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michael.mcguirk
23-04-2010, 06:11 PM
A nice endgame study devised from a game played in Yugoslavia in 1970.

Black is a rook up, but White's connected passed pawns are very strong.

I disagree with the ending played, but it's not commented on in the book.

What should the end result be?

K1k5/2r3pp/P4p2/1P6/8/5P1P/8/8 w - - 0 1

EDIT: Black to move! Whoops!

Carl Gorka
23-04-2010, 06:44 PM
Who is to move?

michael.mcguirk
23-04-2010, 07:02 PM
Who is to move?

Lol sorry! Black.

Carl Gorka
23-04-2010, 07:20 PM
Lol sorry! Black.

ok, then off the top of my head I'm guessing black wins as after the rook heads down the board, it can come behind the b-pawn. Maybe there are some stalemate possibilities in the corner, but I haven't looked that deeply yet.:)

Desmond
23-04-2010, 08:06 PM
...Rc6 looks tricky

Kevin Bonham
23-04-2010, 08:44 PM
Worth looking at with white to move too - white wins but it is slightly trickier than it may look.

michael.mcguirk
24-04-2010, 01:48 AM
Worth looking at with white to move too - white wins but it is slightly trickier than it may look.

True, slightly. Fairly easy though compared to the original puzzle.

1. b6 Rc6 2. b7+ Kd7 3. b8=N+ Kc7 4. Nxc6 Kxc6 5. Kb8 1-0

michael.mcguirk
24-04-2010, 01:57 AM
ok, then off the top of my head I'm guessing black wins as after the rook heads down the board, it can come behind the b-pawn.

Comes behind the b pawn, locks white with the a6-b7 combo as either move forces a stalemate position, but freezes the position of the rook and pawns. The idea doesn't work. Example line:

1... Rc1 2. b6 Rb1 3. b7+ Kc7 4. h4 then what? There's nothing that will allow black to avoid the stalemate without giving up the game.

Jesper Norgaard
24-04-2010, 06:37 AM
I think Bent Larsen has this puzzle in one of his combination collections (a book in Danish). Out of the top of my head:


1...Rc6! 2.bxc6 (2.Ka7,Kc7-+) 2...g5 3.a7,h5 (4.f4,h4!) 4.c7,h4 5.f4,g4 6.hxg4,h3 (6.f5,Kxc7 7.hxg4,h3) etc. ... h1=Q+ mate

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2010, 01:10 PM
Re#8,

After 4.h4 Black plays ...g5. When White tries to stalemate by running himself out of pawn moves, eg 5.h5 Black has 5...Rb6! Now 6.Ka7 f5 7.h6 g4 8.f4 Rxa6!! 9.Kxa6 Kb8 and black wins.

This idea works in many lines. White cannot promote and then self-stalemate by moving pawns because that gives Black time for Rb6 lifting the stalemate and mating. White must use up several pawn moves first but this gives black time to set up a winning pawn break on the other side and play ...Rb6-a6 at the last possible moment to avert the stalemate.

I think 1...Rcx wins where x is any of 1-6

Jesper Norgaard
24-04-2010, 06:13 PM
Re#10,

This is in fact exercise 20 of "Practical Endgames" of Bent Larsen, the game is Milenkovic-Stankov Yugoslavia 1968. 1...Rc6! was played in the game, but the winning method given by Kevin seems to work equally well, for all moves 1...Rc1 to 1...Rc5 going to the b-file with the rook, and having Rb6 as a key move in the continuation, aiming for the sacrifice Rxa6+.

Carl Gorka
24-04-2010, 07:27 PM
Comes behind the b pawn, locks white with the a6-b7 combo as either move forces a stalemate position, but freezes the position of the rook and pawns. The idea doesn't work. Example line:

1... Rc1 2. b6 Rb1 3. b7+ Kc7 4. h4 then what? There's nothing that will allow black to avoid the stalemate without giving up the game.

1..Rc1 2. b6 Rb1 3. b7+ Kc7 4. h4 Rb6 5. Ka7 g6 6.f4 h6 and after white advances either king side pawn black takes, then takes the a-pawn and plays Kb8. eg. 7. f5 exf5 8 .h5 Rxa6+ 9. Kxa6 Kb8.

Perhaps I've missed something? I haven't looked too deeply.