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Garvinator
13-12-2009, 10:46 AM
During a recent tournament a player has said to me that the wearing of headphones is now not allowed during play.

Does anyone know anything about whether this is a new regulation from Fide?

I have only been aware that it is up to the arbiter to decide in regards to the wearing of headphones.

Usually it comes down to whether or not the opponent is distracted or if anyone can hear noise being made by the phones.

I am not after peoples opinions on this subject (apologies if that sounds rude to put it like that), rather I am after whether there are hard and fast regulations stating one way or another if the wearing of headphones during play is now against any kind of law of chess.

From reading just the laws of chess, not other sections of the fide handbook, I am certain it does not appear in the 2009 fide laws of chess.

Denis_Jessop
13-12-2009, 12:09 PM
During a recent tournament a player has said to me that the wearing of headphones is now not allowed during play.

Does anyone know anything about whether this is a new regulation from Fide?

I have only been aware that it is up to the arbiter to decide in regards to the wearing of headphones.

Usually it comes down to whether or not the opponent is distracted or if anyone can hear noise being made by the phones.

I am not after peoples opinions on this subject (apologies if that sounds rude to put it like that), rather I am after whether there are hard and fast regulations stating one way or another if the wearing of headphones during play is now against any kind of law of chess.

From reading just the laws of chess, not other sections of the fide handbook, I am certain it does not appear in the 2009 fide laws of chess.

I know of nothing specifically referring to headphones but, arguably, they are an "electronic means of communication" (Art. 12.3.b) or, depending on the facts, constitute a distraction or annoyance within Art 12.6. Often the sound produced by headphones is audible nearby.

[I also have an unlikely argument that listening to Mozart's music while playing chess is a forbidden source of information under Art 12.3.a on the ground that listening to Mozart's music increases one's IQ by 10% :D ]

DJ

CameronD
13-12-2009, 12:48 PM
During the Australian Major in brisbane, my opponent wore headphones, but no one could hear them. I appealed to the arbiter, who told the player that he would be disqualified if caught again.

It would be under the electronic equipment laws to stop cheating. The player could have opening theory going through the phones or wireless connection to a thire.d person using an engine.

Rincewind
13-12-2009, 03:22 PM
NSWCA may have issued a specific ruling on this for NSWCA events (no headphones). Bill may remember the details but I believe it was after complaints about one particular player.

Kevin Bonham
13-12-2009, 04:11 PM
If the headphones are audible, even softly, to other players, then they are a "source of noise" and the player transgresses by bringing them into the playing area.

If they are inaudible to other players then there is no specific rule but it is obviously reasonable to ban them to exclude the possibility of cheating.

Denis_Jessop
13-12-2009, 07:12 PM
If the headphones are audible, even softly, to other players, then they are a "source of noise" and the player transgresses by bringing them into the playing area.

If they are inaudible to other players then there is no specific rule but it is obviously reasonable to ban them to exclude the possibility of cheating.

As I mentioned above, headphones must also surely be an "electronic means of communication" as they electronically relay what is produced by the source (CD, tape, radio etc) from the source via an amplifier to the hearer.

DJ

road runner
13-12-2009, 07:53 PM
As I mentioned above, headphones must also surely be an "electronic means of communication" as they electronically relay what is produced by the source (CD, tape, radio etc) from the source via an amplifier to the hearer.

DJ
Are digital watches electronic means of communicating the time? :rolleyes:

Denis_Jessop
13-12-2009, 10:33 PM
Are digital watches electronic means of communicating the time? :rolleyes:

Not in my opinion. But Dick Tracey's wrist radio was. :doh:

DJ

Garrett
14-12-2009, 07:00 AM
Are digital watches electronic means of communicating the time? :rolleyes:

I think in time even these will be banned. Not too hard to imagine a watch being able to relay information from a third party outside the hall based on the seconds ticking over or something like that (i.e. skips the '1' if queen move is best, skips the '2' if a rook move is best, skips a '3' if there's a good looking shiela get out here for a look etc) ...

I was thinking of asking whether I can wear a heart rate monitor at the Aust Reserves just out of interest to see how the heart rate changes when I get a good position against a strong player (assuming of course I manage to get a good position in this tournament) but thought it would probably raise too much suspicion. The heart rate monitor looks like a wrist watch.

cheers
Garrett.

road runner
14-12-2009, 10:28 AM
If you want an electronic appliance that has large potential for cheating in chess, have a look at google goggles.

William AS
14-12-2009, 01:10 PM
During the Australian Major in brisbane, my opponent wore headphones, but no one could hear them. I appealed to the arbiter, who told the player that he would be disqualified if caught again.

It would be under the electronic equipment laws to stop cheating. The player could have opening theory going through the phones or wireless connection to a third person using an engine.
In South Australia we definately do not allow headphones as they can easily be used for cheating. Digital watches are ok, but arbiters need to be aware that Mobile phones/MP3 player/Watch/PDA,s are now available which are small enough to wear on the wrist and could clearly be used to cheat.

Garvinator
14-12-2009, 02:12 PM
I was thinking of asking whether I can wear a heart rate monitor at the Aust Reserves just out of interest to see how the heart rate changes when I get a good position against a strong player (assuming of course I manage to get a good position in this tournament) but thought it would probably raise too much suspicion. The heart rate monitor looks like a wrist watch.
Could also be used to test how far chess players do walk during a 5 hour game. For some players, it would be quite a lot.

Trent Parker
15-12-2009, 11:18 AM
There's probably something somewhere on the bb (or old bb?) on this. IIRC a person who used to wear earphones was a person once thought to be.... chesslover but has never been confirmed but has been denied. The mystery continues all these years later! Ahem! Back on topic.

IIRC it was banned as one could possibly have taken notes and be playing it back to them using the headphones......