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samantha
15-01-2011, 10:30 PM
The Age death notices list tf ahat Greg Hjorth died suddenly on January 13th 2011.The cause of death is not yet known.This is a tragedy for chess,and the loss of a dear friend.

Bereaved
15-01-2011, 11:01 PM
That is so sad..........

He will be missed indeed..........

My condolences to his family

Vale Greg,

Take care and God Bless, Malcolm Pyke

the Age tributes page: http://tributes.theage.com.au/

Adamski
15-01-2011, 11:19 PM
That is sad news indeed. My thoughts and prayers are with the family of this well-known Australian chess identity.

Kevin Bonham
15-01-2011, 11:20 PM
Sad loss for chess and mathematics; he was only 47.

Rincewind
15-01-2011, 11:27 PM
Yes indeed a great loss.

NRMASIFD&GKFKBBK
16-01-2011, 12:40 AM
This is very sad. Just around 18-20 months ago, he played (what I believe was) his last competitive chess tournament, the City of Melbourne Open 2009. And now he is no longer with us.

I hope the Melbourne Chess Club and the wider chess community in Victoria and the rest of Australia honour his memory. Perhaps, this year's City of Melbourne Open (which will happen after the Club Championship) can be renamed the Greg Hjorth Memorial.

Of course he was a big part of chess in this country, but he is much more than simply a player - he was also a teacher, researcher and friend. I can imagine that contemparies of Greg - Guy West, Ian Rogers, Darryl Johansen, et al - will be deeply saddened. Finally, we shouldn't forget his family who will miss him.

Vale Gregory Hjorth.

MichaelBaron
16-01-2011, 12:55 AM
This is horrible news. I was priviledged to get to play Greg in some Allegros last year as well as to have some great conversations with him...RIP

Rhubarb
16-01-2011, 01:09 AM
I too am very saddened by this news. Although I only met Greg once, in passing at the Shore Inn in Sydney in the early nineties, players of my generation knew him as a legend of Australian chess even after he moved to the US.

Sutek
16-01-2011, 07:21 AM
Yes, very sad news indeed.
I played Greg a number of times when we were juniors.

ER
16-01-2011, 08:06 AM
Sad news indeed.

I interviewd Greg for ChessChat in July last year

The interview, complete with many other chess personalities comments, can be found here

http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?p=283182#post283182 rest in peace Greg!

RIP Greg

Ian CCC
16-01-2011, 09:03 AM
I remember Greg as a fellow member of Waverley Chess Club and a rising star in Victorian junior chess in the late 70’s. Though a few years their junior, he competed for top honours with the likes of Rogers, Johansen, West and Smith. A brilliant and insightful player and, by all accounts, a brilliant mathematician, it is sad to hear of his untimely passing.

Ian Murray
16-01-2011, 04:25 PM
Very sad news. It was only last week I was reminiscing on Greg's acceptance of my invitation to play in Rocky - http://chesschat.org/showpost.php?p=297941

I saw him again at the 2000 National Open in Las Vegas, but didn't get a chance to talk

Gattaca
16-01-2011, 04:40 PM
I first met Greg when I was in secondary school and I heard that Preshil Primary School had a young boy who was a bit of a chess wizard. Because both Preshil and my school, Era, were so called 'experimental' schools, there was a relationship between the two, with Era getting a lot of Preshil children whose parents wanted progression into a secondary school with a similar framework.

I organised a four game match with the diminutive champion, and after winning the first three games was stunned to be beaten in the fourth game. He could hardly see over the table at that age! I remember telling Greg that he had a lot of talent and should play tournament chess, and that Greg seemed quite surprised and interested. Needless to say I saw a lot more of Greg over the chessboard in the ensuing years!

I'll say a little about Greg's chess, as that is where our lives intersected, and it was important to him, as to nearly all serious tournament players. Greg was a chessplayer with a deep appreciation of the artistic side of the game and he played games of great beauty and subtlety. Interestingly he combined a strong competitive drive with quite a dreamy, dissociated demeanour at the board, almost as if he was playing in a mild trance sometimes.

Something Greg and I had in common as youngsters was a penchant for going barefooted, something that sometimes got us into trouble with tournament officials. In my nonsense poem, "Waverley versus Mars" I recall there was a verse about Greg which ended with the lines, ....who perched upon his chair, and wouldn't do his laces up, because his feet were bare. Greg had a refreshingly anti authoritarian streak which I have more than a suspicion caused him grief in the increasingly hierarchical environment of Melbourne University.

One night Greg and I were playing in an A grade interclub match but our Team Captain had forgotten to tell Greg he was rostered to play. In those days the time limit was 40 moves in 90 minutes, but if you weren't at the board within the first hour you lost on forfeit. With about 20 minutes left before forfeit our Captain rang Greg to see where he was, only to find Greg was already in his pyjamas! Amazingly Greg did a fast change, like Superman in a phone booth, jumped on a tram and arrived with literally less than a minute remaining before forfeit. With only 30 minutes remaining on his clock against his opponents hour and a half, Greg whipped out the swashbuckling Belgrade Gambit and achieved a crushing victory. That kind of charismatic performance, and his attacking style and exceptional results at a very early age, helped to create a larger than life mythology around Greg in the chess scene that persists to this day.

Greg loved, and was well read in, philosophy. He also loved a good argument. I remember once driving to Canberra from Melbourne for the Doeberl Cup and shortly after we left, Greg and Darryl Johansen started arguing some philosophical point. I swear they were still arguing what seemed to be the same philosophical point when we arrived! I don't believe either has ever been defeated in an argument. Darryl was kind enough to be on the receiving end of Greg's 'immortal g-file game'. No doubt Darryl would be able to recall the origin of the saying, "Strong move, Gregory!" I can't remember where it came from.

Unfortunately (for Australian chess at least), Greg's genius for mathematics took him to the United States, where he carved out a distinguished academic career, earning the title of Professor at (I think) UCLA. His chess seems to have gone on the backburner for quite a while. He had already earned the title of International Master and was widely regarded as someone who would inevitably attain the Grandmaster title, but as often happens, other talents and interests intervened. For decades his old friends and sparring partners didn't hear much, though there was a frisson of excitement when he reappeared in a few tournaments in the United States, still playing at a high level. When George Bush junior was elected I received a one word e-mail from Greg that said only, "Aaaaaaaarrrrrrrrgh!"

Then Greg came back to Australia and we had the great pleasure of becoming reacquainted. Greg admitted to me that when we were young chessboard rivals there were times he hated me, and we laughed about that. We had so much shared history, so we were both very happy to reconnect, and any past rivalries only added to the texture of our friendship. People who have grown up together and shared travel, triumphs, defeats and defining experiences like representing Australia at Olympiads, can find that the intervening years are trivial, and so it was with Greg. He was one of the few old friends from chess I was able to invite to my small wedding, but due to his travel plans it wasn't to be.

I was very sad when, after a lot of soul searching, he decided to go back to the US permanently. He told me privately he was 'divorcing' Australia. I had the feeling that Greg was still searching for something, that perhaps he had something of a restless soul. No doubt having a foot in each of two cultures can be a lonely experience and it's sad that Australia, his true home, couldn't provide the environment for a person of Greg's abilities to flourish professionally. I think as a country Australia needs to reassess its direction in some areas. It's nice to win lots of swimming medals, but mathematics and hard science underpins the whole modern way of life, and the brain drain from our shores can't be good for us long term.

When I heard yesterday that Greg had died suddenly I was deeply shocked. Why do the brightest stars often go too early? My deepest sympathies go to his loved ones. Greg was a person of great complexity, with a great capacity for warmth and love. He would greet his friends, male and female, with a big hug and usually some greeting like, "I'm so glad to see you". He was an unforgettable person, with a diverse and eclectic group of friends. His brilliant mind, inquisitiveness, love of philosophy and humour will be missed by so many of us.

I'm not part of Greg's family, who must be devastated, I'm just a friend and fellow chessplayer, yet I feel like a unique part of the jigsaw of my life has gone missing.

Rest in peace, Greg.

Grant Szuveges
16-01-2011, 09:19 PM
I didn't know Greg particularly well and only knew him for 2 years. However in the time I knew him, I was so impressed! The following enigmatic story seems to capture what Greg was about fairly well:

On the opening night of the 2009 City Of Melbourne Open, I was was collecting entry fees when Greg turned up to play blitz with Erik Teichmann. He had no idea that the tournament was even on! Yet surprisingly, it took almost no convincing to get him to play in the tournament, despite the fact that he had not played tournament chess in years! The publicity which his presence in the event gave our then struggling club was amazing and I will never forget it! But there is more! As well as playing in the event, Greg also forked out $150 for a Melbourne Chess Club membership - he didn't need to become a member to play in the tournament, yet generously bought one anyway. I have got no idea what made Greg decide to make a chess comeback there and then, but I am sure that it was not for the prizemoney, as he wasn't able to even play in the final 2 rounds of the event as he would be overseas at the time. I suspect that he decided to play either to help out the MCC, or because he simply wanted to play chess and have fun. Whatever the reason though, he presence in the tournament gave our club a huge amount of 'street cred' at a time when we needed it most!

Greg also regularly frequented my favourite coffee shop - The Gypsy Bar, on Brunswick Street. I actually saw him there on New Years Eve. He was reading a book and drinking a coffee or a beer (I don't remember which) and he seemed happy and relaxed and he wished me a happy new year. I may even have seen him there since then too. He was very popular figure at the Gypsy Bar and the staff were shocked at the news of his passing. It was known that he was a strong chess player, yet he often played chess there against people who had never even played tournament chess before. These people got such a kick out of playing him!

My favourite Greg Hjorth game is not a particularly well known one - but it is one which shows another side to his chess - that he was also an exceptional positional player! In this game, against Peter Parr in the 1980 Australian Championship, Greg played 1. d4 and then exchanged pawns with dxe5 in a Kings Indian Defence. He then went on to play a positional masterpiece, convincingly beating his opponent with the open d-file and queenside space advantage. What was so memorable about this game though, was that he made it all look so easy... The game can be seen in Ian Rogers' book "Australian Chess Into The Eighties".

Rest in peace Greg, you will be greatly missed at Melbourne Chess Club and at the Gypsy Bar.

Tony Dowden
16-01-2011, 09:48 PM
I didn't get to know Greg but back in the 1980s I know Kiwi players regarded as one of the most talented of a fiercesomely strong generation of young Aussie players. RIP

Paul Cavezza
17-01-2011, 12:30 AM
Terrible news. I remember a couple of the crazy games he played with Michael last year, in one he agreed a draw laughing saying Yes, because I have no idea what's happening in this position! It was nice to have such a personality out the front of the club talking philosophy, chess and whatever else.

Jesper Norgaard
17-01-2011, 02:19 AM
That is very sad news indeed.

I played Greg Hjorth only once, in Junior WC in Mexico 1981, but still got the impression from that single game that he was a true gentleman. He thanked me warmly when I resigned the game in move 31, in a perhaps pretty resignable position, but Greg was short of time going up to move 40. He was just relieved that I didn't try to "blitz him", but lesser mortals would not have reacted like that. Anyway he was not that short of time - I would not have resisted the temptation to continue if he had only had 15 seconds left.

Rest in peace, Greg.

Capablanca-Fan
17-01-2011, 03:13 AM
Darryl was kind enough to be on the receiving end of Greg's 'immortal g-file game'.

This one?
[Event "Commonwealth Ch"]
[Site "Melbourne, Australia"]
[Date "1983.??.??"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Greg Hjorth"]
[Black "Darryl K Johansen"]
[ECO "A01"]

1.b3 e5 2.Bb2 d6 3.c4 g6 4.d4 Bg7 5.e3 f5 6.dxe5 Nd7 7.Nf3 dxe5 8.Qc2 Nh6 9.Nc3 0-0 10.0-0-0 Nf7 11.e4 f4 12.h4 c6 13.h5 g5 14.h6 Bf6 15.g3 Qe7 16.Rg1 Kh8 17.gxf4 gxf4 18.Ne2 Rg8 19.Bh3 Rxg1 20.Rxg1 Nf8 21.Nxf4!! Ng5 [21...exf4 22.Qc3! Bxc3 23.Bxc3+ Ne5 24.Nxe5 and mating with a double check, unless black gives up heaps of material] 22.Nxe5 Nxh3 23.Nxh3 Bxh3 24.Qc3 Bg5+ 25.f4 Bxf4+ 26.Kb1 {mates in two, thanks again to that deadly diagonal and g-file} 1-0

Another good scalp:
[Event "Brighton"]
[Site "Brighton"]
[Date "1984.??.??"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Anthony Miles"]
[Black "Greg Hjorth"]
[ECO "D34"]

1.d4 e6 2.c4 d5 3.Nc3 c5 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.g3 Be7 7.Bg2
Nf6 8.O-O O-O 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Bg5 d4 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.Nd5 Qd8
13.Nd2 a6 14.Rc1 Ba7 15.Re1 Re8 16.Qb3 Rb8 17.Nf4 Re5 18.Nc4
Rb5 19.Qa3 Nb4 20.Nd3 Nxd3 21.Qxd3 Be6 22.b3 Qe7 23.Nd2 Re8
24.Be4 g6 25.Rc2 Bg4 26.Rec1 Bb6 27.Kh1 Re5 28.f3 f5 29.Qc4+
Kg7 30.Bd3 Bh3 31.b4 Rxe2 32.Bxe2 Qxe2 33.Rg1 d3 34.Qc3+ Kh6
35.Rcc1 Bxg1 36.Rxg1 Qf2 37.Qc1 f4 38.Qc7 Bg2+ 0-1

Javier Gil
17-01-2011, 07:12 AM
You've gotta be kididng me, this is just absolutely shocking! :(

I was very disappointed to learn that the wikipedia has nothing on Greg, but luckily, the efficent Germans do have something on him:

Hjorth, the son of a neurologist in Melbourne, studied in Melbourne and did his doctorate in 1993 at the University of California, Berkeley, in W. Hugh Woodin (The influence of N two ). He was a professor at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and was a professor at the University of Melbourne .
In 2003 he received the Karp Prize with Alexander S. Kechris for her work on Borel equivalence relations, especially countable Borel equivalence relations and applications in the theory of turbulence .
In 2010 he held the Tarski Lectures .

Hjorth is an accomplished chess player . In 1983 he was Commonwealth champion. Since 1984 he has been an International Master .

Source (translated by google): http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregory_Hjorth


Website at UCLA (with some very insightful personal comments about mathematics and logic): http://www.math.ucla.edu/~greg/
The Tarski lectures: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarski_Lectures
Website at Melbourne University: http://www.ms.unimelb.edu.au/Personnel/profile.php?PC_id=376
The Karp prize (which, by the way, is only awarded once every 5 years): http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karp-Preis

-------------------------------------------

I didn't really know Greg all that much.
When I lived in Sydney as a teenager, back in the eighties, he was one of the strongest players in the country.
I did meet him a couple of times in tournaments, and also got to know him a little at Thessalonikki Chess Olympiad.
I had a great admiration for his chess, not so much because he was such a strong player, but because his ideas seemed so creative. I've met many Masters and Grand Masters, some of them amongst the best players in the world, but there was a unique quality about Greg's chess that made him stand out from others. What was it? well, it's like he always looked at positions with different eyes, he could see things that others could not. Even in very simple positions he would come up with rather unusual ideas.
You know, sometimes your mind compares itself to the minds of others, and mine often told me: "there's no way I could have come up with such an idea"!
So, yeah, that's how I define chess talent... and his was out of the ordinary. Way out of the ordinary!
I watched his games and he didnīt play what everybody else did, he actually had his own ideas in many opening systems.
Someone has mentioned that great game that he played against Tony Miles. I added some notes to it a long time ago. This was a terrific effort by Greg, and you're not going to see many games of Miles where he gets so clearly outplayed.


Event: Brigton
White: Miles, Tony
Black: Hjorth, Greg
Result: 0-1
ECO: D34
Annotator: I.M.Javier Gil
PlyCount: 76
EventDate: 1984.08.??
EventRounds: 11
EventCountry: ENG

1. d4 e6 2. c4 d5 3. Nc3 c5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. g3 Be7 7. Bg2 Nf6 8. O-O O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 {Javier: In the Tarrasch defence black accepts the weakness of the isolated P in return for piece activity. In this game we'll see how dangerous can an isolated P become if it's not kept under control at all times.} 10. Bg5 d4 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nd5 (12. Ne4 {Javier: This is tempting, but in the resulting position black has a good game.} Qe7 13. Nxc5 Qxc5 {Javier: Black has an easy game and he can build some pressure against e2 with his RR. Things would be different if black's d P was still on d5 and white had time to play e3 (fixing the weaknes of d5).}) 12... Qd8 13. Nd2 a6 14. Rc1 Ba7 15. Re1 Re8 16. Qb3 Rb8 17. Nf4 Re5 {! Javier: This interesting R lift was a novelty at the time. Black's R will be very active on b5. Previously, only 17...Bd7 had been tried. To this day, I'm not sure if this was a prepared novelty, but I wouldn't be surprised if this was simply and idea that Greg came up with during the game,} 18. Nc4 Rb5 19. Qa3 Nb4 {!} 20. Nd3 {Javier: White seems to have blockaded the P on d4,but black simply exchanges this N.} Nxd3 21. Qxd3 (21. exd3 {!?}) {Javier: As we already know, the Q is not a good blockader.} 21... Be6 22. b3 Qe7 23. Nd2 Re8 24. Be4 g6 25. Rc2 Bg4 {Javier: Black has managed to build some pressure along the e-file.} 26. Rec1 (26. Bf3 {?} Bf5 {!}) 26... Bb6 27. Kh1 Re5 28. f3 f5 {!} 29. Qc4+ Kg7 30. Bd3 {Javier: d4 is permanently blocked now, but a sacrifice on e2 is now possible...} Bh3 31. b4 (31. Nf1) 31... Rxe2 {!} 32. Bxe2 Qxe2 33. Rg1 (33. Qxe2 Rxe2 34. Nb3 Bg2+ 35. Kg1 d3+ {!} {-+}) 33... d3 {! Javier: The advance of the P releases the energy of the B at b6.} 34. Qc3+ Kh6 35. Rcc1 Bxg1 36. Rxg1 Qf2 37. Qc1 {Javier: A little trap...} f4 {!} (37... Bg2+ {?? Javier: This was tempting, but white has a trick.} 38. Rxg2 Re1+ 39. Nf1+ {! Javier: Check!} Rxc1 40. Rxf2 d2 41. Rxd2 Rxf1+ 42. Kg2 Rb1 43. a3 Rb3 {=/+}) 38. Qc7 Bg2+ {Javier: And white resigned. A wonderful game by Hjorth.} 0-1

Javier Gil
17-01-2011, 07:16 AM
There are some problems with the viewer. I tried to upload the pgn file but to no avail.
Anyway, here's a .png image with the notes.

Rincewind
17-01-2011, 09:09 AM
There are some problems with the viewer. I tried to upload the pgn file but to no avail.

No fixed above. Please PM me if you want the details of the problem.

peter_parr
17-01-2011, 01:57 PM
An obituary was published in the SMH today.
SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/newsindex.htm)

Greg was one of the strongest ever Australian International Masters.
Professor Meyer once told me that Hjorth was the most brilliant academic student he had ever taught.


My favourite Greg Hjorth game is not a particularly well known one - but it is one which shows another side to his chess - that he was also an exceptional positional player! In this game, against Peter Parr in the 1980 Australian Championship,

Yes Grant you are correct. Greg beat me decisively in Adelaide Jan 1980 at the age of 16.

I met Greg again at the 1982 Olympiad in Switzerland and many Doeberl Cups. You could never meet a nicer person. His death at age 47 is so very sad.

Siamesecatsrule
17-01-2011, 04:17 PM
As a young Victorian chess player in the 1970s who played in several Victorian Championships and the 1975/1976 Australian Championship before giving the game away in the middle of 1977 I got to know that prodigiously talented group of Victorian youngsters which included Ian Rogers, Guy West, Darryl Johansen and Greg Hjorth.

I had the pleasure of catching up with Ian and Darryl at Guy's wedding and was looking forward to catching up with Greg and was disappointed when I found out he was unable to attend.

I didn't play tournament chess for very many years, and Greg was on the chess scene for a good number of them. I recall Greg was this amazing young chess talent - a longish haired, cool looking kid, with a cheeky smile, wearing no shoes, who looked like he could be a rock star, sitting totally composed and relaxed at the chess board, as if in total control. It must have been pretty intimidating for the older chess players of many years' experience as their positions went from bad to worse.

I don't think I ever played Greg in a tournament game. I thought I played Greg
in the 1977 Box Hill Golden Jubilee Open won brilliantly by Ian with 9/9 from Jamieson 8/9 and myself 7/9, but a search of the score sheets and it was Darryl I played. But I'm pretty sure I had the privilege of playing Greg in lightning chess and helping in analysing a number of his games.

Only last year Guy was telling me a humorous story about Greg, bringing
Greg very much to life. I never imagined Greg would be taken from us at such a young age, while still in his prime. It also makes me realise how wrong
I was not to have made an active attempt to catch up with Greg. I guess I just assumed that Greg would always be with us so there was plenty of time. It's a regret I'll now have to live with.

Such a kind, talented person deserved to live many more years. Life's not fair. It really sucks at times.

Rest in peace Greg.
I will never forget you.

Neil Davis.

Capablanca-Fan
18-01-2011, 07:06 AM
Yes Grant you are correct. Greg beat me decisively in Adelaide Jan 1980 at the age of 16.

I met Greg again at the 1982 Olympiad in Switzerland and many Doeberl Cups. You could never meet a nicer person. His death at age 47 is so very sad.
[Event "AUS-ch"]
[Site "Adelaide"]
[Date "1980.01.04"]
[Round "8.4"]
[White "Hjorth, Greg"]
[Black "Parr, Peter"]
[Result "1-0"]
[BlackElo "2075"]
[ChessCat "CHESSCAT 1.0"]
[ECO "E92"]
[EventDate "1979.12.??"]
[PlyCount "115"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1998.11.10"]
[WhiteElo "1955"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e4 d6 6. Be2 e5 7. dxe5 dxe5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 9. Bg5 Re8 10. O-O-O Na6 11. Ne1 Be6 12. f3 c6 13. Nc2 Nc7 14. Rd2 Red8 15. Rhd1 Rxd2 16. Rxd2 Kf8 17. Be3 Ke8 18. b4 Bf8 19. Kb2 b6 20. b5 cxb5 21. cxb5 Be7 22. a3 Rd8 23. Rxd8+ Kxd8 24. Na2 Bd7 25. a4 Kc8 26. Na3 Nfe8 27. Nc4 f6 28. Bxb6 axb6 29. Nxb6+ Kd8 30. Nxd7 Kxd7 31. b6 Ne6 32. Bb5+ Kd8 33. b7 Bd6 34. Nb4 Nd4 35. Na6 Nxb5 36. axb5 Ng7 37. Kc3 Ne6 38. Kc4 Kd7 39. b8=Q Bxb8 40. Nxb8+ Kc7 41. Na6+ Kd6 42. Nb4 f5 43. Nd3 fxe4 44. fxe4 Ng5 45. Nc5 Nf7 46. Kb4 Nd8 47. b6 Nc6+ 48. Kb5 Nd4+ 49. Kc4 Nc6 50. b7 h5 51. h4 Nb8 52. Kb5 Nc6 53. Na6 Na7+ 54. Kc4 Nc6 55. b8=Q+ Nxb8 56. Nxb8 Ke6 57. Kc5 Kf6 58. Kd6 1-0

Igor_Goldenberg
18-01-2011, 09:24 AM
That's tragic news.

pballard
19-01-2011, 11:09 AM
Tragic news.

I know Greg mainly from a time he spent in Adelaide while I was president of the Adelaide University chess club in the 80s. He took a turn manning the table at orientation week, even though he had no connection to the club. It was quite a sight seeing random students playing him, having no idea this was one of the top players in the country.

He also took the time to write a column for Alan Goldsmith's short-lived SA chess newsletter (CaisSA). I always found him friendly, and giving me a welcoming hello at my occasional tournament appearances.

My condolences to his family.

Peter Ballard

Grant Szuveges
19-01-2011, 11:23 PM
Hi everyone

Here are the details about Gregs funeral - copied and pasted from the facebook page dedicated to Greg (from Claire Watson):

Hi all,

The details for Greg's funeral are as follows:

11am Service at the Brunswick Uniting Church, 212/214 Sydney Rd Brunswick, followed by refreshments at The Sporting Club Hotel, 27 Weston Street, Brunswick.

Free parking is available at Barkly Square Shopping centre, just off Sydney Rd between Weston and Barkly streets. From there, the Church is a short one and half blocks walk north on Sydney Rd. For anyone who is not familiar with Sydney Rd, parking here will be a lot easier than finding a park right near the Church.

Please pass these details on to anyone who might not otherwise know.

Thanks,
Claire

NRMASIFD&GKFKBBK
19-01-2011, 11:32 PM
Hi everyone

Here are the details about Gregs funeral - copied and pasted from the facebook page dedicated to Greg (from Claire Watson):

Hi all,

The details for Greg's funeral are as follows:

11am Service at the Brunswick Uniting Church, 212/214 Sydney Rd Brunswick, followed by refreshments at The Sporting Club Hotel, 27 Weston Street, Brunswick.

Free parking is available at Barkly Square Shopping centre, just off Sydney Rd between Weston and Barkly streets. From there, the Church is a short one and half blocks walk north on Sydney Rd. For anyone who is not familiar with Sydney Rd, parking here will be a lot easier than finding a park right near the Church.

Please pass these details on to anyone who might not otherwise know.

Thanks,
Claire

I think you forgot to specify what day it is on.

ER
19-01-2011, 11:32 PM
Hi Grant could you please provide the date?

antichrist
19-01-2011, 11:40 PM
http://www.onlinetributes.com.au/Greg_Hjorth

in case it has not been posted before

Grant Szuveges
19-01-2011, 11:49 PM
I think you forgot to specify what day it is on.

Oh, this Friday (2 days from now) 21st of January

NRMASIFD&GKFKBBK
20-01-2011, 12:17 AM
Oh, this Friday (2 days from now) 21st of January

Thanks

bobby1972
20-01-2011, 11:33 PM
very sad to hear this,the man was a genius to be able to be so good and still play such beautiful games.

ER
21-01-2011, 12:20 AM
For a tribute to Greg HJorth with references to the Melbourne Chess Club and the ChessChat Forum (with link to Greg's interview here) please follow this

http://www.onlinetributes.com.au/Greg_Hjorth/memorial/

Sheroff
23-01-2011, 09:25 PM
I met Greg (and played against him in Round 5 or 6, I think) at the 1985 Australian Open in Ballarat, the first major Aussie tournament I ever played in. He was back then a good-natured young man at the peak of his chess powers.

Of all the games in my book Australian Chess Brilliancies, my definite favourite is his astonishing and famous win against Johansen - it transcended mere tactical efficiency and belongs firmly in the realm of the highest chess art. I believe genius is an accurate descriptive term for this amazing man. Rest in peace, Greg.

Kevin Casey

antichrist
25-01-2011, 03:59 PM
Ian Rogers column in this week's Byron Echo is about Greg, his antics from when a junior and including his career. the link is in Ian Roers column thread

Metro
25-01-2011, 04:30 PM
Ian Rogers column in this week's Byron Echo is about Greg, his antics from when a junior and including his career. the link is in Ian Roers column thread
See page 26
http://issuu.com/echopublications/docs/echo_25_33?mode=embed&layout=http%3A%2F%2Fskin.issuu.com%2Fv%2Flight%2Fl ayout.xml&showFlipBtn=true

Watto
28-01-2011, 12:56 AM
This is a beautiful, photographic tribute which was played at Greg's funeral. So very sad. Rest in peace, Greg.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m86FL8jLHwY

Bereaved
08-02-2011, 07:12 AM
Hi everyone,

this is to be published in today's edition of The Age

http://www.theage.com.au/national/australia-loses-a-worldclass-maths-wizard-and-chess-champ-20110207-1ak6a.html

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Metro
08-02-2011, 04:38 PM
Any thoughts on a Greg Hjorth Memorial(tournament)?

Metro
08-02-2011, 08:33 PM
In memoriam http://droopy.math.ucla.edu/drupal/content/memoriam-greg-hjorth-professor-mathematics-1963-%E2%80%93-2011

Tony Dowden
03-03-2011, 07:37 PM
I didn't get to know Greg but back in the 1980s I know Kiwi players regarded as one of the most talented of a fiercesomely strong generation of young Aussie players. RIP

Here's a wonderful tribute page from UCLA, California that I don't think has been posted here yet http://www.math.ucla.edu/pictures/hjorth_tributes.pdf

ER
03-03-2011, 08:08 PM
Here's a wonderful tribute page from UCLA, California that I don't think has been posted here yet http://www.math.ucla.edu/pictures/hjorth_tributes.pdf

Thanks Tony, that's a fitting tribute to Greg by the people with whom he worked, studied and taught!

Watto
12-03-2011, 12:23 AM
Here's a wonderful tribute page from UCLA, California that I don't think has been posted here yet http://www.math.ucla.edu/pictures/hjorth_tributes.pdf
The tributes are actually from a booklet printed for Greg's memorial service in Melbourne - uploaded by UCLA.

Tony Dowden
12-03-2011, 08:02 AM
The tributes are actually from a booklet printed for Greg's memorial service in Melbourne - uploaded by UCLA.

Thanks for the explanation Jean :)

Ian Murray
05-05-2012, 08:58 PM
Greg is not forgotten. Ruth LeFaive in Los Angeles has donated USD50 to the Olympiad Fund "in loving memory of IM Greg Hjorth"

Ruth
05-07-2012, 02:35 PM
Thank you, Ian. He is constantly remembered.