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Kevin Bonham
27-08-2009, 02:34 PM
Another interschool classic:

8/8/8/4b3/8/1pk5/8/2K5 b - - 0 1

Black played 1...b2+ 2.Kb1. Seeing that 2...Kb3 would be stalemate black realised he had to make a bishop move and played 2...Bd6. After 3.Ka2 black prepared to shepherd his pawn through with 3...Kc2 at which point white resigned.

However:

5.2 a The game is drawn when the player to move has no legal move and his king is not in check. The game is said to end in ‘stalemate’. This immediately ends the game, provided that the move producing the stalemate position was legal.

Both players were amazed when I told them that since there was stalemate on the board at the time white resigned, white's resignation did not stand and the game was in fact a draw.

This reminded me of my very first recorded rated game way back in 1987:

8/b7/8/8/8/3kp3/8/4K3 b - - 0 1

Here my opponent, a then fellow junior with a rating in the high 1100s, played 70....e2?? stalemate.

antichrist
27-08-2009, 06:44 PM
Both players were amazed when I told them that since there was stalemate on the board at the time white resigned, white's resignation did not stand and the game was in fact a draw.

don't players agreement take precedent over what an arbitar says?

Once someone resigns that is it.

Kevin Bonham
27-08-2009, 09:35 PM
don't players agreement take precedent over what an arbitar says?

Once someone resigns that is it.

No; see the rule I quoted above. Checkmate or stalemate immediately end the game.

Capablanca-Fan
27-08-2009, 10:27 PM
No; see the rule I quoted above. Checkmate or stalemate immediately end the game.
One of the most clear cut cases to rule on.

Hobbes
27-08-2009, 11:10 PM
In the 1980's Abraham Sztern (playing White) was offered a draw in the position below. He asked his opponent to make a move. After 28...Qb2 he resigned instead of accepting the draw.

But he did win a prize - Blunder of the Year, awarded by 'Not the British Chess Magazine'.

28.... Qxb2+

antichrist
28-08-2009, 01:16 PM
One of the most clear cut cases to rule on.

Well how come when two players had their kings checking each other for a few moves at Sydney tourney years ago they were able to keep on playing coz no player said anything. Even though the large audience were virtually splitting their undies in unbelief whilst trying to keep silent.

What you can get away with one gets away with. And I wont mention that certain country again.

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2009, 02:29 PM
Well how come when two players had their kings checking each other for a few moves at Sydney tourney years ago they were able to keep on playing coz no player said anything.

The arbiter, if watching, should stop this sort of nonsense and fix it immediately without waiting for the players to do anything.

Thunderspirit
31-08-2009, 08:45 AM
The arbiter, if watching, should stop this sort of nonsense and fix it immediately without waiting for the players to do anything.

Agreed. This is arbitering 101. The Stalemate ends the game immediately, but of course everyone expects these situations in school events.

It is afterall, all part of the education process.

Capablanca-Fan
31-08-2009, 09:44 AM
Even in Blitz, a stalemate ends the game. So if a stalemated player made an illegal move in response (by definition there is no legal move), the game would still be drawn. I don't know that Hurt Hayssen would agree though (http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=6929) :rolleyes:

FM_Bill
06-07-2010, 07:50 PM
In the 1972 australia Open M.Winslade fell into fork losing a rook. After the rook was taken, he resigned. He was stalemated though, and it was correctly ruled that stalemate ended the game.

Another way of looking at it is, you can only resign if you have a legal move.