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soupman_2
09-04-2010, 01:22 PM
http://www.anand-topalov.com/

Game 1 - Friday 23 April - 10 pm (Aust EST)

Kevin Bonham
09-04-2010, 01:37 PM
I've put a poll on it so people can have a go at picking the outcome.

Kevin Bonham
10-04-2010, 09:17 PM
Anand is quite heavily favoured by bookmakers:

Bwin Anand 11/17 Topalov 11/10
Betfair Anand 33/50 Topalov 53/50

Interesting given that Topalov is younger and at home and marginally higher rated.

Jesper Norgaard
16-04-2010, 03:47 PM
I reckon there is at least 70% chance that the match will be decided in the ordinary 12 games, and then I reckon there would be at least 70% chance that the match is decided in the 4 rapid games. If it is still a tie, there will be a set of 5 matches of double-blitz (white+black) with 5 minutes and 3 seconds increment per move. I don't know how high the chance is here that any of the 5 matches decides the winner, but it must be even higher than 70%. If there is still a tie, then the event will be decided in the dreaded Armageddon game.

My gut feeling is that there is only 1%-2% probability that the Armageddon game will take place. Black receives 4 minutes, and White 5 minutes. If it's a draw, then Black wins. No increment is present until move 61 when each player receives 3 seconds per move. In my opinion this favors black hugely, since both players have a very good defence, so a draw is not too unlikely especially since black will be eager to clinch it (perpetual check or threat, sacrifice from superior position to non-losing ending etc.). I would call this close to a flip of a coin, because the black player has too much advantage.

Are the Armageddon rules fair? I sort of liked the bidding-procedure in the US championship where each player could bid on how many minutes (less) they would accept with black, e.g. 5-4, 5˝-3˝, 6-3 etc. this is just my example not an accurate description of the US ch. rules.

Kevin Bonham
16-04-2010, 06:00 PM
My gut feeling is that there is only 1%-2% probability that the Armageddon game will take place.

I think it could be an even lower probability than that, even given the evenness of the two players' playing strengths. In the World Cup using the same tiebreak system 55 matches made it to the rapid stage, but if my calculations are correct then only one of those 55 made it past the second blitz match, and that was Akobian-Tregubov, decided in the fifth blitz match.


Are the Armageddon rules fair? I sort of liked the bidding-procedure in the US championship where each player could bid on how many minutes (less) they would accept with black, e.g. 5-4, 5˝-3˝, 6-3 etc. this is just my example not an accurate description of the US ch. rules.

The system in the Krush-Zatonskih incident in 2008 was that a player (determined by coin toss) selected the time control for the Armageddon game and then the opponent got to choose which colour they would take on those terms. Not sure if they kept it for 2009 or changed it.

Such systems are often "fairer" but they do introduce an element of non-chess skill which in my view is a strong argument against them.

ER
18-04-2010, 11:29 AM
All systems devised to decide World Championship Matches, apart from the traditional way are crappy and should be abolished!

Garvinator
18-04-2010, 08:30 PM
www.susanpolgar.blogspot.com and www.chessbase.com can not agree.

Susan's site already has Anand in Sofia and checked into his hotel. Chessbase has him not in Bulgaria at all.

Very strange indeed.

Kevin Bonham
18-04-2010, 08:58 PM
All systems devised to decide World Championship Matches, apart from the traditional way are crappy and should be abolished!

Which "traditional way" was that? There were several different match formats used before the FIDE-Kasparov split. If it was the system of a long match to a set number of games where in the case of a tie the champion retains, I also preferred that system over the present. The problem is that with the old style 24 game matches supposedly being no longer viable (for reasons not entirely clear to me), in the shorter 12-game matches, draw odds to the champion gives the champion too great an advantage.

Kevin Bonham
18-04-2010, 09:07 PM
www.susanpolgar.blogspot.com and www.chessbase.com can not agree.

Susan's site already has Anand in Sofia and checked into his hotel. Chessbase has him not in Bulgaria at all.

Polgar's site is basing its reporting on a Times of India item that is dated 18 April. The Chessbase item is based 17 April quoting matter published on 18 April but possibly written earlier. It could be that a way was found for Anand to make the journey in the intervening time, or the Times of India report could be wrong, or there could be some silly business going on.

The speed of updating of news on Chessbase has been unimpressive in recent years. They are often a whole day out of date on major event news, sometimes two. Used to be better than that.

Garvinator
19-04-2010, 12:17 AM
Here is the latest. http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/04/world-championship-postponement.html

I can not seem to be able to post the whole link as I am getting a 404 error.

Kevin Bonham
19-04-2010, 01:07 AM
How odd. It sounds like Anand is indeed stranded and the info that the organisers have from the hotel is simply wrong.

Jesper Norgaard
19-04-2010, 09:18 AM
How odd. It sounds like Anand is indeed stranded and the info that the organisers have from the hotel is simply wrong.
To my understanding Anand's second Schmitt picked up all keys to the Anand quarters and they hotel organisers took that to mean that Anand was in town too but had not appeared :) a bit of the Hans Christian Andersen story how 3 feathers became 10 chicken :(

In my opinion if Anand loses days in his travel program to Bulgaria because (much of) European air space is sealed off, it would be reasonable to grant him those days extra and suspend the match. Whether that is 1, 2, 5 days we can't tell yet. But official silence could be because until he is actually in Sofia, we can't measure how much time he lost on traveling. Topa has a natural advantage in this respect by living in the country, not having to travel as much, so it would be fair to try and wipe all "Toiletgate" suspicions off the board by agreeing on this.

Is Danailov the devil? Well, we will see, but the Icelandic ashes surely came at an opportune time to disturb the opponent to the maximum. Maybe he sold his soul to the devil for a volcano outbreak? If he tries to take advantage of this instead of agreeing to a reasonable suspension, all the rumors would have been true about his bias. I am afraid that FIDE's soul has already been sold for 3 million :evil:

Kevin Bonham
19-04-2010, 12:36 PM
Latest I have seen is http://www.chessdom.com/topalov-anand-2010/anand-topalov-2010 :


The latest news regarding the situation around the World Chess Championship is that Viswanathan Anand is traveling to Sofia. The organizing committee issued several staments and opinions earlier this afternoon, and after meeting with FIDE they announced, "Our latest information is that Anand is traveling to Sofia. We will have official statement later tonight or tomorrow." No more information was shared, nor what type of vehicle Anand is using to get to the venue.

ER
19-04-2010, 07:39 PM
Which "traditional way" was that?

The 24 game match format with the Champion retaining the crown in case of a 12 all tie but with a proviso of a return 12 game match within the next 6 months.

If that ends as a tie too, then the World Champion retains the title and the challenger is guaranteed a place in the quarter or semi-finals of the next candidates series.

The candidates could be decided by a series of elimination as in Football World Cup format

Kevin Bonham
19-04-2010, 09:02 PM
The 24 game match format with the Champion retaining the crown in case of a 12 all tie but with a proviso of a return 12 game match within the next 6 months.

As far as I can determine the 24-game format with champion retaining if 12-12 was used from 1951 to 1972 and from 1985 to 1993 (the last being Kasparov-Short outside FIDE auspices). In between that, the two Karpov-Korchnoi matches and the aborted Kasparov-Karpov epic were first to six wins.

There were various arrangements concerning rematch rights if the champion was defeated. I don't know offhand whether any of the 24-game matches had an explicit provision for what happened if there was a rematch and the result of the rematch was 12-12 and would be interested in any information about that.

Carl Gorka
19-04-2010, 09:56 PM
Anand is stranded in Frankfurt....the Indian Chess Federation have sent a letter to FIDE asking for a postponement for the match.

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6265

The best bit is the start to the letter addressed to "His Highness Kirsan ILYUMZHINOV":lol: :lol:

ER
19-04-2010, 10:06 PM
Anand is stranded in Frankfurt....the Indian Chess Federation have sent a letter to FIDE asking for a postponement for the match.
What??? he might as well have walked to the venue, not that far!!! :P


The best bit is the start to the letter addressed to "His Highness Kirsan ILYUMZHINOV":lol: :lol:
lol, yep they should have adhered to the proper protocol and used "Your Majesty"! :P :lol:

Carl Gorka
19-04-2010, 10:16 PM
What??? he might as well have walked to the venue, not that far!!! :P

I'm pretty sure there'd be loads of German chess fans willing to give him a lift:D



lol, yep they should have adhered to the proper protocol and used "Your Majesty"! :P :lol:

We could start a game here....most suitable title for the current FIDE President :lol:

ER
19-04-2010, 10:35 PM
We could start a game here....most suitable title for the current FIDE President :lol:
lol ok I start with
Big Chak Hack Schawak :lol:
My godson called me that, I don't know where he got it! :P

some variations to fit chess could be
Big Shah Hack Schawak
Big Chak Hack Checkwak
or Big Chess Hack Shahwak
lol add lib!

Carl Gorka
19-04-2010, 10:51 PM
lol ok I start with
Big Chak Hack Schawak :lol:
My godson called me that, I don't know where he got it! :P

some variations to fit chess could be
Big Shah Hack Schawak
Big Chak Hack Checkwak
or Big Chess Hack Shahwak
lol add lib!

New thread started in general chess chat before we take this one over:D

Garvinator
19-04-2010, 10:54 PM
My personal view- the skullduggery begins and this shows the absurdity of having the match run by one of the participants own country, especially when it is Bulgaria. When can I start to blame FIDE again?

http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/04/statement-by-wc-organizers.html


World Championship match Anand - Topalov postponement possibilities (updated)
official statement by the organizers
Update: April 19th, 12:00 CET

The organizing committee of the World Championship match between Anand and Topalov officially issued a statement regarding the situation that arose in the previous days (scroll down for timeline). The news was reported live from Chessdom.com correspondents in Sofia.

The following statement is official answer to the letter of Viswanathan Anand.

FROM STEFAN SERGIEV

TO MR. GEORGIOS MAKROPOULOS

DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF FIDE AND SUPERVISOR OF THE MATCH FOR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP ANAND – TOPALOV

Copy Mr. V. Anand – World champion
Copy Mr. V. Topalov

Dear Mr. Makropoulos,

The Organizers committee of the match for world championship 2010 between V. Anand, world champion and V. Topalov has been informed with the e-mail of Mr. Anand dated 17.04 and your verbal request from 18.04.2010 to postpone the match with 3 days.

We would like to inform you that this is not acceptable for us.

1. We can postpone the press conference.

2. Unfortunately we can not postpone the opening ceremony scheduled on April 21st at 6 pm. according to the contract. The invitations to all the official guests, sponsors, politicians, TV stations and all the media was already sent long time ago. We have signed a lot of commercial contracts with serious penalties for us in case of some changes.

3. The possibility to postpone the first game of the match for one day to Saturday April 24 need to be discussed with the Chairman of Organizing Committee– Prime Minister of Bulgaria Mr. Boyko Borissov. This will take some time. We will inform you regarding our decision not later than latest afternoon of 20 April /Tuesday/

19.04.2010

Sofia

Signed: President of Bulgarian Chess Federation and member of the Organizing Committee for the match Dr. Stefan Sergiev

End of official text. Note: statement published without changes. Here is a timeline of the events which led to tension in the afternoon of April 18th.

Garvinator
19-04-2010, 10:55 PM
I want to change my poll vote!!!!!!!!!!!

Adamski
19-04-2010, 11:05 PM
I want to change my poll vote!!!!!!!!!!!Me too. This match is not going to happen soon.

Garvinator
19-04-2010, 11:09 PM
Me too. This match is not going to happen soon.
I just want to see if Anand likes the toilet arrangement ;)

Kevin Bonham
19-04-2010, 11:42 PM
In anticipation of smart-aleck voting following the news I changed "deferred" to "greatly deferred" in the final poll option. I will define "greatly deferred" as meaning that the match is postponed until after its current scheduled finishing date.

From what the BCF say in the quoted press release above I don't have great concerns yet. If Vishy is in Sofia by the 21st, which he may well be, he can attend the opening ceremony even if he just stepped off a train that day; it will not affect him. If he isn't there they can have it without him if they must although it will not be as successful.

The key issue is willingness to postpone the start of play and they state they are discussing that. So long as there is willingness there, that is no problem. [EDIT: I now see they were only thinking of a one-day postponement.]

I do just hold my breath when this sort of thing comes up because of the risk that we could see some very silly politics.

The strange thing is that the letter is worded as a "no" response when it is actually more of a "probably, but ..."

Oepty
20-04-2010, 12:18 AM
Driving has to be an option to get from Frankfurt to Sofia. Hiring a car might be difficult but surely he knows chess people who could help out.
I have started following cycling and the flight ban had an impact of the Amstel Gold Race (a very big 1 day race) in the Netherlands being held on Sunday. A number of riders were unable to make it to the race, but others jumped into cars, or team buses and drove from as far away as Italy and Spain to get to the race. Some did not arrive until the evening before. Anand should follow suit, jump in a car and get there.
Scott

Kevin Bonham
20-04-2010, 12:32 AM
John Cleese got around it by taking a $5,500 equivalent taxi ride to get from Oslo to Brussels (1550 km by road).

Frankfurt to Sofia is probably somewhat further than that, but not hugely so.

Kevin Bonham
20-04-2010, 12:45 AM
TWIC has little sympathy (http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/world-chess-championship-2010/anand-told-to-get-to-sofia-by-wednesday) :


Anand's concerns will no doubt be tiredness due to travel and disruption of his preparation and settling in time. However the start of the match is still four days away (and it was 8 days when he first found out about the problem) and obviously he should be able to get there in that time. If he was to arrive in Sofia tonight it is difficult to see that it will make all that much difference. All his technical opening preparation should be finished, perhaps he intended some warm up games and a settling in period.

ER
20-04-2010, 01:15 AM
John Cleese got around it by taking a $5,500 equivalent taxi ride to get from Oslo to Brussels (1550 km by road).

Frankfurt to Sofia is probably somewhat further than that, but not hugely so.


It's 1257.52 kms

http://www.mapcrow.info/Distance_between_Frankfurt_GM_and_Sofia_BU.html

or 1390.18 Kms

http://www.distance-calculator.co.uk/distance-from-sofia-to-frankfurt/walldorf.htm

Lol in Europe distances are ... flexible and variable! so many different ways to go from one place to another! :P

Kevin Bonham
20-04-2010, 02:11 AM
The second site gave a much lower distance estimate for Oslo-Brussels than Cleese's journey so I'm guessing those are linear and by air or something like that.

Kevin Bonham
20-04-2010, 02:29 AM
Another Bulgarian Chess Federation letter:

http://letters.chessdom.com/bcf-statement-anand-topalov

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
20-04-2010, 06:14 AM
ive just acquired "vishy anand : my best games of chess", so im just going to guess ..... anand by a couple.

topalov obviously cant win because there is a picture of him on a horse featured in "new in chess" issue 6 from 2007. i vaguely get the feeling that he isnt entirely comfortable on the animal so i think he should lose this match due to historically sub-par equine interactions....................;) ;)

Oepty
20-04-2010, 07:43 AM
John Cleese got around it by taking a $5,500 equivalent taxi ride to get from Oslo to Brussels (1550 km by road).

Frankfurt to Sofia is probably somewhat further than that, but not hugely so.

About 1730 kms according to google maps. In bad news for Anand and others trying to travel, according to ABC radio news, it appears that the volcano's eruption is increasing again and there is a new cloud heading for Europe. This might go on for a long time.
Scott

Skulte
20-04-2010, 08:35 AM
There just can't be a world championship match with no drama can there...

Garvinator
20-04-2010, 11:40 AM
There just can't be a world championship match with no drama can there...Except for the last match- Anand v Kramnik or Kramnik v Leko.

Kevin Bonham
20-04-2010, 10:47 PM
Anand has reached Sofia as of early this morning local time. He is still requesting a three-day delay to the start of play.

Garvinator
20-04-2010, 10:48 PM
http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/04/anand-just-arrived-in-sofia.html


Breaking news, Anand is in Sofia for the World Championship
Opening ceremony, inspections, and events before the Anand - Topalov match LIVE!

14:30 CET: Close source to Chessdom.com confirmed that Viswanathan Anand has arrived in Sofia. This happened early in the morning. Anand was supposed to arrive today in this time frame, as confirmed in an interview with FIDE Deputy President Georgios Makropoulos. We are trying to get in touch with the organizing committee and Mr. Hans Walter Schmitt for another confirmation of the news.

For now we present you a long video interview with Anand was published on Al Jazeera.

Note: The article will be updated upon new details from Sofia.

The official opening ceremony of the match Anand - Topalov starts at 17:00 CET on Wednesday, April 21st.

The opening ceremony will be preceded by two important events. The organizers announced that at 10:00 CET on Wednesday there will be inspection of the playing hall, with the players and their teams. At 11:00 CET there will be a press conference with FIDE, the players, and the teams (photo of press conference room here). Some details of the opening ceremony are here.

The special curtain was tested and approved yesterday by both teams. It does not block the spectators point of view and has minor effect on the quality of photos and video. Chairs were tested and approved, but upon players request at tomorrow's inspection they can be changed. The Chief arbiter Panaqiotis Nikolopoulos inspected carefully all details in accordance to FIDE regulations.

The only visible concern coming from Anand's team was about the table of the match (photo here). It is the same one used during the Mtel Masters tournaments, but a more stable one was requested. The organizers will have the wish granted before tomorrows inspection.

Games start on April 23rd (if schedule remains unchanged).

ER
21-04-2010, 02:58 AM
http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/04/anand-just-arrived-in-sofia.html
Breaking news, Anand is in Sofia for the World Championship
Opening ceremony, inspections, and events before the Anand - Topalov match LIVE!


Meanwhile FIDE Deputy President Georgios Makropoulos has been discussing the prospect of a possible match delay ("Now, it is clear that we are facing a force majeure situation").
http://www.chessbase.com/

Amir K.
21-04-2010, 07:01 PM
Today Anand inspected the Tea and Coffea cups:owned: .

ER
21-04-2010, 07:08 PM
World Championship postponed – by one day
21.04.2010 – "I have consulted with all the parties to try and resolve the 'force majeure' situation," writes FIDE Deputy President Georgios Makropoulos.

http://chessbase.com/

Kevin Bonham
21-04-2010, 07:44 PM
Presumably this means all the games will be postponed one day but does anyone know this for sure?

ER
21-04-2010, 08:35 PM
Presumably this means all the games will be postponed one day but does anyone know this for sure?

In FIDE Deputy President and FIDE Supervisor for the World Championship Match Mr Makropoulos's letter to Prime Minister of Bulgaria Mr Boyko Borisov who is also the Chairman of Organising Committee of FIDE World Championship (I didn't know that the honorable PM was involved in that) there is reference to one (the first) game postponement only.
http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6270

Garvinator
21-04-2010, 11:34 PM
Schedule on main website is now saying April 24.

Kevin Bonham
21-04-2010, 11:54 PM
Yes and it is showing all games one day later, except for the last few days which are showing as two games later (I wonder if this is an error) :

April 24 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 1
April 25 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 2
April 26 – Rest Day
April 27 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 3
April 28 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 4
April 29 – Rest Day
April 30 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 5
May 1 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 6
May 2 – Rest Day
May 3 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 7
May 4 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 8
May 5 – Rest Day
May 6 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 9
May 7 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 10
May 8 – Rest Day
May 9 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 11
May 10 – Rest Day
May 12 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 12
May 13 – Rest Day
May 14 – Tie breaks

Garvinator
22-04-2010, 12:03 AM
Yes and it is showing all games one day later, except for the last few days which are showing as two games later (I wonder if this is an error) :

April 24 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 1
April 25 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 2
April 26 – Rest Day
April 27 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 3
April 28 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 4
April 29 – Rest Day
April 30 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 5
May 1 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 6
May 2 – Rest Day
May 3 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 7
May 4 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 8
May 5 – Rest Day
May 6 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 9
May 7 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 10
May 8 – Rest Day
May 9 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 11
May 10 – Rest Day
May 12 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 12
May 13 – Rest Day
May 14 – Tie breaks
May 11 no longer exists in the calendar ;)

Garvinator
22-04-2010, 12:04 AM
The main site for me is showing:

April 21 – 18.00 EEST (15.00 UTC) - Official opening
April 24 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 1
April 25 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 2
April 26 – Rest Day
April 27 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 3
April 28 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 4
April 29 – Rest Day
April 30 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 5
May 1 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 6
May 2 – Rest Day
May 3 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 7
May 4 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 8
May 5 – Rest Day
May 6 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 9
May 7 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 10
May 8 – Rest Day
May 9 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 11
May 10 – Rest Day
May 11 – 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) - Game 12
May 12 – Rest Day
May 13 – Tie breaks

Kevin Bonham
22-04-2010, 12:12 AM
The dud copy I found was under "Regulations" at http://www.anand-topalov.com/en/regulations.html

I can now also see the one you found, but the Regulations one is still in error.

Garvinator
22-04-2010, 03:57 AM
http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/04/breaking-news-topalov-drew-white-in-1st.html

Topalov is white in game one. Get your votes in everyone, polls close soon.

Garvinator
23-04-2010, 09:50 PM
First game is to now start two hours later than previously scheduled.

Kevin Bonham
23-04-2010, 10:03 PM
First game is to now start two hours later than previously scheduled.

Yes:


The reason about that change is synchronization with the schedule of the Bulgarian Prime- minister Boyko Borisov who has to make the first symbolic move.

This change become necessary after the FIDE’s decision to postpone the match according to the request of the present world chess champion Viswanathan Anand.

:rolleyes: Isn't there any other dignitary they can get to stand in? It's far from ideal for those watching the match up late in other parts of the world.

Garvinator
23-04-2010, 10:36 PM
:rolleyes: Isn't there any other dignitary they can get to stand in? It's far from ideal for those watching the match up late in other parts of the world.I am really getting the impression that from the administrators perspective, the interests of all the non-players are more important than the 12 games themselves and that they want to use every available opportunity to hog the limelight, rather than being concerned about putting on a good event.

Jesper Norgaard
24-04-2010, 06:52 AM
I am really getting the impression that from the administrators perspective, the interests of all the non-players are more important than the 12 games themselves and that they want to use every available opportunity to hog the limelight, rather than being concerned about putting on a good event.
I see that Danailov wants to sue FIDE for the 1-day postponement. Is there really no decency in the man? Topalov has the worst PR-agent he could possibly get. Only a mal-wired Robocop killing kids that throw garbage in the park could possibly do worse :rolleyes:
Maybe Topa is like Korchnoi, only if something sinister is going on around him (like Soviet Union holding his family as hostage), he can play well. And if Anand behaves like an Angel, they will have to invent the trouble like the infamous Toiletgate incident.

soupman_2
24-04-2010, 07:35 AM
Is Hollywood scripting this championship? A nerve-tingling description of Anand's cross-continent dash:
http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6269

Anand, the gladiator, prepares calmly for the battle. Al Jazeera gets into the dressing room for an interview:
http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6267

siow, weng nian
24-04-2010, 03:51 PM
Dear All ChessChatters,

Slightly off-topic but connected to the "spectacle" that is the World Championship 2010 ......

GM Ian Rogers has written a decidedly Down-Under humoured introductory piece on the World Champs at USCF CLO: see here (http://main.uschess.org/content/view/10325/585). And there was this para:


Chessdom www.chessdom.com, the Balkan site which has consistently been breaking news about the match – albeit consistently with a pro-Topalov spin – has a team of mostly GM commentators but the style is often rather dry and you will already have seen most of the suggested ideas if you are running your own Fritz or Rybka engine in the background. (If you don’t have a chessplaying engine, ChessDom does the job for you with a clever innovation – using ChessBomb they provide computer assessments of the positions for all to see.)

However, it seemed Chessdom objected and teh para was temporarily "censored" but is now back online. Here is CLO's explanation:


Editor's Note 4.23.10- the following paragraph was temporarily deleted last night--chessdom.com disputes GM Rogers' summary below. Chessdom objections to the paragraph below include,1.the site is not Balkan but international, 2.the analysis features world-class players and is not reliant on engine analysis and 3. they are objective reporters of the match, not pro-Topalov. CLO encourages readers to visit chessdom.com to form their own opinion.

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2010, 04:31 PM
Excellent and very entertaining article. I'll be giving the banitzas a wide berth.

Although the time conversions at the end are given for "AEST", as far as I can tell they are actually for the US time zones AST or EDT. AEST is an Australian time zone and the conversions for it are:

Round 1 17.00 EEST (14.00 UTC) = midnight AEST as we are UTC+10
Round 2 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) = 10pm AEST.

Chessdom should get over themselves and the paragraph should not have been removed in the first place; it is not actionable and Rogers is entitled to express his opinion. A similar example of silliness: Danailov has threatened to sue FIDE over the one-day delay. For what and under what law is completely unclear; it seems that he just has to be a drama queen. I liked the joke I saw on another forum that watching LOTR DVDs on the way across Europe will prepare Anand for his upcoming battle with Sauron and Gollum. :lol:

Whiggi
24-04-2010, 04:34 PM
is it possible to place a bet per match? Im not all to sure about these gambling sites dont know where to go :)
i wanna put 10 bucks on that Top will win the first match :owned:
just to keep an already interesting sport more interesting

Garvinator
24-04-2010, 04:49 PM
is it possible to place a bet per match? Im not all to sure about these gambling sites dont know where to go :)
Betfair is only offering match odds, not individual game odds.

Anand $1.89
Topalov $2.00

Most interesting thing to me, it is in the sports section :)

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2010, 05:07 PM
Yes I have seen a few sites offering match odds (all with Anand as a slight favourite and Topalov closing) but I have not seen any offering odds game by game.

Tony Dowden
24-04-2010, 08:34 PM
The speed of updating of news on Chessbase has been unimpressive in recent years. They are often a whole day out of date on major event news, sometimes two. Used to be better than that.
I think Chessbase are more interested in quality than speed. Admittedly ChessVibes does both though.

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2010, 11:04 PM
My nomination for the silliest mainstream article about the match so far:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/chess/7624286/Chess-players-get-silent-treatment-in-1.7m-tournament.html

Author should have run it past someone with a clue.

Bereaved
24-04-2010, 11:55 PM
My nomination for the silliest mainstream article about the match so far:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/chess/7624286/Chess-players-get-silent-treatment-in-1.7m-tournament.html

Author should have run it past someone with a clue.


Especially needed is the sacking of the sub editor who allowed this horrific gaffe to pass unnoticed:


The prospect of a silent world championship has caused a stir in golf's usual placid waters.

This is funny as:wall: :wall:

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Garvinator
25-04-2010, 12:10 AM
Here's a shocker. Main website will not load. How predictable!!! :wall: :wall: :wall:

Ok now in.

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 02:37 AM
Game 1. Extremely onesided and it looks like Anand was outprepared. Topalov used only 39 minutes for the game.

Topalov - Anand

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.0-0 Na5 11.Bd3 b6 12.Qd2 e5 13.Bh6 cxd4 14.Bxg7 Kxg7 15.cxd4 exd4 16.Rac1 Qd6 17.f4 f6 18.f5 Qe5 19.Nf4 g5 20.Nh5+ Kg8 21.h4 h6 22.hxg5 hxg5 23.Rf3 Kf7? Attempting to ward off the sacrifice but makes it stronger. 24.Nxf6! Kxf6 25.Rh3 Rg8 26.Rh6+ Kf7 27.Rh7+ Ke8 28.Rcc7 Kd8 29.Bb5! Qxe4 30.Rxc8+ and if those last two moves are correct then black resigned here presumably because the endgame is hopeless after 30...Kxc8 31.Qc1+ Nc6 32.Bxc6 Qe3+ 33.Qxe3 dxe3 34.Bxa8 1-0

There will doubtless be a lot of analysis of whether 23...Bb7 or 23...Bd7 are sufficient to repel the sac and if so how accurate black has to be in that line.

Maybe Vishy should have spent the car journey doing prep on a laptop or something instead of watching LOTR!

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 03:21 AM
TWIC suggests Anand mixed up move orders in remembering his preparation.

Jesper Norgaard
25-04-2010, 08:32 AM
I predict no more Grünfeld games in this match! At least not before the possible rapid games, should Anand recover from this blow to a 6-6 score. I wonder why Kasparov did not change from Ruy Lopez when he obviously was not getting anywhere against Kramnik's Berlin Wall, which there was no time to study thoroughly in the middle of that match. Scotch would have been a splendid candidate against 1.e4,e5. Likewise, I think Anand will go down badly if he continues Grünfeld which is not his main defense(s) to 1.d4. If Topalov is the dynamic and explosive player, and Anand is the steady and strategic player of the two, this is the wrong opening to pick. If this were a match against Karpov it would have been fine for Anand to choose Grünfeld.

I don't know why Anand would like to defend a position with Kf7-e7 as he did, and if so why didn't he play Kf7 directly instead of Kg8 and then Kf7. Still with this loss of tempi he played Kxf6? when computers give Qxf6 as a better defense, although the position might already be lost.

A quick Bd7 and Rac8 would have done a lot to neutralize the effect of the piece sacrifice. Anand looked pretty clueless in this game. Did he still have ashes in the eyes? :(

Carl Gorka
25-04-2010, 09:54 AM
I went to bed shortly after Topalov played Rf3:lol:

Kamsky had come on to ICC claiming the position had been been part of his home analysis for his match against Topalov and that Black should hold without trouble.

Oh well....:doh:

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 03:11 PM
Thought I'd have a look at how often the incumbent champion has lost the first game of a WC match.

This has happened ten nine times:

Steinitz 1889 lost game 1 to Chigorin
Steinitz 1892 lost game 1 to Chigorin
Steinitz 1894 lost game 1 to Lasker
Capablanca 1927 lost game 1 to Alekhine
Euwe 1937 lost game 1 to Alekhine [no; see #73]
Botvinnik 1957 lost game 1 to Smyslov
Smyslov 1958 lost game 1 to Botvinnik
Botvinnik 1960 lost game 1 to Tal
Tal 1961 lost game 1 to Botvinnik
Karpov 1985 lost game 1 to Kasparov

Steinitz recovered to win both matches against Chigorin. Every other defending champion who lost game 1 went on to lose the match even though all those matches were longer than this one. History is not on Anand's side here.

Muzzy
25-04-2010, 06:17 PM
Nice stats. Cheers!

Lets see if Vishy can recover...

soupman_2
25-04-2010, 06:21 PM
Partial transcript of Riz Khan's interview of Vishy Anand for Al Jazeera TV.
Source: http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=6267

Part 1 (From 4:04 min)

RK: In terms of the way again the psychology is, how do you prepare for a tournament? How do you get yourself into the right frame of mind, so that you're not psyched out by someone else?

VA: Well you first draw up a list of all the other participants. And then make a list of, a database of all their games. And then start going through that. Look at all the recent games. In chess, it's a big advantage if you can guess what your opponent is going to do in the first few moves. He is trying to surprise you, but if you guess correctly that's a fairly big advantage to have, because it allows you to prepare very elaborate strategies against that. So what we do is we try to put ourselves in each other's heads and guess where the other person is going. But, of course, they're trying to do the same and it's a bit unpredictable. But when you get it right, it works very well.

RK: When you're preparing for obviously the World Championship do you have to literally study your opponent? I mean study their moves and see if there is any recurring patterns and so on?

VA: Yes exactly. I mean you literally take every game they played as a child and try to break down every pattern you can find, that you can make sense of. You also see all the recent trends. Who is your opponent being influenced by? Perhaps he has a friend who has suggested something. You try to dissect every little bit of information you can glean from a game. But then you also have to do a lot of work on the openings and what you're going to do; because just because your opponent has a weakness doesn't mean you can take advantage of it. So it's a bit of that. You also have to guess what he's trying to do about you. It's a lot of guesswork. So you can do a lot of work for a match and have it completely wasted or have a bullseye. And that's the key really.
.................................................. ......................

Part 2

(From 10 sec)
RK: Tell me about that winning moment, becoming World Champion, the lead up to it and your state of mind.

VA: I became World Champion for the first time in 2000 but at that point the title was still disputed. And what made it even worse, I lost it within a year. So I didn't retain my title in 2001. That was a big blow for me. And then for a long time, because there was a bit of chaos in the chess world, there wasn't actually a Championship I could take part in. But finally in 2006, the title got reunified.

And in 2007 in Mexico City, I had a chance to fight for the title. I think the very fact that I had waited so long, six years, made me really sort of want it. I mean, it sounds self-evident that you want to become world champion, but you can't control your brain and this time I could really feel that everything in me, you know, wanted to do it.

It helped that Mexico went incredibly smoothly. I mean the individual games were tough, but at least I could always be consoled by the fact that (with) my score I was leading in the tournament, and so on. Still I had an enormous scare in the 13th game, right before the last lap, because it looked like the thing was a done deal then, but had I lost this game, you know, the last one would have been a lottery. Still I probably had the best odds, or the most tickets, but it would have been really tough. So when I drew that 13th game - fairly lost position, but I managed to save it with some defence - and then I could really sit and enjoy myself. And that was really special because (for) the first time I had become the unified World Champion; but also having not had it for six years, that was very special.

Then last year (2008) I had to defend the title in Bonn against Kramnik. And I would say again, (I had) pretty much the same emotions: retaining the title; doing it in match format, which I hadn't done before - so that completes, you know, all the formats; and knowing, that again, I didn't lose the title within a year. That was really special for me.

(From 6:30 min)
RK: How does a chess player change in terms of their ability in going from young to older chess players? Is there a visible change in the way they work, not just with the experience they have, but in the way their thought process goes and in the way they are able to handle tournaments?

VA: Yeh, I think chess has a lot of rooms, so to speak. And as you discover more and more rooms you become a bit more open to the idea that you could be wrong. I think that when you are young you have a very strong sense of right and wrong in chess. These are good moves, these are crap moves, and that sort of thing. But as you gain more experience, you gain more flexibility in many positions. I think that's what a healthy player should be doing. As you get older you should be growing as a chess player and doing lots of new things. Also trends in chess change very fast and if you don't ride every wave, so to speak, what worked very well for a while, people might learn from that and adapt to it. You also have to keep moving on.

RK: Yes when you say "trends". How do you mean? The playing styles?

VA: Playing styles (nodding). I mean a certain approach, a certain opening may work for a while, and if you sort of put all your bets on that and don't work on other areas, when people solve that, suddenly you won't have a weapon with which you can cope. Chess is very, very broad and you need to keep on playing different kinds of positions to get a better intuition. Intuition is simply in chess you have a certain feeling: this piece belongs here, I can't explain why, but it just feels right here. Or this move is right here, and so on. And that's very useful in all sorts of crunch moments. So I think as you grow as a chess player, it helps you with your tournament career as well.

RK: Who's the most interesting player, or, perhaps, the most challenging player, but certainly the most interesting player, you have come across?

VA: Well definitely Kasparov is very, very interesting. And simply for many, many years. I would say that a lot of chess players are very interesting. In a given year they may suddenly show something which makes you question your understanding of chess. And you think, "Wow! I can really learn from these guys". But for many years this was him and he was very consistent for many years.

RK: Did you get to play him as well? You've had a chance to play all the big names from the past?

VA: Oh definitely. I mean, I've played Karpov and Kasparov over a hundred games each. So a huge number of times.

.................................................. .........................

Jesper Norgaard
25-04-2010, 06:30 PM
Thought I'd have a look at how often the incumbent champion has lost the first game of a WC match.

Fischer lost the first game to Spasskij with the infamous 27...Bxh2?! but went on to win the match. He might not have been the champion on paper, but with 2785 in rating against 2560 by Spasskij, had a 225 points advantage :)

Have you looked at challenger losing first game and still winning? It should be a similar situation, after all Anand is not on his home turf :)

Bill Gletsos
25-04-2010, 07:49 PM
Fischer lost the first game to Spasskij with the infamous 27...Bxh2?! but went on to win the match. He might not have been the champion on paper, but with 2785 in rating against 2560 by Spasskij, had a 225 points advantage :)Spassky was 2660 not 2560, so the difference was 125 points.

Vlad
25-04-2010, 08:52 PM
Spassky was 2660 not 2560, so the difference was 125 points.

That is how myths originate...:rolleyes:

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 08:53 PM
Have you looked at challenger losing first game and still winning? It should be a similar situation, after all Anand is not on his home turf :)

This has happened 14 times (including the three of debated classification at the bottom) and the challenger has gone on to win the match four times and tie it twice. A pretty good record really given that many of the challengers who lost game 1 were just uncompetitive.

Steinitz 1897 lost game 1 and lost
Marshall 1907 lost game 1 and lost
Tarrasch 1908 lost game 1 and lost
Janowski 1910 lost game 1 and lost
Bogoljubov 1929 lost game 1 and lost
Euwe 1935 lost game 1 but won
Smyslov 1954 lost game 1 and drew the match but the champion retained the title
Petrosian 1963 lost game 1 but won
Spassky 1969 lost game 1 but won
Fischer 1972 lost game 1 but won
Korchnoi 1981 lost game 1 and lost
---------------------------------
Short 1993 lost game 1 and lost
Leko 2004 lost game 1 and drew the match but the champion retained the title
Topalov 2006 lost game 1 and drew the match but lost the tiebreak

soupman_2
25-04-2010, 09:45 PM
good photos of the venue

http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/world-championship-g1/#more-24507

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 10:35 PM
Comparison game for the current one:

Gulko - Shulman 2008

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 a6 6.Ne5 c5 7.Na3 cxd4 8.Naxc4 Bc5 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bd2 Nd5 11.Rc1 Nd7 12.Nd3 Ba7 13.Ba5 Qe7 14.Qb3 Rb8 15.Nce5 Nxe5 16.Nxe5 Qf6 17.Nd3 b6 18.Bb4 Rd8 19.Bxd5 Rxd5 20.Rc7 Bb7 21.Be7 Qf5 22.Qc2 e5 23.Rc1 h6 24.Nb4 d3 25.exd3? Rd7 26.Rxb7 Rbxb7 27.Qc8+ Kh7 28.Nxa6 Qxd3 29.Nb4 Qd2 30.Bf8 Rb8 0-1

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2010, 11:26 PM
I think that should be Gulko - Shulman from the 2008 US championship.

Correct, and corrected. Probably not the first time I've mixed up the two American Sh-s.

Capablanca-Fan
26-04-2010, 12:01 AM
Thought I'd have a look at how often the incumbent champion has lost the first game of a WC match.

This has happened ten times:

Steinitz 1889 lost game 1 to Chigorin
Steinitz 1892 lost game 1 to Chigorin
Steinitz 1894 lost game 1 to Lasker
Capablanca 1927 lost game 1 to Alekhine
Euwe 1937 lost game 1 to Alekhine
This is not correct (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=54136). Euwe won the first, yet Alekhine was not perturbed, saying, "So, the first game has gone against me ..." It was not till Game 7 that Euwe fell behind, and he collapsed after Game 21, losing 4.5/5.


Steinitz recovered to win both matches against Chigorin. Every other defending champion who lost game 1 went on to lose the match even though all those matches were longer than this one. History is not on Anand's side here.
I am not sure whether this is relevant though. Some challengers have dethroned champions despite losing the first game, e.g. Alekhine against Euwe above, Spassky v Petroyan 1969, Fischer v Spassky 1972. Petrosyan said he would never forgive himself for winning the first game, and with Black, although as your stats show, this was a strange comment.

Kevin Bonham
26-04-2010, 12:06 AM
This is not correct (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=54136).

Indeed not, clerical mixup on my part; fixed.

Kevin Bonham
26-04-2010, 02:01 AM
Game two. Topalov found himself defending a very cramped position a pawn up and for a while seemed to be doing an OK job of it. But he lost the plot in the middlegame especially with 25...Ne3? (27.Rxb6 Rxd3 is interesting for black but 27.Bf3! as played just leaves black struggling) and for most of the latter half of the game pretty much every Topalov move was either forced or questionable!

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 a6 6.Ne5 c5 7.Na3 cxd4 8.Naxc4 Bc5 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bd2 Nd5 11.Rc1 Nd7 12.Nd3 Ba7 13.Ba5 Qe7 14.Qb3 Rb8 15.Qa3 Qxa3 16.bxa3 N7f6 17.Nce5 Re8 18.Rc2 b6 19.Bd2 Bb7 20.Rfc1 Rbd8 21.f4 Bb8 22.a4 a5 23.Nc6 Bxc6 24.Rxc6 h5 25.R1c4 Ne3 26.Bxe3 dxe3 27.Bf3 g6 28.Rxb6 Ba7 29.Rb3 Rd4 30.Rc7 Bb8 31.Rc5 Bd6 32.Rxa5 Rc8 33.Kg2 Rc2 34.a3 Ra2 35.Nb4 Bxb4 36.axb4 Nd5 37.b5 Raxa4 38.Rxa4 Rxa4 39.Bxd5 exd5 40.b6 Ra8 41.b7 Rb8 42.Kf3 d4 43.Ke4 1-0

soupman_2
26-04-2010, 10:39 AM
immediate, simple analyses of the WCC games
http://www.youtube.com/user/jrobichess

Denis_Jessop
26-04-2010, 05:45 PM
Especially needed is the sacking of the sub editor who allowed this horrific gaffe to pass unnoticed:
Quote:
Originally Posted by incompetent journalist/sub editor
The prospect of a silent world championship has caused a stir in golf's usual placid waters.

Correct. The waters on a golf course are rarely placid. Either they have ducks making ripples on them or, more often, they are disturbed by golf balls.

DJ

Carl Gorka
26-04-2010, 11:54 PM
I went to bed shortly after Topalov played Rf3:lol:

Kamsky had come on to ICC claiming the position had been been part of his home analysis for his match against Topalov and that Black should hold without trouble.

Oh well....:doh:

Game 2 looked fairly level when I went to bed....not long before Topalov played ..Ne3.

Looks like a theme developing here:doh: .....tomorrow night I'll go to bed before the game starts:P

pax
27-04-2010, 01:41 AM
My nomination for the silliest mainstream article about the match so far:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/chess/7624286/Chess-players-get-silent-treatment-in-1.7m-tournament.html

Author should have run it past someone with a clue.

Does anyone know what the article is supposed to be referring to? I read it in the West Australian today and was very confused.

Jesper Norgaard
27-04-2010, 09:42 AM
Does anyone know what the article is supposed to be referring to? I read it in the West Australian today and was very confused.
Anyone who can write this "The prospect of a silent world [chess] championship has caused a stir in golf's usual placid waters" ... is clearly beyond pedagogical reach. Still I think the origin was that the organizers would like to impose the Sofia rule on the match, now that it was actually played in Sofia, and the Anand team refused, probably because it is a little bit silly in a match, Topalov can just impose it on himself and it will have the same effect. Then Team Topalov got angry and Danailov issued a statement that Topalov would not speak to Anand and not accept any draws - and both players have kept promise until now, no draws in the first 2 games and no draw offers either!

I look forward to a string of 12 decisive games in the Sofia spirit! :owned:

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2010, 02:05 PM
Yes, as Jesper says it is all a beat-up about Sofia rules and the Topalov camp's declaration that they will unilaterally impose them by refusing to offer or accept draws.

It is not known why the Anand camp refused the proposal but they may have been concerned about placing the question of whether a game is a technical draw in the hands of FIDE referees rather than in the hands of the players.


I look forward to a string of 12 decisive games in the Sofia spirit! :owned:

I look forward to the first really long drawn-out ending where Topalov is marginally worse but there is no real prospect of him losing, and Anand offers a draw. :lol:

Garvinator
27-04-2010, 02:20 PM
I look forward to the first really long drawn-out ending where Topalov is marginally worse but there is no real prospect of him losing, and Anand offers a draw. :lol:Or if Topalov only requires a draw to win the whole match.

Goughfather
27-04-2010, 02:39 PM
It will be interested to see what Anand will whip out tonight with the black pieces. Even if 23 ... Bxd7 (as opposed to 23 ... Kf7) is objectively holding, it seems like an awfully difficult position to play as black and a position that Topalov has extensively prepared for and is more than happy to play with as white.

Garvinator
27-04-2010, 07:21 PM
It will be interested to see what Anand will whip out tonight with the black pieces. Even if 23 ... Bxd7 (as opposed to 23 ... Kf7) is objectively holding, it seems like an awfully difficult position to play as black and a position that Topalov has extensively prepared for and is more than happy to play with as white.
I would be very surprised if Anand even plays a Grunfeld. If he does, he will vary early.

More likely to be a semi slav or something similar, looking for a nice quiet position as in Game 2.

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2010, 09:11 PM
I think Anand should realise from game 2 that he does not need to take risks with black. If he can draw his five remaining black games then it's very very likely that at least one of the whites will take care of itself because of Topalov's temperament issues. Plus given Anand's records in rapids, the onus is probably on Topalov to get the match won in regulation.

Garvinator
27-04-2010, 10:10 PM
More likely to be a semi slav or something similar Yeah baby!!

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2010, 10:12 PM
Yes, a full Slav is probably closer to the mark than a semi if you're looking for a quiet position against Topalov!

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2010, 11:14 PM
Oh dear, I see we have the silly whinge about Chessbase violating the alleged prohibition on transmitting moves again.

Garvinator
27-04-2010, 11:34 PM
Oh dear, I see we have the silly whinge about Chessbase violating the alleged prohibition on transmitting moves again.I do think the organisers do have a legitimate case, or could at least have, but putting up notices like that and then doing nothing about it really is pointless.

In fact it could be counter-productive as it just gives further advertising that chessbase are transmitting the games live and you can use engines there.

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2010, 11:48 PM
I don't think they have a legitimate case unless Chessbase are stealing their video as well as relaying the moves. The moves are just a record of what occurred in the game and there is no copyright inherent in the moves themselves. They are not akin to a broadcast, commentary or annotation in which the filmers and/or commentators have intellectual property rights arising from the nature of their presentation of what is going on.

Kevin Bonham
28-04-2010, 01:59 AM
Game 3

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 e6 7.f3 c5 8.e4 Bg6 9.Be3 cxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nfd7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bxc4 a6 14.Rc1 Rg8 15.h4 h6 16.Ke2 Bd6 17.h5 Bh7 18.a5 Ke7 19.Na4 f6 20.b4 Rgc8 21.Bc5 Bxc5 22.bxc5 Rc7 23.Nb6 Rd8 24.Nxd7 Rdxd7 25.Bd3 Bg8 26.c6 Rd6 27.cxb7 Rxb7 28.Rc3 Bf7 29.Ke3 Be8 30.g4 e5 31.Rhc1 Bd7 32.Rc5 Bb5 33.Bxb5 axb5 34.Rb1 b4 35.Rb3 Ra6 36.Kd3 Rba7 37.Rxb4 Rxa5 38.Rxa5 Rxa5 39.Rb7+ Kf8 40.Ke2 Ra2+ 41.Ke3 Ra3+ 42.Kf2 Ra2+ 43.Ke3 Ra3+ 44.Kf2 Ra2+ 45.Ke3 Ra3+ 46.Kf2 ˝-˝

Seven completely pointless moves played in a dead drawn position at the end as a result of the home camp's Sofia rules nonsense. Apart from that this game may look prosaic but there were many interesting sacrificial sidelines that Anand wisely avoided! A good defensive performance by Anand.

Jesper Norgaard
28-04-2010, 08:41 AM
Seven completely pointless moves played in a dead drawn position at the end as a result of the home camp's Sofia rules nonsense.

Also they forgot to shake hands after the game, and Anand jokingly asked during the press conference if that should be through the arbiter too (referring to the draw offer vs. the hand shake), imagine Anand shaking hands with the arbiter who then shakes hands with Topalov :wall:

I kind of like the "modified Sofia rule" where you can't agree to a draw until move 20 or 25, but after move 25 it just becomes cumbersome and downright silly like in this game, if you can't offer a draw. So the match rules allows Anand to offer a draw even though Topalov won't, but as a true gentleman, after all this bahoola from the Danailov camp, Anand just plays on without offering a draw until Topalov figures out how to arrange the draw.

Not exactly a splendid way to promote the Sofia rule IMHO.

ER
28-04-2010, 01:59 PM
The "commentary" level of certain chatters in two sites' chatboxes that I am following is just so lame and disgusting. (Kevin noticed it too last night). Apart from only a few people who are actually interested in the match, covered live by those sites, making some valid comments, the rest of the participants are just contributing to a very impressive Morons International. If nothing else, I was expecting a bit of respect to the players and commentators which include ladies too!

Kevin Bonham
28-04-2010, 02:20 PM
It's a shame on the Rybka site because what they have is a very nice-looking board and nice quick service and they have to spoil it by allowing racists and other losers free reign to turn the chatbox into an open political sewer. Their chatbox should have a moderator on active duty at all times and many of the chatters there last night deserved immediate banning.

peter_parr
28-04-2010, 03:26 PM
The Sydney Morning Herald is covering the world title match with extra chess columns.

SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2010.htm)

I have organised extra chess columns in the SMH for over 37 years to cover important chess events.

Quality newspapers worldwide do the same and helps develop chess in the wider community.

World title matches should attract increased chess club membership (only about 1% of chess players actually go to a chess club).

If you read a chess column and are pleased send a letter to the editor.

If your newspaper is not covering the match why not ask them by email

ER
28-04-2010, 03:35 PM
The Sydney Morning Herald is covering the world title match with extra chess columns.

SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2010.htm)

I have organised extra chess columns in the SMH for over 37 years to cover important chess events.

Quality newspapers worldwide do the same and helps develop chess in the wider community.

World title matches should attract increased chess club membership (only about 1% of chess players actually go to a chess club).

If you read a chess column and are pleased send a letter to the editor.

If your newspaper is not covering the match why not ask them by email

Excellent work Peter and thanks! I think another good move would be to provide the SMH editor's e-mail address! :)

CameronD
28-04-2010, 07:02 PM
Apparently the players asked the arbiter permission for the draw who then looked to see if its dead.

The arbiter shouldve said its the players responsibility to agree to a draw unless a player is claiming one under the laws.

A real shame that the officials and arbiter are now dragged into this sofia rules debarkle. The arbiter should say hes having none of the sofia rubbish as it doesnt apply to this match.

Kevin Bonham
28-04-2010, 07:29 PM
Apparently the players asked the arbiter permission for the draw who then looked to see if its dead.

I'd be interested to see more about this - where did you see that?

CameronD
28-04-2010, 07:35 PM
I'd be interested to see more about this - where did you see that?

It was said on the game of the day analysis of the game on ICC which is available around 12 hours after the game. They go through the game in detail over 30-60 minutes with analysis and other lines avoided etc.

Kevin Bonham
28-04-2010, 09:00 PM
http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/wch-g3-easy-draw-for-kramnikian-anand/#more-24592

Chessvibes video with press conference and discussion about what happened at the end, the non-handshake etc.

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2010, 01:49 AM
Game 4. Anand-Topalov

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 a5 7.Qc2 Bxd2+ 8.Qxd2 c6 9.a4 b5 10.Na3 Bd7 11.Ne5 Nd5 12.e4 Nb4 13.0-0 0-0 14.Rfd1 Be8 15.d5 Qd6 16.Ng4 Qc5 17.Ne3 N8a6 18.dxc6 bxa4 19.Naxc4 Bxc6 20.Rac1 h6 21.Nd6 Qa7 22.Ng4 Rad8 23.Nxh6+ gxh6 24.Qxh6 f6 25.e5 Bxg2 26.exf6 Rxd6 27.Rxd6 Be4 28.Rxe6 Nd3 29.Rc2 Qh7 30.f7+ Qxf7 31.Rxe4 Qf5 32.Re7 1-0

Goughfather
29-04-2010, 02:01 AM
http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/wch-g3-easy-draw-for-kramnikian-anand/#more-24592

Chessvibes video with press conference and discussion about what happened at the end, the non-handshake etc.

Asked by none other than our very own Ian Rogers, it would seem.

I'd be inclined to accept Topalov's explanation that they just forgot in the unusual circumstances that accompanied the draw offer through the arbiter.

I wonder what other people think of Vishy's rhetorical question about shaking hands through the arbiter though. Throwaway line made in jest, or more pointed than meets the eye?

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2010, 02:12 AM
Asked by none other than our very own Ian Rogers, it would seem.

Yes, I thought that was Ian's voice too.


I'd be inclined to accept Topalov's explanation that they just forgot in the unusual circumstances that accompanied the draw offer through the arbiter.

Ditto here. It was clearly inadvertent and they were fine today. Susan Polgar's blog was funny, she had a really big spray at all the commenters on her site who were saying it was deliberate.


I wonder what other people think of Vishy's rhetorical question about shaking hands through the arbiter though. Throwaway line made in jest, or more pointed than meets the eye?

Probably a degree of bemused frustration being let out there. Can't blame him for that one. :lol:

Garrett
29-04-2010, 07:25 AM
I loved the speed with which Anand sacced his knight.

I think that takes some courage in a 12 (9 really) game World Championship.

cheers
Garrett.

Skulte
29-04-2010, 09:31 AM
Gotta love the chessbase report by Anish Giri that gets right to the point "Black has stupid knights" http://www.chessbase.com/news/2010/sofia/games/giri04.htm

Carl Gorka
29-04-2010, 11:02 AM
Game 2 looked fairly level when I went to bed....not long before Topalov played ..Ne3.

Looks like a theme developing here:doh: .....tomorrow night I'll go to bed before the game starts:P

Last night, the last move I saw was Anand's Nd6 just before things got really interesting....this is getting very frustrating:rolleyes:

I'll use the shoutbox from now on to say when I'm going to bed, and everyone can take that as a good time to start watching the games.

Garrett
29-04-2010, 11:13 AM
Last night, the last move I saw was Anand's Nd6 just before things got really interesting....this is getting very frustrating:rolleyes:

I'll use the shoutbox from now on to say when I'm going to bed, and everyone can take that as a good time to start watching the games.

yeah that's disappointing !

Last night I nodded off around 8pm and got up at 11 to watch the game then another couple of hours sleep after it finished.

Seems to work okay ...

Carl Gorka
29-04-2010, 11:15 AM
yeah that's disappointing !

Last night I nodded off around 8pm and got up at 11 to watch the game then another couple of hours sleep after it finished.

Seems to work okay ...

Would be good except I have early starts.

Igor_Goldenberg
29-04-2010, 02:01 PM
My impression from the match so far:
Topalov is better prepared, but Anand plays better chess.

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2010, 03:13 PM
I loved the speed with which Anand sacced his knight.

I saw a comment somewhere that top-class players will frequently play such sacrifices intuitively provided they are certain that if the sac does not work they can still force a draw.

It was interesting in that light that Anand spent much more time finding 25.e5, which clearly wins and is apparently the only move that does so, than he did playing the sac in the first place.

ER
29-04-2010, 05:07 PM
I am still trying to work out Topalov's finger placing around his head when he is thinking. I want to do it blindfold, (not looking at the position on video) Kev last clue; what is the geometrical (angular degrees) positioning of Topalov's hands in relation to his head?
I 've also discovered the usage of the facing down index. Under extreme pressure it can be used to scratch his ears or even his nose!

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2010, 05:14 PM
JaK's comment relates to a peculiar way Topalov holds his left hand next to his head that I noticed several times during the match last night, with the three outer fingers held straight and the index finger bent in the middle and pointing downwards at right angles or slightly more to the other three.

Say that there is a compass on the side of Topalov's head and north (zero) is the top of his head. Then his three outer fingers are pointing to about 30-40 degrees clockwise from north (the palm of his hand is held to his head so you see the outside of his hand only).

I think his thumb rests underneath the palm of his hand, which only makes it even more difficult for me to replicate without serious discomfort.

If absolutely necessary I will pause the vid next time he does it and get a screenshot.

ER
29-04-2010, 07:21 PM
with the three outer fingers held straight and the index finger bent in the middle and pointing downwards at right angles or slightly more to the other three.


That's impossible ( I tried it and I nearly broke my index finger)!!!:eek: :doh: Did you mean 180 degrees or thereabouts?

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2010, 10:19 PM
I've actually tried to replicate it by holding my hand up against my knee or a circle on a piece of paper but can't get anything that looks enough like it.

I think the guy must be double-jointed or something. The index finger bends at right angles at the lower joint, but the upper joint is more or less straight. I can't do that, I can bend mine at the lower joint but then the upper joint bends as well.

Kevin Bonham
01-05-2010, 12:41 AM
Actually I may have misinterpreted it. When Topalov sits on the right the light is clearer and on that side at least it appears that his index finger is bent right over at the first joint so you can only see half of it, and what looks like the rest of his index finger is actually his thumb coming in on an angle, thus making a circle with the bottom end of his index finger. This is all very important of course! :lol:

(I tried to replicate this and found it not much more comfortable than the other one!)

ER
01-05-2010, 12:50 AM
... and what looks like the rest of his index finger is actually his thumb coming in on an angle ...

Mistaken identity? :uhoh: but aren't thumbs usually fatter than indexes??? :hmm:

Kevin Bonham
01-05-2010, 12:54 AM
Mistaken identity? :uhoh: but aren't thumbs usually fatter than indexes??? :hmm:

Not when viewed from side-on apparently.

Kevin Bonham
01-05-2010, 02:55 AM
Game 5

Anand-Topalov

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 e6 7.f3 c5 8.e4 Bg6 9.Be3 cxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nfd7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bxc4 a6 14.Rc1 Rg8 15.h4 h5 16.Ne2 Bd6 17.Be3 Ne5 18.Nf4 Rc8 19.Bb3 Rxc1+ 20.Bxc1 Ke7 21.Ke2 Rc8 22.Bd2 f6 23.Nxg6+ Nxg6 24.g3 Ne5 25.f4 Nc6 26.Bc3 Bb4 27.Bxb4+ Nxb4 28.Rd1 Nc6 29.Rd2 g5 30.Kf2 g4 31.Rc2 Rd8 32.Ke3 Rd6 33.Rc5 Nb4 34.Rc7+ Kd8 35.Rc3 Ke7 36.e5 Rd7 37.exf6+ Kxf6 38.Ke2 Nc6 39.Ke1 Nd4 40.Bd1 a5 41.Rc5 Nf5 42.Rc3 Nd4 43.Rc5 Nf5 44.Rc3 draw

The key point seems to have been 22.Bd2?! f6! =

Apart from that the most interesting thing in the game was the move 17 power failure.

ER
01-05-2010, 12:05 PM
Apart from that the most interesting thing in the game was the move 17 power failure.
Was it a home prepared novelty? http://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Surprise/surprised-027.gif

Kevin Bonham
02-05-2010, 04:04 AM
Game 6

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 a6 6.Ne5 c5 7.Na3 cxd4 8.Naxc4 Bc5 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bg5 h6 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.Nd3 Ba7 13.Qa4 Nc6 14.Rac1 e5 15.Bxc6 b5 16.Qc2 Qxc6 17.Ncxe5 Qe4 18.Qc6 Bb7 19.Qxe4 Bxe4 20.Rc2 Rfe8 21.Rfc1 f6 22.Nd7 Bf5 23.N7c5 Bb6 24.Nb7 Bd7 25.Nf4 Rab8 26.Nd6 Re5 27.Nc8 Ba5 28.Nd3 Re8 29.Na7 Bb6 30.Nc6 Rb7 31.Ncb4 a5 32.Nd5 a4 33.Nxb6 Rxb6 34.Nc5 Bf5 35.Rd2 Rc6 36.b4 axb3 37.axb3 b4 38.Rxd4 Rxe2 39.Rxb4 Bh3 40.Rbc4 Rd6 41.Re4 Rb2 42.Ree1 Rdd2 43.Ne4 Rd4 44.Nc5 Rdd2 45.Ne4 Rd3 46.Rb1 Rdxb3 47.Nd2 Rb4 48.f3 g5 49.Rxb2 Rxb2 50.Rd1 Kf7 51.Kf2 h5 52.Ke3 Rc2 53.Ra1 Kg6 54.Ra6 Bf5 55.Rd6 Rc3+ 56.Kf2 Rc2 57.Ke3 Rc3+ 58.Kf2 Rc2 draw

The game included the most consecutive knight moves in world championship history!

Capablanca-Fan
02-05-2010, 06:08 AM
Game 6

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 a6 6.Ne5 c5 7.Na3 cxd4 8.Naxc4 Bc5 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bg5 h6 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.Nd3 Ba7 13.Qa4 Nc6 14.Rac1 e5 15.Bxc6 b5 16.Qc2 Qxc6 17.Ncxe5 Qe4 18.Qc6 Bb7 19.Qxe4 Bxe4 20.Rc2 Rfe8 21.Rfc1 f6 22.Nd7 Bf5 23.N7c5 Bb6 24.Nb7 Bd7 25.Nf4 Rab8 26.Nd6 Re5 27.Nc8 Ba5 28.Nd3 Re8 29.Na7 Bb6 30.Nc6 Rb7 31.Ncb4 a5 32.Nd5 a4 33.Nxb6 Rxb6 34.Nc5 Bf5 35.Rd2 Rc6 36.b4 axb3 37.axb3 b4 38.Rxd4 Rxe2 39.Rxb4 Bh3 40.Rbc4 Rd6 41.Re4 Rb2 42.Ree1 Rdd2 43.Ne4 Rd4 44.Nc5 Rdd2 45.Ne4 Rd3 46.Rb1 Rdxb3 47.Nd2 Rb4 48.f3 g5 49.Rxb2 Rxb2 50.Rd1 Kf7 51.Kf2 h5 52.Ke3 Rc2 53.Ra1 Kg6 54.Ra6 Bf5 55.Rd6 Rc3+ 56.Kf2 Rc2 57.Ke3 Rc3+ 58.Kf2 Rc2 draw

The game included the most consecutive knight moves in world championship history!
And once again, a number of unnecessary moves before the draw was agreed, because of the crass Sofia rule.

Adamski
02-05-2010, 08:28 AM
The game included the most consecutive knight moves in world championship history!

Clearly, that is consecutive moves by one player - White.

CameronD
02-05-2010, 09:13 AM
And once again, a number of unnecessary moves before the draw was agreed, because of the crass Sofia rule.

The Sofia rules are not in operation here. Nothing can be done if a player/s wish to continue playing.

Jesper Norgaard
02-05-2010, 01:18 PM
The Sofia rules are not in operation here. Nothing can be done if a player/s wish to continue playing.

But nothing could be done if a player/s wish to continue, even if Sofia rules were in effect! :hmm:
Sofia rules don't get to the draw settlement quicker, rather it is the other way round.

Kevin Bonham
04-05-2010, 02:52 AM
Game 7

Anand-Topalov

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 Bb4+ 5.Bd2 Be7 6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 c6 8.Bf4 dxc4 9.Ne5 b5 10.Nxc6 Nxc6 11.Bxc6 Bd7 12.Bxa8 Qxa8 13.f3 Nd5 14.Bd2 e5 15.e4 Bh3 16.exd5 Bxf1 17.Qxf1 exd4 18.a4 Qxd5 19.axb5 Qxb5 20.Rxa7 Re8 21.Kh1 Bf8 22.Rc7 d3 23.Bc3 Bd6 24.Ra7 h6 25.Nd2 Bb4 26.Ra1 Bxc3 27.bxc3 Re2 28.Rd1 Qa4 29.Ne4 Qc2 30.Rc1 Rxh2+ 31.Kg1 Rg2+ 32.Qxg2 Qxc1+ 33.Qf1 Qe3+ 34.Qf2 Qc1+ 35.Qf1 Qe3+ 36.Kg2 f5 37.Nf2 Kh7 38.Qb1 Qe6 39.Qb5 g5 40.g4 fxg4 41.fxg4 Kg6 42.Qb7 d2 43.Qb1+ Kg7 44.Kf1 Qe7 45.Kg2 Qe6 46.Qd1 Qe3 47.Qf3 Qe6 48.Qb7+ Kg6 49.Qb1+ Kg7 50.Qd1 Qe3 51.Qc2 Qe2 52.Qa4 Kg8 53.Qd7 Kf8 54.Qd5 Kg7 55.Kg3 Qe3+ 56.Qf3 Qe5+ 57.Kg2 Qe6 58.Qd1 ˝-˝

Topalov has done well to draw games 6 and 7 comfortably and now has three whites in the last five games to try to at least equalise the match.

Desmond
04-05-2010, 12:21 PM
Exciting game. Dunno how "comfortable" I would be with that position but I guess most of it was home-cooked.

Kevin Bonham
04-05-2010, 02:11 PM
Exciting game. Dunno how "comfortable" I would be with that position but I guess most of it was home-cooked.

First 20 moves were played in a few minutes and only after that did he start thinking (and perhaps immediately made a slight error with Bf8). Maybe there were chances for white in the ten moves after that; most of the endgame was pointless at their level.

Kevin Bonham
05-05-2010, 03:27 AM
Topalov - Anand.

It seems black's 22nd was an error but his position was already difficult. The OCB ending will doubtless be analysed for weeks, months, years to come but it appears that 54...Bc6?? loses and the question is whether black was already lost or whether it was a draw.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 e6 7.f3 c5 8.e4 Bg6 9.Be3 cxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nfd7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bxc4 Rc8 14.Bb5 a6 15.Bxd7+ Kxd7 16.Ke2 f6 17.Rhd1 Ke8 18.a5 Be7 19.Bb6 Rf8 20.Rac1 f5 21.e5 Bg5 22.Be3 f4 23.Ne4 Rxc1 24.Nd6+ Kd7 25.Bxc1 Kc6 26.Bd2 Be7 27.Rc1+ Kd7 28.Bc3 Bxd6 29.Rd1 Bf5 30.h4 g6 31.Rxd6+ Kc8 32.Bd2 Rd8 33.Bxf4 Rxd6 34.exd6 Kd7 35.Ke3 Bc2 36.Kd4 Ke8 37.Ke5 Kf7 38.Be3 Ba4 39.Kf4 Bb5 40.Bc5 Kf6 41.Bd4+ Kf7 42.Kg5 Bc6 43.Kh6 Kg8 44.h5 Be8 45.Kg5 Kf7 46.Kh6 Kg8 47.Bc5 gxh5 48.Kg5 Kg7 49.Bd4+ Kf7 50.Be5 h4 51.Kxh4 Kg6 52.Kg4 Bb5 53.Kf4 Kf7 54.Kg5 Bc6 55.Kh6 Kg8 56.g4 1-0

4-4 and Anand needs to be careful now.

Capablanca-Fan
05-05-2010, 07:12 AM
Topalov - Anand.

It seems black's 22nd was an error but his position was already difficult. The OCB ending will doubtless be analysed for weeks, months, years to come but it appears that 54...Bc6?? loses and the question is whether black was already lost or whether it was a draw.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 e6 7.f3 c5 8.e4 Bg6 9.Be3 cxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nfd7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bxc4 Rc8 14.Bb5 a6 15.Bxd7+ Kxd7 16.Ke2 f6 17.Rhd1 Ke8 18.a5 Be7 19.Bb6 Rf8 20.Rac1 f5 21.e5 Bg5 22.Be3 f4 23.Ne4 Rxc1 24.Nd6+ Kd7 25.Bxc1 Kc6 26.Bd2 Be7 27.Rc1+ Kd7 28.Bc3 Bxd6 29.Rd1 Bf5 30.h4 g6 31.Rxd6+ Kc8 32.Bd2 Rd8 33.Bxf4 Rxd6 34.exd6 Kd7 35.Ke3 Bc2 36.Kd4 Ke8 37.Ke5 Kf7 38.Be3 Ba4 39.Kf4 Bb5 40.Bc5 Kf6 41.Bd4+ Kf7 42.Kg5 Bc6 43.Kh6 Kg8 44.h5 Be8 45.Kg5 Kf7 46.Kh6 Kg8 47.Bc5 gxh5 48.Kg5 Kg7 49.Bd4+ Kf7 50.Be5 h4 51.Kxh4 Kg6 52.Kg4 Bb5 53.Kf4 Kf7 54.Kg5 Bc6 55.Kh6 Kg8 56.g4 1-0

4-4 and Anand needs to be careful now.
Compare the winning maneuvre in Euwe vs Yanofsky, Groningen 1946 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1042592). Toppy plays Bg7 then uses the g-pawn to clear a path for his K to f6 and penetrate. Not sure how Anand could have stopped this with an alternative to 54... Bc6.

Igor_Goldenberg
05-05-2010, 09:48 AM
Before 54...Bc6 it was a draw. Bishop needs to be able to protect h7 pawn, and king to hold d7 pawn. The easiest was to move king to d7 and bishop to d3.
The best white can achieve is to make f passed pawn, but with two pawns so close white cannot win (as long as black keep h pawn!)

Desmond
05-05-2010, 09:56 AM
Compare the winning maneuvre in Euwe vs Yanofsky, Groningen 1946 (Max Euwe vs Daniel Yanofsky Groningen 1946). Toppy plays Bg7 then uses the g-pawn to clear a path for his K to f6 and penetrate. Not sure how Anand could have stopped this with an alternative to 54... Bc6.
I'm not sure either. Maybe the idea is to switch the B to defending the h-pawn and bring the king around to d7. Whether that will hold long term, I don't know.

Garvinator
05-05-2010, 10:45 AM
So how would Topalov win from here? Here is the winning sequence: 56.g4 Bd7 57.g5 Be8 58.Bg7 Bd7 59.g6 hxg6 60.Kxg6 and Black is helpless to prevent White from penetrating. 60...Be8+ 61.Kf6 Bd7 62.Ke7 Bc6 63.d7 Bxd7 64.Kxd7 Kxg7 65.Kxe6. 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
05-05-2010, 10:56 AM
IM Goldenberg's and Boris' plan looks like it holds, thanx.

It seems a bit like the way, Yanofsky missed a draw against Euwe with 35... Kf5 and keeping the White K from getting past that long diagonal and penetrating.

Solo
05-05-2010, 12:52 PM
Hi Jono. I have to say I disagree, and the OCB was winning all through.:) I will annotate it when I get time.

Vlad
05-05-2010, 01:52 PM
Hi Jono. I have to say I disagree, and the OCB was winning all through.:) I will annotate it when I get time.

Well, if you are right then both GM Shipov and (more importantly) the former world champion Garry Kasparov are wrong. :lol:

Duff McKagan
05-05-2010, 05:13 PM
Hi Jono. I have to say I disagree, and the OCB was winning all through.:) I will annotate it when I get time.

I agree with Solo, but it would be interesting to see which plan he displays in his analysis, I think there are two tries to win it. Topalov obviously considered it winning also, because (according to commentators and computers) he dissipated a large advantage heading towards this ending. Nigel Short thought the ending was winning also. It was interesting that during the online broadcast smurfo was suggesting the idea of bishop to h6 to nail the h-pawn down then g4-g5, then walk in the white king to g7. That would be an aggressive try for sure.
A plan of restricting the Black Bishop firstly, then keeping the White King flexible to invade on either side of the board, is what I'd use.

In the game this didn't happen and Anand's Bc6?? move blew it for sure. Before the match started there are some Bulgarian rumours that the match is fixed. I guess we will find out as the match goes on.

Igor_Goldenberg
05-05-2010, 05:43 PM
Two questions:
1. How to win after 54...Ke8?
2. If white can't win after 54...Ke8, could it win earlier?

Kevin Bonham
05-05-2010, 05:52 PM
Before the match started there are some Bulgarian rumours that the match is fixed.

Did they say in what direction?

Duff McKagan
05-05-2010, 05:59 PM
Did they say in what direction?

No, however a lot of pundits took this to mean in Topalov's favour and put a lot of euros on him at something like 2:1 odds.


Two questions:
1. How to win after 54...Ke8?
2. If white can't win after 54...Ke8, could it win earlier?

1. I don't think White can win after 54...Ke8. It could be that 54...Bc6?? was blowing the game, or throwing the game. We shall see.
2. Try 35.Kd2 for starters

Kevin Bonham
05-05-2010, 06:19 PM
Rumours of match-fixing are probably inevitable in the current climate and worse still it is bound to be only a matter of time before actual match-fixing occurs in chess at a high level as it has in so many other sports on which betting occurs.

I just hope it all has no substance with regards to what has been quite an exciting match so far. I wouldn't read too much into it as, without generalising about everyone who lives there, Bulgaria historically has had a political culture that is prone to paranoia and corruption and this sometimes spills over into other things, such as the toilet claims from the Kramnik match.

CameronD
05-05-2010, 07:01 PM
Ive heard that the pawn sacs 35... e5 or 41... e5 may save the game as the king can come into the centre first.

Solo
05-05-2010, 07:23 PM
Two questions:
1. How to win after 54...Ke8?
2. If white can't win after 54...Ke8, could it win earlier?
After 54 ... Ke8 the winning plan seems clear: f4, g4, f5, ...exf5; gxf5,
Then W has K on g5, B on e5, Ps on d6 & f5. Bl's K on f7, B on d7, P on h7. Q-side Ps as they are. Then Bg3-h4, Kf4-e5, f6, and Kd4-c5-b6 wins. I can't see what Bl can do against this plan. If he pushes the h-Pawn to h5 or h6 I think he will lose it due to zugzwangs, if White even needs to win it.

Solo
05-05-2010, 07:27 PM
The endgame is fascinating and my favourite type, and to annotate it properly I will need a few hours and I might do it on the weekend. I think it was winning all through and Topalov made it harder for himself by playing h5 too early.

ER
05-05-2010, 07:33 PM
Was it Kev who said this OCB will be discussed for a long time? There you are! It shows how rich Chess is, discussions here are reflected to the highest level GMs who tend to disagree on possible outcomes!
Another point is that regardless of strength in rating terms, GMs, even World Champs are human.
In reaching my last night's (correct) prediction in regards to the final outcome, publicly stated in the Shoutbox, I only had to look at Vishy's body language. He looked defeated. So I went to bed! That was almost three hours before the resignation!

Duff McKagan
05-05-2010, 07:42 PM
After 54 ... Ke8 the winning plan seems clear: f4, g4, f5, ...exf5; gxf5,
Then W has K on g5, B on e5, Ps on d6 & f5. Bl's K on f7, B on d7, P on h7. Q-side Ps as they are. Then Bg3-h4, Kf4-e5, f6, and Kd4-c5-b6 wins. I can't see what Bl can do against this plan. If he pushes the h-Pawn to h5 or h6 I think he will lose it due to zugzwangs, if White even needs to win it.

Black's defence to this is the king goes to d7 not f7. Bishop say to d3 to defend h7 momentarily. After trading on f5 Black plays ...h6+. Then if White's King comes back to f4 there is ...h5 and ...h4 and maybe even ...h3. When white pushes f5-f6 then Ke6 comes. White's King cannot defend d6 in time for the bishop to leave its guard.

Also if say Bg3 with idea to come to h4 to block the h-pawn.. Black will just wait with the bishop until f6 is played (any immediate Bh4 loses d-pawn to Kxd6 and the Black king will reach e8 in time to blockade the f-pawn), and then ...Ke6 comes. d-pawn desperadoes enable Black's king to reach e8 in time to blockade the f-pawn (White's King is on g5 blocking the bishop from controlling e7).

Solo
05-05-2010, 08:09 PM
Black's defence to this is the king goes to d7 not f7. Bishop say to d3 to defend h7 momentarily. After trading on f5 Black plays ...h6+. Then if White's King comes back to f4 there is ...h5 and ...h4 and maybe even ...h3. When white pushes f5-f6 then Ke6 comes. White's King cannot defend d6 in time for the bishop to leave its guard.

Also if say Bf2 with idea to come to h4 to block the h-pawn.. Black will just wait with the bishop until f6 is played (any immediate Bh4 loses d-pawn to Kxd6 and the Black king will reach e8 in time to blockade the f-pawn), and then ...Ke6 comes. d-pawn desperadoes enable Black's king to reach e8 in time to blockade the f-pawn (White's King is on g5 blocking the bishop from controlling e7).
Good suggestion Duff, but White still wins. The position is White K on g5, B on e5, Ps on d6 & f5, Bl K on d7 and B on d3 and after ...h6+.

Then Kf6, Bc2; (if ...h5; Kg5 Bl loses the Pawn.) Bf4, Bd3; Ke5, h5; Bg3, Bc4; Kf6, h4; Bh2, Bd3; Kg5, Bc2; Kg4, Bd3; Be5, Be4; f6 & Kxh3.

Solo
05-05-2010, 08:13 PM
Good suggestion Duff, but White still wins. The position is White K on g5, B on e5, Ps on d6 & f5, Bl K on d7 and B on d3 and after ...h6+.

Then Kf6, Bc2; (if ...h5; Kg5 Bl loses the Pawn.) Bf4, Bd3; Ke5, h5; Bg3, Bc4; Kf6, h4; Bh2, Bd3; Kg5, Bc2; Kg4, Bd3; Be5, Be4; f6 & Kxh3.
*I meant to include ...h3 for Black in the above line

Vlad
05-05-2010, 09:34 PM
Good suggestion Duff, but White still wins. The position is White K on g5, B on e5, Ps on d6 & f5, Bl K on d7 and B on d3 and after ...h6+.

Then Kf6, Bc2; (if ...h5; Kg5 Bl loses the Pawn.) Bf4, Bd3; Ke5, h5; Bg3, Bc4; Kf6, h4; Bh2, Bd3; Kg5...

Agreed up to Kg5... Bc2 is a mistake... instead play h3... I do not see how you win from there...

Vlad
05-05-2010, 09:59 PM
Say after h3 we have Be5 Be4 Kg4 then Bg2 defending the passer...f6 Ke6 and black comfortably holds...

Another possibility is h3 Be5 Be4 and now f6 Ke6 and again I do not see what white can do...

Kevin Bonham
05-05-2010, 10:30 PM
Then Kf6, Bc2; (if ...h5; Kg5 Bl loses the Pawn.) Bf4, Bd3; Ke5, h5; Bg3, Bc4; Kf6, h4; Bh2, Bd3; Kg5, Bc2; Kg4, Bd3; Be5, Be4; f6 & Kxh3.

So I gather at the end of that with the subsequent note we have something like White Kh3, Be5, Pd6,f6,b2, a5 and Black Kd7 Be4, Pb7, a6. Black to move.

I think this might still be a draw even two pawns down, but if so very tricky.
Black plays 1...Ke6 and 2...Bc6. Thereafter if white tries to win down the kingside by going to g5, black plays Kf7. When the white king goes to the f-file black plays Ke6, and if white tries to come around the other side white can play Be8, Kd7 and Bf7 in the three moves it takes white to move his king to e, d and c files arriving on c5. But after Kb6 by white, black plays Bd6 guarding the b-pawn and f7 is too slow, while if White makes tempo moves Black can play K-d8-d7 etc.

White can try (K on b6 B on d5) b4 Kd8, b5 axb7, Kxb5 Kd7, Kb6 Kc7, B moves Kd7, f7 Bxf7, Kxb7 but it doesn't actually win! Bd5+ and black just moves the B on the long diagonal until white plays Ka7 then plays Kc8 and there is no way for white to get the a-pawn through, while saccing the d-pawn is obviously useless.

An important point is that if White goes to f5 with B on e5, black k on f7, then Bd7+ is necessary followed by Be6 and then the king can go e8-d7 without needing an extra bishop move.

Vlad
06-05-2010, 12:18 AM
White can try (K on b6 B on d5) b4 Kd8, b5 axb7, Kxb5 Kd7, Kb6 Kc7, B moves Kd7, f7 Bxf7, Kxb7 but it doesn't actually win! Bd5+ and black just moves the B on the long diagonal until white plays Ka7 then plays Kc8 and there is no way for white to get the a-pawn through, while saccing the d-pawn is obviously useless.


I think I know how to improve this variation for white. After black takes on b5 do not take it with the king instead blockade it by the bishop. Then exchange f6 for b7. The position with white pawns on d6 and a5 should be winning when there is a black pawn on b5. Now if Bd5+ king just goes to b8 and there is no Bc4 because b5 is on the way.

Kevin Bonham
06-05-2010, 01:52 AM
I think I know how to improve this variation for white. After black takes on b5 do not take it with the king instead blockade it by the bishop. Then exchange f6 for b7. The position with white pawns on d6 and a5 should be winning when there is a black pawn on b5. Now if Bd5+ king just goes to b8 and there is no Bc4 because b5 is on the way.

Ah yes I didn't notice Bc4 was needed in my previous line if the king went to b8.

That blockade idea is really neat. It seems that the way to do it is when the black king is on the back row, sneak the B around from e5-d4-c5 so that it can blockade the new b-pawn on that critical square immediately.

In this line black can play Kc8 and force white to give up the d-pawn instead of the f-pawn. But the ending with a and f pawn against b pawn appears to be a win anyway as would be expected with pawns that far separated.

There is also a try (after f7 Bxf7) Kxb7 Be6, but now a6! Bc8+, Ka7! wins.

Very nice.

So it looks like we may have to look at:


Agreed up to Kg5... Bc2 is a mistake... instead play h3... I do not see how you win from there...

Igor_Goldenberg
06-05-2010, 09:21 AM
2. Try 35.Kd2 for starters
What is the plan?

Igor_Goldenberg
06-05-2010, 09:27 AM
I think I know how to improve this variation for white. After black takes on b5 do not take it with the king instead blockade it by the bishop. Then exchange f6 for b7. The position with white pawns on d6 and a5 should be winning when there is a black pawn on b5. Now if Bd5+ king just goes to b8 and there is no Bc4 because b5 is on the way.
It only works with white bishop on a3-f8 diagonal.
Otherwise after Bd5+ Kb8 black simply pushes b pawn to distract the white bishop and captures d6 pawn.

Solo
06-05-2010, 03:45 PM
Agreed up to Kg5... Bc2 is a mistake... instead play h3... I do not see how you win from there...
Yes you are correct, and it appears to be a draw:doh: . ...h6+ in that position was an only drawing move! Later in the position White: Kg4, Be5, Ps a5, b2, d6, f5 and Black K d7, Bg2, Ps a6, b7, h3. Here the main line would be 1. b3! Bf1! 2. f5 Ke6 3. Kg5 Bd3; and if White tries 4. d7 Kxd7 5. Kh6 Ke6 6. Kg7 Kxe5! But I think if Black played here 1...Bd5? 2. Kxh3 Bxb3 3.Kg4 I believe White is winning this ending even without the b-Pawn!:)

I think Anand played ...Bc6?? to stop this plan, missing the simpler win played!

Igor_Goldenberg
06-05-2010, 04:45 PM
But I think if Black played here 1...Bd5? 2. Kxh3 Bxb3 3.Kg4 I believe White is winning this ending even without the b-Pawn!:)


How? Black blocks f and d pawns and alternate king and bishop to prevent white king from breakthrough. Even swapping f pawn for b7 pawn does not win (as Kevin's post)

Solo
06-05-2010, 11:19 PM
White hasn't played f6 yet so White will bring the K to e5 and Bl will have to play Ke8, whereupon I think White can win.

Kevin Bonham
07-05-2010, 05:21 AM
Game 9. Anand-Topalov. I've had a bash at computer-assisted analysis through the game and following various sites but the following is all provisional and corrections, suggestions and still further missed wins for Anand welcome! Anand was very unlucky; Topalov made a fair few errors or dubious decisions but the position was often very complex and even at these time limits he just could not see everything.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 c5 6.Nf3 d5 7.0-0 cxd4 8.exd4 dxc4 9.Bxc4 b6 10.Bg5 Bb7 11.Re1 Nbd7 12.Rc1 Rc8 13.Bd3 Re8 14.Qe2 Bxc3 15.bxc3 Qc7 16.Bh4 Nh5 17.Ng5 g6 18.Nh3 e5 19.f3 Qd6 20.Bf2 exd4 Seems quite risky as although white's rooks are initially passive later on they become more dangerous. 21.Qxe8+ Rxe8 22.Rxe8+ Nf8 23.cxd4 Nf6 24.Ree1 Ne6 25.Bc4 Bd5 26.Bg3 Qb4 27.Be5 Nd7 28.a3 Qa4 29.Bxd5 Nxe5 30.Bxe6 Qxd4+ 31.Kh1 fxe6 32.Ng5 Qd6 33.Ne4 [33.Nxe6!?][ 33.Rc8+! Kg7 34.Rec1 Kh6 35.h4 Kh5 36.Rh8 h6 37.Re1 winning according to Shipov.] 33...Qxa3 34.Rc3 Qb2 35.h4 b5? Has to be an error because in many lines the a-pawn will fall, if Black wanted to push a pawn why not a5 36.Rc8+ Kg7 37.Rc7+ Kf8 38.Ng5 [38.Rd1 Solo in shoutbox 38...Nd3! everything else loses horrendously; I haven't found a forced win against this move yet but that doesn't mean there's none there] 38...Ke8 39.Rxh7 [39.Nxe6 may be winning but is tricky. A critical line is 39...Nxf3 40.Rd1 Nd2 41.Rxa7 Qe5 42.Rxh7 b4 43.Nc5 Qxc5 44.Ra1 Qc6 45.Ra8+! Qxa8 46.Rh8+ Kd7 47.Rxa8 Kc6 (47...b3 appears to lose after 48.Rb8) 48.Rb8 Kc5 and I'm not sure if this exchange-down ending can be held] 39...Qc3 40.Rh8+? Time trouble [40.Re2 appears to win][40.Re4 also does, 40...b4 41.Rxa7 b3 42.Rb7 b2 43.Kh2 Qc1 44.Ra4 winning the b-pawn- Shipov/Kasparov] 40...Kd7 41.Rh7+ Kc6 42.Re4 b4 43.Nxe6 [43.Re7 b3 44.Rxe6+ Kd5 45.R6xe5+ Qxe5 46.Rxe5+ Kxe5 47.Ne4 b2 draw] 43...Kb6 44.Nf4 Qa1+ This puts the queen a bit out of play compared to the correct c1 45.Kh2 a5 This seems to be the real error but for very subtle reasons. [45...Nc6 46.h5 gxh5 47.Rxh5 (47.Nd5+ Kb5 48.Nxb4 Nxb4 49.Rb7+ Kc5 50.Rbxb4 better for white but I doubt it's a win) 47...b3 48.Nd5+ Kb7 49.Rh7+ Ka6 50.Re6 Ka5 and now 51.Rh5 Nd4 and unlike in the game there is no 52.Nb6+?? ] 46.h5 gxh5 [46...g5 is not as bad but still very ugly] 47.Rxh5 Nc6 48.Nd5+ Kb7 49.Rh7+ Ka6 50.Re6 Kb5 51.Rh5 Nd4 52.Nb6+ Ka6 53.Rd6 Kb7 54.Nc4 [54.Nd5 is completely winning, the king hides easily after the sac attempt 54...Nxf3+] 54...Nxf3+ 55.gxf3 Qa2+ 56.Nd2 Kc7 57.Rhd5 b3 58.Rd7+ Kc8 59.Rd8+ Kc7 60.R8d7+ Kc8 61.Rg7 a4 [61...Qc2 also seems to lose after 62.Rgg5 but it's trickier.] 62.Rc5+ Kb8 [62...Kd8 and if white doesn't repeat once the following fails spectacularly: 63.Rh5 Qxd2+!! 64.Kh3! Qd7+! 65.Rxd7+ Kxd7 and this is a tablebase draw!] 63.Rd5 Kc8 64.Kg3? And now black is OK again for the first time since move 45 [64.Rdd7 appears to win eg 64...a3 65.Kg3! Qa1 forced 66.Rc7+ Kb8 67.Rb7+ Kc8 68.Nxb3 and there does not seem to be any perpetual.] 64...Qa1 65.Rg4 b2 66.Rc4+ Kb7 67.Kf2 b1=Q 68.Nxb1 Qxb1 69.Rdd4 Qa2+ 70.Kg3 a3 71.Rc3 Qa1 72.Rb4+ Ka6 73.Ra4+ Kb5 74.Rcxa3 Qg1+ 75.Kf4 Qc1+ 76.Kf5 Qc5+ 77.Ke4 Qc2+ 78.Ke3 Qc1+ 79.Kf2 Qd2+ 80.Kg3 Qe1+ 81.Kf4 Qc1+ 82.Kg3 Qg1+ 83.Kf4 ˝-˝

Igor_Goldenberg
07-05-2010, 10:17 AM
White hasn't played f6 yet so White will bring the K to e5 and Bl will have to play Ke8, whereupon I think White can win.
It only works if white still has b-pawn.

Kevin Bonham
07-05-2010, 11:08 PM
GM Ian Rogers has been writing up the games for a general audience (but also for a chessplayer audience) at Crikey:

http://www.crikey.com.au/topic/world-championship-chess/

I believe this is available to non-subscribers but if not let me know. (In any case I think it is possible to trial-subscribe for free.)

Round 3/4 report especially funny!

Garvinator
08-05-2010, 12:04 AM
GM Ian Rogers has been writing up the games for a general audience (but also for a chessplayer audience) at Crikey:

http://www.crikey.com.au/topic/world-championship-chess/

I believe this is available to non-subscribers but if not let me know. (In any case I think it is possible to trial-subscribe for free.)

Round 3/4 report especially funny!
Looks like 21 day free registration period.

Kevin Bonham
08-05-2010, 03:34 AM
Game 10

Topalov-Anand

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.0-0 b6 11.Qd2 Bb7 12.Rac1 Rc8 13.Rfd1 cxd4 14.cxd4 Qd6 15.d5 Na5 16.Bb5 Rxc1 17.Rxc1 Rc8 18.h3 Rxc1+ 19.Qxc1 e6 20.Nf4 exd5 21.Nxd5 f5 22.f3 fxe4 23.fxe4 Qe5 24.Bd3 Nc6 25.Ba6 Nd4 26.Qc4 Bxd5 27.Qxd5+ Qxd5 28.exd5 Be5 29.Kf2 Kf7 30.Bg5 Nf5 31.g4 Nd6 32.Kf3 Ne8 33.Bc1 Nc7 34.Bd3 Bd6 35.Ke4 b5 36.Kd4 a6 37.Be2 Ke7 38.Bg5+ Kd7 39.Bd2 Bg3 40.g5 Bf2+ 41.Ke5 Bg3+ 42.Ke4 Ne8 43.Bg4+ Ke7 44.Be6 Nd6+ 45.Kf3 Nc4 46.Bc1 Bd6 47.Ke4 a5 48.Bg4 Ba3 49.Bxa3+ Nxa3 50.Ke5 Nc4+ 51.Kd4 Kd6 52.Be2 Na3 53.h4 Nc2+ 54.Kc3 Nb4 55.Bxb5 Nxa2+ 56.Kb3 Nb4 57.Be2 Nxd5 58.h5 Nf4 59.hxg6 hxg6 60.Bc4 draw

Garvinator
08-05-2010, 09:02 PM
Massive crowds pack the auditorium!

CameronD
08-05-2010, 09:29 PM
I couldnt think of anything more boring than sitting there. Watch it at home with commentary


Massive crowds pack the auditorium!

Kevin Bonham
10-05-2010, 03:46 AM
Anand - Topalov

1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.g3 d5 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.Bg2 Nb6 7.0-0 Be7 8.a3 0-0 9.b4 Be6 10.d3 f6 11.Ne4 Qe8 12.Nc5 Bxc5 13.bxc5 Nd5 14.Bb2 Rd8 15.Qc2 Nde7 16.Rab1 Ba2 17.Rbc1 Qf7 18.Bc3 Rd7 19.Qb2 Rb8 20.Rfd1 Be6 21.Rd2 h6 22.Qb1 Nd5 23.Rb2 b6 24.cxb6 cxb6 25.Bd2 Rd6 26.Rbc2 Qd7 27.h4 Rd8 28.Qb5 Nde7 29.Qb2 Bd5 30.Bb4 Nxb4 31.axb4 Rc6 32.b5 Rxc2 33.Rxc2 Be6 34.d4 e4 35.Nd2 Qxd4 36.Nxe4 Qxb2 37.Rxb2 Kf7 38.e3 g5 39.hxg5 hxg5 40.f4 gxf4 41.exf4 Rd4 42.Kf2 Nf5 43.Bf3 Bd5 44.Nd2 Bxf3 45.Nxf3 Ra4 46.g4 Nd6 47.Kg3 Ne4+ 48.Kh4 Nd6 49.Rd2 Nxb5 50.f5 Re4 51.Kh5 Re3 52.Nh4 Nc3 53.Rd7+ Re7 54.Rd3 Ne4 55.Ng6 Nc5 56.Ra3 Rd7 57.Re3 Kg7 58.g5 b5 59.Nf4 b4 60.g6 b3 61.Rc3 Rd4 62.Rxc5 Rxf4 63.Rc7+ Kg8 64.Rb7 Rf3 65.Rb8+ Kg7 draw

Kevin Bonham
10-05-2010, 04:03 AM
If I have the schedule right then Monday night is a rest day before game 12 on Tuesday night, and if there are playoffs they are on Thursday night.

Oepty
10-05-2010, 12:27 PM
If I have the schedule right then Monday night is a rest day before game 12 on Tuesday night, and if there are playoffs they are on Thursday night.

Yes that appears to be so which means I cannot follow the last game. I was looking forward to it tonight, but tommorrow night is no good. I am not happy.
Scott

Oepty
10-05-2010, 01:00 PM
The swapped whites after the rest day to keep it even and they throw in an extra rest day so Topalov has an extra white after a rest day. It does not seem fair. Don't know why they bothered swapping the whites around if they are going to put in this extra rest day.
Scott

Kevin Bonham
10-05-2010, 03:21 PM
The swapped whites after the rest day to keep it even and they throw in an extra rest day so Topalov has an extra white after a rest day. It does not seem fair. Don't know why they bothered swapping the whites around if they are going to put in this extra rest day.
Scott

I think there has always been a rest day before day 12 so there was no deliberate favouritism towards Topalov, but rather an arguable advantage that could have gone randomly to either side.

That said Anand may need that rest day more than Topa does!

Oepty
10-05-2010, 07:14 PM
I think there has always been a rest day before day 12 so there was no deliberate favouritism towards Topalov, but rather an arguable advantage that could have gone randomly to either side.

That said Anand may need that rest day more than Topa does!

Kevin, I never claimed there was any deliberate favouritism to Topalov, and the same thought had occurred to me that it was decided before the colours was decided.
Scott

Kevin Bonham
11-05-2010, 11:23 PM
I have mentioned the unusual way Topalov holds his hand against the size of his head several times during the match. A (poor quality) image of it is below.

ER
12-05-2010, 02:38 AM
Congratulations to

Igor_Goldenberg, Kevin Bonham, Saragossa, Solo, TheRealDeal, Viewed

for predicting the outcome and the score of the match!!!:clap: :clap:

Capablanca-Fan
12-05-2010, 04:21 AM
Congratulations to

Igor_Goldenberg, Kevin Bonham, Saragossa, Solo, TheRealDeal, Viewed

for predicting the outcome and the score of the match!!!:clap: :clap:
A nicely played win with Black, although he played the Lasker Defence with is designed to be equalizing. White tried for more, but got less as Black's B became powerful, and he blasted open the diagonal.

Igor_Goldenberg
12-05-2010, 09:40 AM
Amazing last game. I remember Ian Rogers mentioned few years ago that if black always can draw against d4 if that's the sole aim. For that he played Lasker defence (and achieved a very quick and easy draw!).

arosar
12-05-2010, 11:11 AM
I have mentioned the unusual way Topalov holds his hand against the size of his head several times during the match. A (poor quality) image of it is below.

It looks like he's folding his ear downwards. I see lots of other players do that.

AR

antichrist
12-05-2010, 12:28 PM
Amazing last game. I remember Ian Rogers mentioned few years ago that if black always can draw against d4 if that's the sole aim. For that he played Lasker defence (and achieved a very quick and easy draw!).

What I don't find among younger players is a knowledge of Lasker's stragegy, which happened to be the only place I gound such strategy. Why isn't it popular?

Desmond
12-05-2010, 12:42 PM
Could someone please post the game?

ER
12-05-2010, 01:58 PM
Could someone please post the game?

Here Boris:

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 0-0 7.e3 Ne4 8.Bxe7 Qxe7 9.Rc1 c6 10.Be2 Nxc3 11.Rxc3 dxc4 12.Bxc4 Nd7 13.0-0 b6 14.Bd3 c5 15.Be4 Rb8 16.Qc2 Nf6 17.dxc5 Nxe4 18.Qxe4 bxc5 19.Qc2N Bb7 20.Nd2 Rfd8 21.f3 Ba6 22.Rf2 Rd7 23.g3 Rbd8 24.Kg2 Bd3 25.Qc1 Ba6 26.Ra3 Bb7 27.Nb3 Rc7 28.Na5 Ba8 29.Nc4 e5 30.e4 f5 31.exf5 e4 32.fxe4 Qxe4 33.Kh3 Rd4 34.Ne3 Qe8 35.g4 h5 36.Kh4 g5 37.fxg6 Qxg6 38.Qf1 Rxg4 39.Kh3 Re7 40.Rf8 Kg7 41.Nf5 Kh7 42.Rg3 Rxg3 43.hxg3 Qg4 44.Kh2 Re2 45.Kg1 Rg2 46.Qxg2 Bxg2 47.Kxg2 Qe2 48.Kh3 c4 49.a4 a5 50.Rf6 Kg8 51.Nh6 Kg7 52.Rb6 Qe4 53.Kh2 Kh7 54.Rd6 Qe5 55.Nf7 Qxb2 56.Kh3 Qg7
0-1

peter_parr
12-05-2010, 02:47 PM
The first eleven games have all appeared in regular extra columns in the Sydney Morning Herald.

How is the coverage in other newspapers around Australia?

SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2010.htm)

Garvinator
12-05-2010, 03:31 PM
The first eleven games have all appeared in regular extra columns in the Sydney Morning Herald.

How is the coverage in other newspapers around Australia?

SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2010.htm)
Not much about the world champs in the courier mail up here, but this article did appear yesterday.

In Armenia chess is king and grandmasters are stars
MICHAEL MAINVILLE
May 7, 2010


With matches dissected on the nightly news, its masters treated as sports stars and victories celebrated like national holidays, chess is the king of games in Armenia.

Tiny, isolated and impoverished, ex-Soviet Armenia has nonetheless emerged as a superpower in the chess world, storming international tournaments and rankings.

And as its national team prepares for the international Chess Olympiad this September in the Russian city of Khanty-Mansiysk, the chess-mad country is in the kind of frenzy of anticipation that most countries reserve for the football World Cup.

"Armenians are absolutely crazy for chess," said Ludvig Sharoian, one of dozens of men playing blitz matches on a spring day in Armenia's House of Chess in central Yerevan.

"When your country is good at something, of course people are going to be very supportive. And Armenians are very good at chess," he said.

Despite its population of only 3.2 million, in recent years Armenia has managed to outdo traditional chess powerhouses such as Russia and the United States and emerging giants China and India.

Its national team has won gold at the last two international Chess Olympiads, in 2006 and 2008, after taking bronze at the previous two. Armenia has 30 grandmasters, the rank awarded to more than 1,000 top global players, and three players in the top 100, only one less than the United States.

Armenians have been playing chess for centuries, since its earlier form chatrang was introduced when the region was part of Sassanid Persia, and the game was heavily promoted when Armenia was part of the Soviet Union.

But players and fans here said that this alone did not explain the country's passion for the game.

The key to understanding why Armenians both love and excel at chess, they said, is a 1963 world championship match featuring the country's most prominent player, the legendary Tigran Petrosian.

Petrosian faced Russian Mikhail Botvinnik in the match and as each move was made it was relayed by telex from Moscow and displayed on a giant board in Yerevan's central Opera Square, where thousands gathered day after day to analyse the moves.

After 22 games played over nearly two months, Petrosian had scored a decisive victory, prompting massive celebrations and an outpouring of nationalist pride.

"That was what started it all. It was a fantastic example for the development of chess in Armenia," said Armenia's national chess team coach, Arshak Petrosian, no relation to the legendary player.

Chess quickly became a national obsession and enthusiasm for the game has only grown in the decades since.

Grandmaster Levon Aronian, currently ranked number five in the world, is the closest Armenia has to a modern-day Petrosian. Instantly recognisable to Armenians, 27-year-old Aronian has been dubbed the country's David Beckham and his career is as closely followed here.

He has even added a touch of tabloid-style scandal to the chess world through his relationship with chess master Arianne Caoili, a beautiful Philippines-born Australian who has appeared on reality television show Dancing with the Stars.

Their relationship caused waves in the insular world of international chess four years ago after a rival grandmaster became jealous of Aronian dancing with Caoili and punched the Armenian player during an after-tournament party.

On a break from training for the upcoming olympiad in Yerevan, Aronian said one of the reasons that Armenians excel at chess is that they are individualistic and drawn to one-on-one competition instead of team sports.

"From my childhood I would see people playing backgammon on the streets. Everyone is crazy about playing boardgames. We love to compete against each other in mind games," he said.

The country's recent chess victories are also feeding a new generation of fans and players, he said.

"When you're successful internationally that helps attract more people to chess," he said.

Chess great Garry Kasparov, who is half Armenian, has also been an inspiration to many young players in the country, Aronian said, even though he represented Russia after the break-up of the Soviet Union.

Strong government support is another factor in Armenia's rise to the top of the chess world.

The country's chess players are given a salary by the state of about the average national wage, on top of their substantial earnings from prizes, and the government has set up sophisticated training programmes for new young players.

Chess is included in the country's physical education curriculum and nearly half of the country's schools offer after-school chess programmes. President Serzh Sarkisian, who doubles as head of the country's chess federation, has even proposed making chess an obligatory part of the national school curriculum.

Petrosian, the national team coach, said he expects the country's next generation of players to be as good, if not better, than Armenia's current grandmasters.

"Chess is going through a very big boom right now and Armenia is only going to get better," he said.

Denis_Jessop
12-05-2010, 09:30 PM
Not much about the world champs in the courier mail up here, but this article did appear yesterday.

In Armenia chess is king and grandmasters are stars
MICHAEL MAINVILLE
May 7, 2010

We had that article in the "Canberra Times" this morning. I don't think it'sparticularly good though perhaps better than nothing.

There has been nothing in general news in the "Canberra Times" about the title match that I have seen but I don't see Ian Rogers' column as I don't get the Sunday "Canberra Times". I'd imagine he has written about it.

DJ

ER
13-05-2010, 06:00 AM
I know there are some people who still don't go online, but with the advent of the Internet many prefer the online coverage, expert comments, video & radio broadcasts etc.
However, I still remember with fondness the good old days with newspaper coverage when one had to wait 1-2 or even 3 days sometimes before the actual results of the games with the moves and some commentary (if we were lucky) were published!
Peter Parr was of course always a pioneer in the fight to promote chess in newspapers those days as he is a tour de force behind everything that has to do with chess these days!

Lakshman
13-05-2010, 06:12 AM
The first eleven games have all appeared in regular extra columns in the Sydney Morning Herald.

How is the coverage in other newspapers around Australia?

SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/2010.htm)

Articles in leading Indian newspapers.

http://www.thehindu.com/2010/05/13/stories/2010051356691900.htm

http://www.thehindu.com/2010/05/13/stories/2010051356511900.htm

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Sports/More-Sports/Chess/Anand-relieved-after-ending-black-jinx-against-Topalov/articleshow/5922071.cms

Indian Chess Federation

http://www.indianchessfed.org/

Watto
13-05-2010, 10:54 AM
Articles in leading Indian newspapers.

http://www.thehindu.com/2010/05/13/stories/2010051356691900.htm

http://www.thehindu.com/2010/05/13/stories/2010051356511900.htm

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Sports/More-Sports/Chess/Anand-relieved-after-ending-black-jinx-against-Topalov/articleshow/5922071.cms

Indian Chess Federation

http://www.indianchessfed.org/
Thanks for the links, Lakshman. Very interesting to hear Anand's take on the championship.

I liked Anand’s mother’s story about buying him a whole bunch of Archie comics when he was a kid to cheer him up after an early loss in a tournament… My dad did the same for me once, when I had the chicken pox. A great parenting decision I always thought!

Lakshman
13-05-2010, 12:13 PM
Thanks for the links, Lakshman. Very interesting to hear Anand's take on the championship.

I liked Anand’s mother’s story about buying him a whole bunch of Archie comics when he was a kid to cheer him up after an early loss in a tournament… My dad did the same for me once, when I had the chicken pox. A great parenting decision I always thought!


Jean,

I am glad you liked the links.

Indeed, his mother has been a source of inspiration when he was a kid as a matter of fact it was his mother who introduced him to Chess and I can imagine how proud she would be feeling today of his achievement/s.

Tony Dowden
13-05-2010, 07:27 PM
Congratulations to

Igor_Goldenberg, Kevin Bonham, Saragossa, Solo, TheRealDeal, Viewed

for predicting the outcome and the score of the match!!!:clap: :clap:

Looks like I forgot to vote but its interesting to think about it retrospectively too. I reckon +2, +3 or even +4 to Anand in terms of pure chess ability was a safe bet (indeed Topalov must be one of the weaker positional players to have competed for the world title in match play since World War 2). But when we factor in a couple of losses thanks to what I will politely call the 'social context' plus the occasional loss of concentration expected by an over-forty player, then plus one to Anand is logical.

ER
13-05-2010, 07:59 PM
Actually one only has to think about the achievements of Vishy, four times world champion in three different forms of deciding the title, plus rapid play world champion to top it up, is a great triumph and the Indian superstar deserves any admiration he can get! Here is the enthusiastic welcome Vishy and Aruna enjoyed at their arrival back home after the world championship match vs V. Kramnik
http://ibnlive.in.com/news/chess-icon-viswanathan-anand-gets-heros-welcome/78653-5.html

antichrist
13-05-2010, 08:14 PM
IPeter Parr was of course always a pioneer in the fight to promote chess in newspapers those days as he is a tour de force behind everything that has to do with chess these days!

This may be so but I am not aware of. I remember that Koshinski(?) columnist before Peter, but when they changed the section of SMH it appeared in I did not realise and stopped reading. Was Koshi's column in SMH?

Ian has covered a few games but gave an excellent history of Campones(?) from Philippines. They probably met quite a few times I imagine.

Adamski
13-05-2010, 08:24 PM
This may be so but I am not aware of. I remember that Koshinski(?) columnist before Peter, but when they changed the section of SMH it appeared in I did not realise and stopped reading. Was Koshi's column in SMH?

Ian has covered a few games but gave an excellent history of Campones(?) from Philippines. They probably met quite a few times I imagine.
Was Koshnitsky ever an SMH chess columnist? We all know Campomanes (RIP) was a President of FIDE.

antichrist
13-05-2010, 08:58 PM
Was Koshnitsky ever an SMH chess columnist? We all know Campomanes (RIP) was a President of FIDE.

Well Koshnitsky certainly wrote somewhere for many years, I am sure in the seventies if not also sixties he was a columnist. But when I was in Townsville with no SMH I may have been reading the Australian and maybe he was in there??? I followed all of Fisher/Spassky games somewhere. I was playing against Filipino seamen who used to come into Townsville harbour but I did not beat many.

Lakshman
14-05-2010, 07:06 AM
Actually one only has to think about the achievements of Vishy, four times world champion in three different forms of deciding the title, plus rapid play world champion to top it up, is a great triumph and the Indian superstar deserves any admiration he can get! Here is the enthusiastic welcome Vishy and Aruna enjoyed at their arrival back home after the world championship match vs V. Kramnik
http://ibnlive.in.com/news/chess-icon-viswanathan-anand-gets-heros-welcome/78653-5.html

Nice clip JaK, actually i saw this live broadcast on paytv.

Wonder the reception he will recieve this time when he returns to India.

ER
14-05-2010, 09:09 AM
Nice clip JaK, actually i saw this live broadcast on paytv.

Wonder the reception he will recieve this time when he returns to India.

Thanks, he deserves the best, he is a real inspiration as a sportsperson, intellectual and social role model. As I was reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viswanathan_Anand he has already been awarded India's second highest civilian award, the Padma Vibhushan, making him the first sportsperson to receive the award in Indian history and he was also the first recipient of the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award in 1991–92, India's highest sporting honour.
In my opinion Vishy a reflection of India's admirable success as a fast improving modern society, in connection with a glorious past in history and culture. From the same source I also learnt that his brother and sister are doing exceptionally well in academic and business fileds.
Vishy is simply a great amongst the greatest!

Lakshman
14-05-2010, 10:36 AM
Thanks, he deserves the best, he is a real inspiration as a sportsperson, intellectual and social role model. As I was reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viswanathan_Anand he has already been awarded India's second highest civilian award, the Padma Vibhushan, making him the first sportsperson to receive the award in Indian history and he was also the first recipient of the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award in 1991–92, India's highest sporting honour.
In my opinion Vishy a reflection of India's admirable success as a fast improving modern society, in connection with a glorious past in history and culture. From the same source I also learnt that his brother and sister are doing exceptionally well in academic and business fileds.
Vishy is simply a great amongst the greatest!

Very well summarised JaK.

Indeed, he would definitely be nominated for the highest civilian awards come Jan'2011.

Please see the link below about Vishy's sponsors, as you might have noticed he has a small logo 'NIIT' on his shirt during major tournaments.

www.tnq.in/anand-niit.html

ER
14-05-2010, 12:02 PM
Please see the link below about Vishy's sponsors, as you might have noticed he has a small logo 'NIIT' on his shirt during major tournaments.

www.tnq.in/anand-niit.html

That's a good write - up, NIIT now have to rewrite the segment as Vishy rewrote Chess History! :)
Here is another clip where Vishy, even when encouraged, could not bring himself to say anything negative about his opponent!
(Ed. the clip doesn't download properly and I removed the URL).
The story was when Anand was specifically asked about tactics the Bulgarians used to unsettled him, they actually made reference to spectator interference) Vishy said that he was only concentrating on problems arising on the chessboard, and that whatever happened away from the board wasn't unethical etc. A true champion indeed!

Lakshman
14-05-2010, 12:58 PM
Vishy said that he was only concentrating on problems arising on the chessboard, and that whatever happened away from the board wasn't unethical etc. A true champion indeed!

Very true indeed and his comment is relevant to any game for that matter, in particular Chess being a mind game.

antichrist
14-05-2010, 06:10 PM
Sorry to be a bit off topic, I think it was someone Kellner who did one those early chess columns. Cant remember what paper though.

george
14-05-2010, 07:07 PM
Hi All,
Gary Koshnitsky wrote a regular chess column for decades in the Advertiser ( Adelaide paper). Alan Goldsmith now has a regular column in the Sunday Mail and IM Alexander Davidovic has a regular column in the Saturday Advertiser. Both these papers are owned by Rupert with the Advertiser absorbing the "News" an Adelaide afternoon daily which was Ruperts first newspaper.

Regards

Adamski
14-05-2010, 10:59 PM
Go glad that Danailov was on the losing side. It couldn't have happened to a "nicer" guy!

Lakshman
21-05-2010, 08:43 AM
http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/article434332.ece

Denis_Jessop
23-05-2010, 08:47 PM
Sorry to be a bit off topic, I think it was someone Kellner who did one those early chess columns. Cant remember what paper though.

Which early chess columns? As well as that referred to by George, Gary Koshnitsky did one weekly for the Sydney Sunday Herald/Sun Herald for very many years going back to the late 1940s when I was at school (I collected and still have the first 260 odd). Originally it included a game and a problem and some news but later comprised just a problem. I think John Kellner may have had a column in the Sydney "Daily Telegraph".

DJ