8+ Kxd8 37.hxg3 Nd6 38.Kd3 b4 39.c4 bxc3 40.Kxc3 Kd7 41.Kd3 Ke6 42.b4 Nf5 43.Nxf5 Kxf5 44.a4 Ke6 45.g4 Kd5 46.Kc3 Ke4 47.Kc2 Kd4 48.Kb3 e4 49.b5 axb5 50.axb5 e3 51.Kc2 Ke4 52.Kd1 Kd5 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
05-03-2013, 08:54 PM
Drew-West has been done to death on this board already; fireeater has an article about it here: http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/03/why-you-should-study-elementary-endgames.html

8/4p3/3p4/3P4/4K2k/8/8/8 w - - 0 1

Kf4 draws but Kf5 loses.

James Peirce
06-03-2013, 11:36 AM
The one above is simple because if the black king can be prevented from leaving the h-file it can never help the black pawns as the white king keeps it away.

Kevin Bonham
06-03-2013, 12:37 PM
Yes, simple to draw if that is all you are looking for - I think the problem is that white, short of time, may have thought that Kf5 had winning chances.

Garrett
06-03-2013, 01:33 PM
Kf4 sets a little trap for Black too.

Kevin Bonham
06-03-2013, 01:52 PM
Kf4 sets a little trap for Black too.

Indeed so. For those who haven't seen it:

(i) What is black's correct reply to Kf4?

(ii) What then is white's correct reply to that?

In one line there's another opportunity for white to mess it up and lose a few moves down the track.

As for the thread theme, white had the rather unappealing option of being a pawn down in a rook ending instead of exchanging into this, though I suspect that ending was objectively drawn.

Rincewind
06-03-2013, 05:13 PM
In one line there's another opportunity for white to mess it up and lose a few moves down the track.

I assume you mean after 1.Kf4! Kh3! 2.Kf3! Kh2. It is interesting that from this position white has only two drawing moves 3.Kf2, keeping the direct opposition, or 4.Kf4, taking diagonal opposition, all other moves lose. After the second of these options Black can then force White to make a whole run of forced moves with 3.Kf4 Kg2 4.Kg4! Kf2 5.Kf4! Ke2 6.Ke4! Kd2 7.Kd4! Kc2 8.Kc4! Kb2 9.Kb4! Ka2. Now at this point White's move is again forced with 10.Ka4! If white thinks he can again take the diagonal opposition with 10.Kc4? he needs to think again as 10.Kc4? Ka3! 11.Kc3 Ka4 12. Kc4 Ka5 and white can no longer keep the opposition and is lost. This is a very pretty sequence although it is not forced since of course white must play 10.Ka4! =.

Edit: and a similar line occurs after 3.Kf2 Kh1 4.Kf3 Kg1 5.Kg3! etc.

Kevin Bonham
06-03-2013, 05:35 PM
More to it than I thought - I had the above but only as far as move 4 being forced.

Adamski
06-03-2013, 05:37 PM
For some reason I can't read white text on my mobile. These words of wisdom will have to wait until I am on my PC.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2013, 03:01 AM
Another one from top level. White was very short of time when he played the fatal 30.Bxd4?? (had about 3 mins for 11 moves and spent 2 of them deciding to blunder) but no excuse as the move was unnecessary as well as losing.

Grischuk - Kramnik


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 Bd7 10. h3 h6 11. Rd1 Kc8 12. a4 a5 13. b3 b6 14. Bb2 Ne7 15. Rd2 c5 16. Ne2 Ng6 17. Rad1 Be6 18. c4 Be7 19. Nc3 Kb7 20. Nd5 Rad8 21. Nxe7 Rxd2 22. Nxd2 Nxe7 23. Nf1 Kc8 24. f3 g5 25. Ng3 Rd8 26. Rxd8+ Kxd8 27. Kf2 Bf5 28. Nxf5 Nxf5 29. g4 Nd4 30. Bxd4?? cxd4 31. Ke2 Kd7 32. Kd3 c5 33. Ke4 Ke6 34. f4 gxf4 35. Kxf4 d3 36. Ke3 Kxe5 37. Kxd3 Kf4 38. Ke2 Kg3 39. Ke3 Kxh3 40. Kf4 Kh4
41. Kf5 Kg3 0-1

James Watson
08-04-2013, 05:59 PM
This was the position form one of my first long time control chess games, at the time my rating was in the 900s and my opponents was in the 1600s. I had played badly ealier and ended up being down a piece but after my opponent avoided some simple traps he ended up sacing the piece back to liquidate into an apparently winning pawn ending.

8/7p/4p1p1/1P1k1pP1/5P2/P3K2P/8/8 b - - 0 1

I had been about to play the drawing move 43...e5! but then decided I was just going to be wasting my opponents time instead, I mean he was confidant and he had already sacked a piece to get into this clearly winning position right? so I chose to just resign and go home instead. Then when I rode my bike home was getting into bed the image of the board appeared into my mind and I suddenly realised the truth, instantly I got the board and pieces out and conformed the reality, I had just resigned a clearly drawn position!

jammo
08-04-2013, 07:22 PM
This was the position form one of my first long time control chess games, at the time my rating was in the 900s and my opponents was in the 1600s. I had played badly ealier and ended up being down a piece but after my opponent avoided some simple traps he ended up sacing the piece back to liquidate into an apparently winning pawn ending.

8/7p/4p1p1/1P1k1pP1/5P2/P3K2P/8/8 b - - 0 1

I had been about to play the drawing move 43...e5! but then decided I was just going to be wasting my opponents time instead, I mean he was confidant and he had already sacked a piece to get into this clearly winning position right? so I chose to just resign and go home instead. Then when I rode my bike home was getting into bed the image of the board appeared into my mind and I suddenly realised the truth, instantly I got the board and pieces out and conformed the reality, I had just resigned a clearly drawn position!

Sorry to disappoint you but White wins fairly easily.

James Watson
08-04-2013, 07:35 PM
Sorry to disappoint you but White wins fairly easily.
Black can forcibly get a protected passed pawn though and at the same time still have the tempi to prevent white from promoting the outside passed pawns by themselves. So if white tries to promote we end up in a situation where black is babysitting the a/b pawns and white is babysitting the f pawn. If white is winning here that means I must have missed some tactic that involves white mating with the pawns or white can somehow allow black to promote. I'm guessing there must be some sort of pawn mate motif if white wins easily, is that it?


Just looking at it now you're right, I think white does win by simply escorting the pawns

Rincewind
08-04-2013, 07:50 PM
Black can forcibly get a protected passed pawn though and at the same time still have the tempi to prevent white from promoting the outside passed pawns by themselves. So if white tries to promote we end up in a situation where black is babysitting the a/b pawns and white is babysitting the f pawn. If white is winning here that means I must have missed some tactic that involves white mating with the pawns or white can somehow allow black to promote. I'm guessing there must be some sort of pawn mate motif if white wins easily, is that it?

White has a lot more freedom than your analysis would suggest since he can "babysit" the f-pawn from as far away as b5. This allows white to get the Q-side pawns through pretty easily. If black tries to break with f4 then white can calmly return to pick up the f-pawn and then return to promote the a- or b-pawn, all the while his a- and b-pawns are untouchable.

Carl Gorka
11-08-2013, 09:07 PM
My latest blog post (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/the-importance-of-elementary-endgames.html) is about this subject.

James Watson
12-08-2013, 12:48 AM
Nice instructive endgame there. I really love all the nuances that are involved in pawn endings, even simple ones

Jesper Norgaard
19-11-2013, 03:11 PM
7Q/5k2/p2p2p1/2p5/1q3P2/6P1/1P6/6K1 b - - 2 41

Interesting position that could have occurred in one of my games - eventually it was a draw. White just played 41.Qc3-h8 in an attempt to get checks from behind with Qh7+ and Qh8+. The question is if Black can play 41...Qd4+ 42.Qxd4 cxd4. Is this winning for Black? My first impression was that it was not very promising. It turned out to be quite difficult to evaluate for a human. Answers in white please.

Rincewind
19-11-2013, 03:35 PM
I don't have an analysis but my impression is that this looks winning for Black. Looking at the pawn position doesn't black a-pawn block whites b-pawn and the king side is held by blacks king and g-pawn so White's king has to do something about the d-pawn and while that is happening Black can win a k-side pawn and break through with the g-pawn. Something like 1...Qd4+ 2.Qxd4 cxd4 3.Kf2 Ke6. Now if 4.Ke2 black can play 4... Kf5 and use d3-d2 to divert the king and allow a breakthrough into win the k-side pawns. If 4.Kf3 d3 5.Ke3 Kf5 with the same idea. White wants to swap off all the pawns but can't force this because needs to be in a position to win both d-pawns when this occurs. Could be totally wrong as it is just a brief impression.

Kevin Bonham
19-11-2013, 04:15 PM
My first impression (without comp) is that ...Qd4+ at best throws away black's winning chances. It would win if black could get the king to g4, but that isn't possible by force. So 41...Qd4+ 42.Qxd4 cxd4 43.Kf2 Ke6 44.Ke2 now:

44...Kf5 45.Kf3 threatening g4+
44...Kd5 45.Kd3

in neither case do I see a way for black to make progress so long as white maintains these two oppositions as required. If 45.Kf3 d3 as decoy, g4+ and gets the d-pawn.

In a practical game if black was at all short of time I would play ...Qd1+ fishing for the cheapie Kg2 Qd2+ Khx Qh5+ winning!

Kevin Bonham
19-11-2013, 04:30 PM
But now I see why it's trickier than at first looks. Black may be able to offer the d-pawn as bait before the king gets to f3, and thus reach g4. Even if I couldn't see a concrete win for black and thought it was probably drawn, I would still not have risked allowing the queen swap with black without being sure it was safe.

Jesper Norgaard
19-11-2013, 04:41 PM
I don't have an analysis but my impression is that this looks winning for Black. Looking at the pawn position doesn't black a-pawn block whites b-pawn and the king side is held by blacks king and g-pawn so White's king has to do something about the d-pawn and while that is happening Black can win a k-side pawn and break through with the g-pawn. Something like 1...Qd4+ 2.Qxd4 cxd4 3.Kf2 Ke6. Now if 4.Ke2 black can play 4... Kf5 and use d3-d2 to divert the king and allow a breakthrough into win the k-side pawns. If 4.Kf3 d3 5.Ke3 Kf5 with the same idea. White wants to swap off all the pawns but can't force this because needs to be in a position to win both d-pawns when this occurs. Could be totally wrong as it is just a brief impression.

Comment below:
I agree with you until 1...Qd4+ 2.Qxd4 cxd4 3.Kf2 Ke6 4.Ke2. If black plays 4... Kf5 what would be the answer on 5.Kf3? If 5... d3 6.g4+ Ke6 7.Ke3. I must admit I am also not sure I have all answers in the position, because the zugzwang elements are so diverse. Black can insert a5-a4, or switch back between d5 and f5 etc.

Rincewind
19-11-2013, 05:03 PM
I'll need to look when I have access to a chess set. :)

Rincewind
19-11-2013, 08:58 PM
I've had a bit more of a look at this and while Black seems close to winning White seems to have just enough to hold on. Rather than following the line I gave earlier Black should I think wait at e6 and play 4... a5 but then if White plays 5.b3 he holds whereas I think 5.g4 (for example) loses. I would not be surprised if there is an unexpected resource to tip the balance as it seems finely poised.

Kevin Bonham
19-11-2013, 09:06 PM
Following Barry's line above:

After a5, b3 d3+, Kxd3 Kf5, doesn't white have problems?

Rincewind
20-11-2013, 12:18 AM
I don't think so. In that case White's king comes to e4 (I don't think it matters if via d4 or e3) and if Black takes g3 then White plays f5. If Black instead tries d5+ then Kxd5 Kxg3 Kd5 and all is well.

Edit: Scratch this. I loaded this with an engine and actually White *is* busted after d5+ Kd5 Kxg3 line. White follows up with Kf3 and after say f5 gxf5 Kxf5 Ke3 wins easily.

Jesper Norgaard
20-11-2013, 07:07 AM
Following Barry's line above:

After a5, b3 d3+, Kxd3 Kf5, doesn't white have problems?

Let's follow that up - since the finer point of this particular position deserves a look. After 4...a5 5.b3 d3+ 6.Kxd3 Kf5 7.Ke3 (threatening Kf3 and g4+)
7...Kg4 8.Ke4 now 8...Kxg3 doesn't win because after 9.f5! d5+ 10.Ke5! gxf5 11.Kxf5 Black is in time to run over and capture the d-pawn and a-pawn. Then 8...d5+! is correct but after 9.Ke5! White needs to find a study-like move 9...Kf3!! and zugzwang. 10.Kxd5 Kxg3 11.Ke4 Kf2! doesn't work, and likewise 10.f5 gxf5 11.Kxf5 d4! wins (not 11...Kxg3? 12.Ke5 which transposes to the earlier mentioned drawing lines). Also it is worth mentioning that after 9.Ke5! d4? doesn't win because of 10.Kxd4! Kxg3 11.Ke3! winning the opposition. I think this already shows why I would be very hesitant to enter such a pawn endgame in a normal OTB game even with half an hour on the clock, because there are so many fine points where a slight concrete error can be fatal, when only looking at the position with a holistic view. However, it does seem to be winning in all lines.

That leaves another important branch that you mentioned. If 4...a5 5.g4 how does Black win this?

Rincewind
20-11-2013, 10:04 AM
That leaves another important branch that you mentioned. If 4...a5 5.g4 how does Black win this?

I looked at this yesterday and from memory I thought it was quite easy with Kd5 Kd3 then a4 with White in zugzwang. which is why I considered after a5 White should play b3 and not g4.

Jesper Norgaard
21-11-2013, 12:12 PM
I looked at this yesterday and from memory I thought it was quite easy with Kd5 Kd3 then a4 with White in zugzwang. which is why I considered after a5 White should play b3 and not g4.


True, it is not that difficult. After 4...a5 5.g4 Kd5 6.Kd3 a4 7.f5 gxf5 8.gxf5 Ke5 9.f6 Kxf6 10.Kxd4 Ke6 11.Kc4 (if White stays with the d-pawn, black will eventually give up the d-pawn for the b-pawn) 11...Ke5 (a move you have to be careful with since it just advanced to the place where b8=Q+ will be with check, but here it is right) 12.Kb4 d5 13.Kxa4 Ke4! (The point and the only move that wins - Black is ready to meet Kb3 with Kd3 and b4 with d4 and support the pawn for instance 14.b4 d4 15.b5 d3 16.Kb3 Ke3! and the d-pawn will always promote with check. If 16.b6 d2 17.b7 d1=Q+ 18.Kb5 Qd6 Black is busted) 14.Kb3 Kd3 15.Kb4 d4 16.Kc5 Ke3 17.b4 d3 18.b5 d2 19.b6 d1=Q 20.b7 Qd8 -+

Another branch we can quickly reject is 4...d3+ 5.Kxd3 Kf5 6.b4! and because of the pawn constellation with black a6 against white b4, this is now a draw. For instance 6...Kg4 7.Ke4 d5+ 8.Kxd5! Kxg3 9.Ke5 Kf3 10.f5=

Igor_Goldenberg
21-11-2013, 06:33 PM
Black wins, but it's awfully complicated. Below is the analysis checked with the engine:

1... Qd4+ 2. Qxd4 cxd4 3. Kf2 a5! (the only winning move)
a) 4. Ke2 Ke6 5. Kd3 Kf5 6. Kxd4 Kg4 7. Ke4 a4!
b) 4. b3 Ke6 5. Ke2 (5. g4 Kd5 6. Kf3 d3 7. Ke3 d2 8. Kxd2 Ke4-+) d3+ 6. Kxd3 Kf5 7. Kd4 Kg4 8. Ke4 d5+ 9. Ke5 Kf3!! 10. Kxd5 Kxg3 11. Ke4 Kf2
c) 4. g4 Ke6 5. Ke2 Kd5 6. Kd3 a4 7. f5 gxf5 8. gxf5 Ke5 9. f6 Kxf6 10. Kxd4 Ke6 11. Kc4 d5+ 12. Kb4 Ke5 13. Kxa4 Ke4!! (as Jesper suggested)

Before swapping into pawn ending black has to find 7...a4, 9...Kf3!! (9 moves ahead) and 13...Ke4! (13 moves ahead) in each line. I would definitely not find it OTB (despite being relatively good with pawn endings) so far in advance. Even analysing at home I had to check every line with computer to make sure it works.

Practical solution is to play very promising queen endgame

Jesper Norgaard
22-11-2013, 12:29 AM
Black wins, but it's awfully complicated. Below is the analysis checked with the engine:

1... Qd4+ 2. Qxd4 cxd4 3. Kf2 a5! (the only winning move)
a) 4. Ke2 Ke6 5. Kd3 Kf5 6. Kxd4 Kg4 7. Ke4 a4!
b) 4. b3 Ke6 5. Ke2 (5. g4 Kd5 6. Kf3 d3 7. Ke3 d2 8. Kxd2 Ke4-+) d3+ 6. Kxd3 Kf5 7. Kd4 Kg4 8. Ke4 d5+ 9. Ke5 Kf3!! 10. Kxd5 Kxg3 11. Ke4 Kf2
c) 4. g4 Ke6 5. Ke2 Kd5 6. Kd3 a4 7. f5 gxf5 8. gxf5 Ke5 9. f6 Kxf6 10. Kxd4 Ke6 11. Kc4 d5+ 12. Kb4 Ke5 13. Kxa4 Ke4!! (as Jesper suggested)

Before swapping into pawn ending black has to find 7...a4, 9...Kf3!! (9 moves ahead) and 13...Ke4! (13 moves ahead) in each line. I would definitely not find it OTB (despite being relatively good with pawn endings) so far in advance. Even analysing at home I had to check every line with computer to make sure it works.

Practical solution is to play very promising queen endgame


I am not quite sure I agree that the queen endgame is so promising. In the actual game I goofed up the sequence of moves going into a queen ending, that was even more drawish. In the analyzed position it is still not easy to coordinate the attempt to avoid perpetual check if looking for another move than 1...Qd4+

Otherwise to get a full understanding of the pawn endgame, you probably could do it fairly comfortable if there were one hour on the clock, but if only half an hour, it would be really tough.

Actually I did not catch Rincewind's strong move 4...a5 but I don't think it is the only one that wins.

1... Qd4+ 2. Qxd4 cxd4 3. Kf2 Ke6 4.Ke2 Kd5!? was my first idea, and it works quite similarly (and with a lot of transpositions) to the already analyzed lines after 5.Kd3 a5 6.b3 Ke6 7.g4 Kd5 (curiously Black has just stepped twice to e6 and twice to d5 with the king, but is still winning): 8.f5 gxf5 9.gxf5 Ke5 10.f6 Kxf6 11.Kxd4 Ke6 12.Kc4 Ke5 13.Kb5 d5 14.Kxa5 d4 15.b4 d3 16.b5 d2 17.b6 d1=Q 18.b7 Qd6 and Black is still winning.

I think it is a very rewarding pawn endgame to analyze because of the many transpositional lines that can happen. The whole idea with 9...Kf3!! for instance only works because the pawns are fixed on a5 vs. b3 where with a6 vs. b2 to react the same way would only be a draw because there is no way to combine the defense of a6 with attack on b2, the final moves in the former line (a5 vs. b3) being 1...Kc3 2. Kc5 Kxb3 3. Kb5 a4 etc.

Kevin Bonham
22-11-2013, 10:00 AM
Great example position.

It seems then that ...a5 wins on any of three moves:

1...Qd4+ 2.Qxd4 cxd4 3.Kf2 and now:

(i) 3...a5 wins
(ii) 3...Ke6 4.Ke2 a5 wins
(iii) 3...Ke6 4.Ke2 Kd5 5.Kd3 a5 wins

Igor_Goldenberg
23-11-2013, 10:54 PM
Position is dead equal 32. f4 e6 now white has a tiny edge, but still close to a draw 33. dxe6+ Qxe6 34. Qd3 Ke7 35. Kf3 h5? very easy to miss that white can exchange into a winning pawn endgame 36. Qe4!+- Kf6 37. Qxe6+ Kxe6
38. Ke4 Kf6 39. Kd5 g5 the only chance to complicate 40. Kxd6 (40. fxg5+ would be an inferior alternative 40...Kxg5 41. Kxd6 Kg4 42. e4
Kxg3 43. e5 h4 44. e6 and queen endgame can be difficult to win)40... gxf4?
(40... g4 would at least lead to queen endgame 41. e4 h4 42. gxh4 g3 43.
e5+ Kf5 44. e6 g2 45. e7 g1=Q 46. e8=Q , but white still should win). The text should've lost quickly, but... 41. exf4 Kf5 42. Kc6 Kg4 43. Kxb6? (we both missed
43. f5! Kxf5 44. Kxb6 Kg4 45. a4 Kxg3 46. a5+-) 43... Kxg3 44. f5 h4 45. f6 h3
46. f7 h2 47. f8=Q h1=Q 48. Qd6+ with easy win in queen endgame that took another 30 moves and mutual blunder 1-0

Jesper Norgaard
24-11-2013, 01:14 PM
Position is dead equal 32. f4 e6 now white has a tiny edge, but still close to a draw 33. dxe6+ Qxe6 34. Qd3 Ke7 35. Kf3 h5? very easy to miss that white can exchange into a winning pawn endgame 36. Qe4!+- Kf6 37. Qxe6+ Kxe6
38. Ke4 Kf6 39. Kd5 g5 the only chance to complicate 40. Kxd6 (40. fxg5+ would be an inferior alternative 40...Kxg5 41. Kxd6 Kg4 42. e4
Kxg3 43. e5 h4 44. e6 and queen endgame can be difficult to win)40... gxf4?
(40... g4 would at least lead to queen endgame 41. e4 h4 42. gxh4 g3 43.
e5+ Kf5 44. e6 g2 45. e7 g1=Q 46. e8=Q , but white still should win). The text should've lost quickly, but... 41. exf4 Kf5 42. Kc6 Kg4 43. Kxb6? (we both missed
43. f5! Kxf5 44. Kxb6 Kg4 45. a4 Kxg3 46. a5+-) 43... Kxg3 44. f5 h4 45. f6 h3
46. f7 h2 47. f8=Q h1=Q 48. Qd6+ with easy win in queen endgame that took another 30 moves and mutual blunder 1-0

Nice example endgame.

It is noteworthy how the element of queening rook pawn against opposite side rook pawn can not only win a tempo, but prevent promotion alltogether, with an easy win.
Hence 43.f5!+- would have been decisive.

An option to exchange queens from a queen ending (or generally the last piece in any endgame) must be considered as a deadly threat, just as much as winning a piece or a pawn, because 90% of pawn endgames win, a percentage way higher than for any other endgame. So after 35.Kf3 Black should consider 36.Qe4 a deadly threat.

(1) The only easily winning queen endgame is one where there are decisive threats to exchange queens, or one side gets an extra queen.

Which sometimes leads to a new queen endgame after mutual promoting, leading recursively back to (1).

"With easy win in queen endgame that took another 30 moves and mutual blunder" - QED :)

Igor_Goldenberg
24-11-2013, 02:06 PM
If black didn't play 32...e6 swapping queens wouldn't be a threat.
As for "easy win in queen endgame" - the fear of queen endgame is overrated. The one in the game was indeed an easy win. There are many checks and you have to calculate variations, but checks will come to an end sooner or later. It took almost 30 moves, but the result was never in doubt (even after I blundered a pawn and black reciprocated by resigning).
I'd say one of the reason I missed 43.f5 is that I had no doubt queen ending is won and didn't think hard - which is inexcusable.

Kevin Bonham
02-12-2013, 07:00 PM
There needs to also be a thread called "Take care when not exchanging into pure pawn endings!"

6k1/pr3ppp/4p3/8/8/R5P1/P3PP1P/6K1 w - - 0 1

In this position in a rapid tonight white (Markovitz) played 1.Rb3. Rather than spend a while calculating the pure pawn ending (which if anything is good for black and certainly not lost) I instead more or less instinctively played the fabulous 1...Rc7 :wall:

ER
02-12-2013, 07:05 PM
tragic. been there done that. I feel for you!

FM_Bill
02-07-2015, 10:07 PM
This was the position form one of my first long time control chess games, at the time my rating was in the 900s and my opponents was in the 1600s. I had played badly ealier and ended up being down a piece but after my opponent avoided some simple traps he ended up sacing the piece back to liquidate into an apparently winning pawn ending.

8/7p/4p1p1/1P1k1pP1/5P2/P3K2P/8/8 b - - 0 1

I had been about to play the drawing move 43...e5! but then decided I was just going to be wasting my opponents time instead, I mean he was confidant and he had already sacked a piece to get into this clearly winning position right? so I chose to just resign and go home instead. Then when I rode my bike home was getting into bed the image of the board appeared into my mind and I suddenly realised the truth, instantly I got the board and pieces out and conformed the reality, I had just resigned a clearly drawn position!

...e5, fxe5 Kxe5, a4 Kd5,a5 Kc5,a6 Kb6, Kf3 Ka7,Kf4 Kb6,Ke5 Ka7,Kd6 Kb6, a7 Kb7,b6 f4,a8 Kxa8,Kc7 f3, White mates in 3.

Carl Gorka
02-07-2015, 11:38 PM
Hi Bill, nice analysis. I thought of 6.Kd4 (instead of 6.Kf3) 6..Ka7 7.Kc5 (still in the square of the f-pawn) 7..Kb8 8.b6 Ka8 9.Kc6 f4 [9..Kb8 10.a7] 10.Kc7 f3 etc

Kevin Bonham
03-08-2015, 11:33 PM
We had two in one night at HICC tonight. Firstly this one which I've posted on the HICC thread:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?3172-Hobart-International-Chess-Club-news-results-misc&p=399266&viewfull=1#post399266

We also saw this in the second divison:

8/p5p1/2p5/8/P1P1q2P/1Q4P1/3k2K1/8 w - - 0 1

1.Qf3 Qxf3+ [1...Qxc4 is a draw at worst but black thinks he sees a win because he can get the pawn back and have a passed pawn. However, white's pawns are just faster] 2.Kxf3 Kd3 3.h5 Kxc4 4.g4 Kd3 5.g5 c5 6.h6 and white just queened first and won.

Kevin Bonham
13-12-2016, 08:19 PM
Another victim - Australasian Masters, S. Kasparov - Ikeda

3b4/7p/1p2k1p1/1p2p1BP/1P2P1K1/2P3P1/8/8 b - - 0 50

Black plays 50...Bf6?? when the immediate exchange for bishops in response (51.Bxf6) would be drawn but after 51.hxg6! hxg6 52.Bxf6 Kxf6 53.Kh4 it's a win for white.

Ian CCC
14-12-2016, 09:22 PM
Black plays 50...Bf6?? when the immediate exchange for bishops would be drawn but after 51.hxg6! hxg6 52.Bxf6 Kxf6 53.Kh4 it's a win for white.

The immediate exchange of bishops loses just as badly. Keeping the bishops on the board with 50...Bc7 is the only way to draw.

Kevin Bonham
14-12-2016, 09:43 PM
The immediate exchange of bishops loses just as badly.

Sorry, unclear writing on my part. I meant that the immediate exchange of bishops by white in response to 50...Bf6?? would be a draw.

Adamski
16-12-2016, 07:34 AM
tragic. been there done that. I feel for you!

I also have more than once fallen for an obvious mate in one or two moves.

MichaelBaron
17-12-2016, 10:57 AM
While Kh4 is tricky and was missed by black, even if thought exchanging bishops was drawing, Bc7 is safer so should have been played in any case.

Igor_Goldenberg
19-12-2016, 09:39 AM
There are few examples, Sveshnikov-Kasparov being the most famous, where exchange of "bad bishop" led to lost pawn endgame.
I had few lessons with one of my students where we went through the issue of changing pieces in the endgame. One of the most difficult and error-prone area!

James Peirce
09-05-2017, 12:36 PM
Move 49 is the mistake by Black, we both missed the winning sequence for white although it is very difficult to spot in a 5+0 blitz game!

[Event "Casual game"]
[Site "https://lichess.org/OIpO29HC"]
[Date "2017.05.09"]
[Round "-"]
[White "JamesPeirce"]
[Black "hng"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "1912"]
[BlackElo "1970"]
[PlyCount "101"]
[Variant "Standard"]
[TimeControl "300+0"]
[ECO "C18"]
[Opening "French Defense: Winawer Variation, Retreat Variation"]
[Termination "Normal"]
[Annotator "lichess.org"]

1. e4 { [%clk 0:05:00] } e6 { [%clk 0:05:00] } 2. d4 { [%clk 0:04:58] } d5 { [%clk 0:04:59] } 3. Nc3 { [%clk 0:04:57] } Bb4 { [%clk 0:04:54] } 4. e5 { [%clk 0:04:55] } c5 { [%clk 0:04:52] } 5. a3 { [%clk 0:04:54] } Ba5 { [%clk 0:04:49] } { C18 French Defense: Winawer Variation, Retreat Variation } 6. Nf3 { [%clk 0:04:45] } Nc6 { [%clk 0:04:47] } 7. dxc5 { [%clk 0:04:42] } Bxc3+ { [%clk 0:04:46] } 8. bxc3 { [%clk 0:04:41] } Qe7 { [%clk 0:04:44] } 9. Be3 { [%clk 0:04:40] } Nh6 { [%clk 0:04:40] } 10. Bxh6 { [%clk 0:04:33] } gxh6 { [%clk 0:04:38] } 11. Bb5 { [%clk 0:04:25] } Bd7 { [%clk 0:04:35] } 12. O-O { [%clk 0:04:22] } Qxc5 { [%clk 0:04:33] } 13. Bxc6 { [%clk 0:04:20] } Bxc6 { [%clk 0:04:31] } 14. Qd4 { [%clk 0:04:19] } Qxd4 { [%clk 0:04:25] } 15. cxd4 { [%clk 0:04:17] } Rc8 { [%clk 0:04:23] } 16. c3 { [%clk 0:04:15] } Bb5 { [%clk 0:04:20] } 17. Rfc1 { [%clk 0:04:14] } Rc4 { [%clk 0:04:17] } 18. Ra2 { [%clk 0:04:09] } Kd7 { [%clk 0:04:15] } 19. h3 { [%clk 0:04:05] } Rhc8 { [%clk 0:04:12] } 20. Rb2 { [%clk 0:04:03] } Ba6 { [%clk 0:04:07] } 21. Rb3 { [%clk 0:03:58] } b6 { [%clk 0:04:03] } 22. Nh2 { [%clk 0:03:56] } Rxd4 { [%clk 0:03:59] } 23. Ng4 { [%clk 0:03:51] } Rdc4 { [%clk 0:03:41] } 24. Nxh6 { [%clk 0:03:48] } Ke7 { [%clk 0:03:38] } 25. Ng4 { [%clk 0:03:45] } h5 { [%clk 0:03:35] } 26. Nf6 { [%clk 0:03:38] } Bb7 { [%clk 0:03:32] } 27. Nxh5 { [%clk 0:03:33] } Bc6 { [%clk 0:03:30] } 28. Rb4 { [%clk 0:03:25] } Rc5 { [%clk 0:03:22] } 29. f4 { [%clk 0:03:18] } Be8 { [%clk 0:03:20] } 30. Nf6 { [%clk 0:02:57] } Rxc3 { [%clk 0:03:17] } 31. Rxc3 { [%clk 0:02:56] } Rxc3 { [%clk 0:03:16] } 32. Nxe8 { [%clk 0:02:55] } Kxe8 { [%clk 0:03:14] } 33. a4 { [%clk 0:02:51] } Rc4 { [%clk 0:03:08] } 34. Rxc4 { [%clk 0:02:49] } dxc4 { [%clk 0:03:06] } 35. Kf2 { [%clk 0:02:48] } a6 { [%clk 0:03:04] } 36. g4 { [%clk 0:02:45] } b5 { [%clk 0:03:03] } 37. axb5 { [%clk 0:02:44] } axb5 { [%clk 0:03:02] } 38. Ke2 { [%clk 0:02:43] } b4 { [%clk 0:03:00] } 39. Kd2 { [%clk 0:02:42] } c3+ { [%clk 0:02:59] } 40. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:41] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:58] } 41. h4 { [%clk 0:02:40] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:57] } 42. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:35] } Kg6 { [%clk 0:02:55] } 43. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:32] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:50] } 44. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:30] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:48] } 45. g5 { [%clk 0:02:25] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:47] } 46. h5 { [%clk 0:02:24] } Kh7 { [%clk 0:02:45] } 47. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:22] } Kg8 { [%clk 0:02:43] } 48. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:21] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:42] } 49. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:20] } Ke7 { [%clk 0:02:41] } 50. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:18] } Ke8 { [%clk 0:02:38] } 51. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:15] } { The game is a draw. } 1/2-1/2

Capablanca-Fan
09-05-2017, 01:27 PM
Move 49 is the mistake by Black, we both missed the winning sequence for white although it is very difficult to spot in a 5+0 blitz game!

[Event "Casual game"]
[Site "https://lichess.org/OIpO29HC"]
[Date "2017.05.09"]
[Round "-"]
[White "JamesPeirce"]
[Black "hng"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "1912"]
[BlackElo "1970"]
[PlyCount "101"]
[Variant "Standard"]
[TimeControl "300+0"]
[ECO "C18"]
[Opening "French Defense: Winawer Variation, Retreat Variation"]
[Termination "Normal"]
[Annotator "lichess.org"]

1. e4 { [%clk 0:05:00] } e6 { [%clk 0:05:00] } 2. d4 { [%clk 0:04:58] } d5 { [%clk 0:04:59] } 3. Nc3 { [%clk 0:04:57] } Bb4 { [%clk 0:04:54] } 4. e5 { [%clk 0:04:55] } c5 { [%clk 0:04:52] } 5. a3 { [%clk 0:04:54] } Ba5 { [%clk 0:04:49] } { C18 French Defense: Winawer Variation, Retreat Variation } 6. Nf3 { [%clk 0:04:45] } Nc6 { [%clk 0:04:47] } 7. dxc5 { [%clk 0:04:42] } Bxc3+ { [%clk 0:04:46] } 8. bxc3 { [%clk 0:04:41] } Qe7 { [%clk 0:04:44] } 9. Be3 { [%clk 0:04:40] } Nh6 { [%clk 0:04:40] } 10. Bxh6 { [%clk 0:04:33] } gxh6 { [%clk 0:04:38] } 11. Bb5 { [%clk 0:04:25] } Bd7 { [%clk 0:04:35] } 12. O-O { [%clk 0:04:22] } Qxc5 { [%clk 0:04:33] } 13. Bxc6 { [%clk 0:04:20] } Bxc6 { [%clk 0:04:31] } 14. Qd4 { [%clk 0:04:19] } Qxd4 { [%clk 0:04:25] } 15. cxd4 { [%clk 0:04:17] } Rc8 { [%clk 0:04:23] } 16. c3 { [%clk 0:04:15] } Bb5 { [%clk 0:04:20] } 17. Rfc1 { [%clk 0:04:14] } Rc4 { [%clk 0:04:17] } 18. Ra2 { [%clk 0:04:09] } Kd7 { [%clk 0:04:15] } 19. h3 { [%clk 0:04:05] } Rhc8 { [%clk 0:04:12] } 20. Rb2 { [%clk 0:04:03] } Ba6 { [%clk 0:04:07] } 21. Rb3 { [%clk 0:03:58] } b6 { [%clk 0:04:03] } 22. Nh2 { [%clk 0:03:56] } Rxd4 { [%clk 0:03:59] } 23. Ng4 { [%clk 0:03:51] } Rdc4 { [%clk 0:03:41] } 24. Nxh6 { [%clk 0:03:48] } Ke7 { [%clk 0:03:38] } 25. Ng4 { [%clk 0:03:45] } h5 { [%clk 0:03:35] } 26. Nf6 { [%clk 0:03:38] } Bb7 { [%clk 0:03:32] } 27. Nxh5 { [%clk 0:03:33] } Bc6 { [%clk 0:03:30] } 28. Rb4 { [%clk 0:03:25] } Rc5 { [%clk 0:03:22] } 29. f4 { [%clk 0:03:18] } Be8 { [%clk 0:03:20] } 30. Nf6 { [%clk 0:02:57] } Rxc3 { [%clk 0:03:17] } 31. Rxc3 { [%clk 0:02:56] } Rxc3 { [%clk 0:03:16] } 32. Nxe8 { [%clk 0:02:55] } Kxe8 { [%clk 0:03:14] } 33. a4 { [%clk 0:02:51] } Rc4 { [%clk 0:03:08] } 34. Rxc4 { [%clk 0:02:49] } dxc4 { [%clk 0:03:06] } 35. Kf2 { [%clk 0:02:48] } a6 { [%clk 0:03:04] } 36. g4 { [%clk 0:02:45] } b5 { [%clk 0:03:03] } 37. axb5 { [%clk 0:02:44] } axb5 { [%clk 0:03:02] } 38. Ke2 { [%clk 0:02:43] } b4 { [%clk 0:03:00] } 39. Kd2 { [%clk 0:02:42] } c3+ { [%clk 0:02:59] } 40. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:41] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:58] } 41. h4 { [%clk 0:02:40] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:57] } 42. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:35] } Kg6 { [%clk 0:02:55] } 43. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:32] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:50] } 44. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:30] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:48] } 45. g5 { [%clk 0:02:25] } Kg7 { [%clk 0:02:47] } 46. h5 { [%clk 0:02:24] } Kh7 { [%clk 0:02:45] } 47. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:22] } Kg8 { [%clk 0:02:43] } 48. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:21] } Kf8 { [%clk 0:02:42] } 49. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:20] } Ke7 { [%clk 0:02:41] } 50. Kb3 { [%clk 0:02:18] } Ke8 { [%clk 0:02:38] } 51. Kc2 { [%clk 0:02:15] } { The game is a draw. } 1/2-1/2

The right move in the opening is 6.b4. In the endgame, why not try 51. f5, e.g. 51... exf5 52.g6 fxg6 53. h6. White should be able to make passed pawns on the h and e files, and the king can't deal with both because they have a common square.

Kevin Bonham
09-05-2017, 08:12 PM
The right move in the opening is 6.b4. In the endgame, why not try 51. f5, e.g. 51... exf5 52.g6 fxg6 53. h6. White should be able to make passed pawns on the h and e files, and the king can't deal with both because they have a common square.

Yes either 51.h6 or 51.f5 win with the same ideas as 50.h6. Instead 50...Kf8 would have held with best play. Quite an interesting example.

Igor_Goldenberg
16-06-2017, 03:22 PM
With king on f8 only f5 wins, h6 leads to a draw.
For example:
49. h6 Kg8 50.f5 Kh7! 51.g6+ Kxh6! (51...fxg6? 52 .fxe6! +-) 52.gxf7 Kg7=
49.f5! exf5 50.g6 f4 51.h6 fxg6 (51...f3 52.h7! Kg7 53.gxf7 +-) 52.h7! Kg7 53.e6 f3 54.e7 f2 55.e8Q (or 55.h8Q+ Kxh8 56.e8Q+) f1Q 56.h8Q#

Jesper Norgaard
16-06-2017, 11:41 PM
With king on f8 only f5 wins, h6 leads to a draw.
For example:
49. h6 Kg8 50.f5 Kh7! 51.g6+ Kxh6! (51...fxg6? 52 .fxe6! +-) 52.gxf7 Kg7=
49.f5! exf5 50.g6 f4 51.h6 fxg6 (51...f3 52.h7! Kg7 53.gxf7 +-) 52.h7! Kg7 53.e6 f3 54.e7 f2 55.e8Q (or 55.h8Q+ Kxh8 56.e8Q+) f1Q 56.h8Q#

That is wrong. 49.f5 is not better than 49.h6. Indeed 49.f5 exf5? 50.g6 wins (or 50.h6) but instead 49.f5 Kg7 is a draw, for instance 50.h6+ Kh7 51.g6+ Kxh6 52.gxf7 Kg7 transposes to the variation you gave above.

EDIT: Only 50... Ke8?? was a decisive mistake (getting too far from the h-pawn) when 51.f5 wins as well as 51.h6

Igor_Goldenberg
18-06-2017, 10:37 AM
You are right, I forgot that the pawn is still on h5 :)

Kevin Bonham
25-02-2018, 09:30 PM
Another one - very good example http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?17113-2018-Queensland-Reserves-and-Tin-Cup&p=435149&viewfull=1#post435149

MichaelBaron
26-02-2018, 12:53 PM
Another one - very good example http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?17113-2018-Queensland-Reserves-and-Tin-Cup&p=435149&viewfull=1#post435149

Yep...black was too focused on ''playing for win'' :)

Kevin Bonham
09-01-2020, 10:35 PM
Women's Challenger chooses pawn ending in preference to unpleasant queen ending but the pawn ending is completely lost

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?17836-FIDE-World-Womens-Champs-Match-Ju-vs-Goryachkina-Jan-5-24&p=459336&viewfull=1#post459336