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Jesper Norgaard
19-07-2009, 03:23 AM
It is an endgame position, White being behind with 2 pawns it looks unlikely he will be able to do anything out of the ordinary, but still ... White moves and wins!

8/2p5/3prpb1/4k3/4p3/4KP2/4NP2/2R5 w - - 0 1

If anybody knows who is the author of this presumably constructed exercise, I would be very happy to know. I got it from a School Chess column of the Danish Chess Magazine maybe 30 years ago, delivered by the (then) promising talent Curt Hansen to the Column. But no author was given.

Desmond
19-07-2009, 10:35 AM
beautiful

antichrist
19-07-2009, 11:35 AM
I dont know how to work that thing above (and without a board), but it looks pretty simple, white passes pawn and checks, then knight forks king and rook (I suppose that is how it goes)

Oepty
19-07-2009, 12:14 PM
I dont know how to work that thing above (and without a board), but it looks pretty simple, white passes pawn and checks, then knight forks king and rook (I suppose that is how it goes)

You mean 1. f4+ Kf5 2. Nd4+ Kg4 3. Nxe6 which does win. What about 1.f4+ Kd5. Nf4 is not possible because of the pawn. I haven't worked it out (yet?).
Scott.

Igor_Goldenberg
19-07-2009, 01:35 PM
You mean 1. f4+ Kf5 2. Nd4+ Kg4 3. Nxe6 which does win. What about 1.f4+ Kd5. Nf4 is not possible because of the pawn. I haven't worked it out (yet?).
Scott.
solution in white:
1.f4+ Kf5 2.f5 Bxf5 3.Nf4+ Ke5 4.Rd2 c6 5.Rd5+ cxd5 6.Nd3+ exd3 7.f4#
Well known study, but can't remember the author

Oepty
19-07-2009, 05:08 PM
Thanks Igor. I think you have a couple of errors in your solution. Kf5 should be Kd5 and one other typo.

Jesper Norgaard
19-07-2009, 05:51 PM
Well known study, but can't remember the author
Not really a difficult study once you get the idea of the checkmate, but a very pleasing finish. You got it right Igor, except for the typos of course.

Too bad about the author, I had been waiting 30 years to know who he is. Well maybe Curt Hansen knows, but I don't get often to Denmark.

Igor_Goldenberg
19-07-2009, 09:04 PM
Not really a difficult study once you get the idea of the checkmate, but a very pleasing finish. You got it right Igor, except for the typos of course.
I've seen it before (quite a few times and first long times ago).


Too bad about the author, I had been waiting 30 years to know who he is. Well maybe Curt Hansen knows, but I don't get often to Denmark.
I'll try to remember to post when I come across it again.

Sheroff
19-07-2009, 09:35 PM
Took me a minute and a half to get this one.

Looks like 1.f4+, Kd5 2.f5 Bxf5 3.Nf4+ Ke5 4.R to the d-file, to threaten Rd5mate, forcing ...c6. Then comes 5.Rd5+!! cxd5 6.Nd3+!! exd3, then 7.f4 mate. White has managed to force Black to block all his only possible escape squares.

I don't usually like problems, but this one was fun...


Cheers, Kevin Casey

PS Hey Igor, do you have a copy of Australian Chess Brilliancies yet????


kimpub@bigpond.net.au

Igor_Goldenberg
20-07-2009, 08:14 AM
PS Hey Igor, do you have a copy of Australian Chess Brilliancies yet????


Not yet.

Jesper Norgaard
11-02-2011, 04:57 PM
Finally found this study, just by stumbling over it.

http://problem64.beda.cz/silo/chernev_chessboard_magic_1943.pdf is quite a nice selection of 160 problems, and free at that. It turns out many of them composed by relatively unknown Russian composers, and lo and behold, on page 2 I find that A. S. KAKOVIN was the composer of that little gem. Never heard of the guy, but maybe as the Saavedra monk he could become world famous just from one single problem.

And then again, no. Nobody heard of Kakovin, right?

Igor_Goldenberg
11-02-2011, 05:39 PM
Born in 1910, published about 400 studies, Soviet chess composition master, took part in 4 USSR championship (as a chess composer), once came 6th.
I might've heard the name, but he is not very famous.

Kaitlin
12-02-2011, 12:39 PM
Put another puzzle

Jesper Norgaard
13-02-2011, 05:11 AM
Please, please, Kaitlin?

Here is a light little gem, White moves and wins - domination problem!

8/8/pP1P3K/k2r4/Pp6/1P6/1P2R3/8 w - - 0 1

Supplementary question, why on earth is there a white pawn on b2?

Kaitlin
13-02-2011, 10:42 AM
I would do:

????

:( I hope this isnt an easy one ????

Lekko
13-02-2011, 01:02 PM
Please, please, Kaitlin?

Here is a light little gem, White moves and wins - domination problem!

8/8/pP1P3K/k2r4/Pp6/1P6/1P2R3/8 w - - 0 1

Supplementary question, why on earth is there a white pawn on b2?
Re5. Rook can't deal with both the pawns.

Jesper Norgaard
13-02-2011, 01:04 PM
:( I hope this isnt an easy one ????

Ahem, hard pressed, no it's not an easy one. :uhoh:

I can give a little help. If 1.Re6 threatening b7 1...Kxb6 2.d7+,Kc7 3.Rxa6,Kxd7 (not Rxd7 because of Ra7+ winning) 4.Rb6 white is well on his way to winning - but after 2...Kb7! there seems to be no point. So 1.Re5! is the first move, forcing 1...Rxe5 2.d7 (not 2.b7??,Re8). Now what?

Kaitlin
13-02-2011, 01:38 PM
I was just about to put that answer :D

1. Re5 RxRe5
2. d7 ....

Jesper Norgaard
14-02-2011, 03:48 AM
I was just about to put that answer :D

1. Re5 RxRe5
2. d7 ....
Okay, Kaitlin, but how do you win against 2...Re6+
???
The idea is something like 3.Kh5,Rxb6 and 4.d8Q is stalemate :owned:

Igor_Goldenberg
14-02-2011, 02:07 PM
It's a beauty!

Desmond
14-02-2011, 02:35 PM
Supplementary question, why on earth is there a white pawn on b2?Interesting point. If we take it that the d6-pawn started its life on d2, then the b6 pawn must have started on e2 or f2!

Kaitlin
14-02-2011, 08:23 PM
Okay, Kaitlin, but how do you win against 2...Re6+
???
The idea is something like 3.Kh5,Rxb6 and 4.d8Q is stalemate :owned:

:( I don't understand the question and can't work out the question.


But, can I have another puzzle please :).



And no-one put any answers untill next Sunday.

Jesper Norgaard
15-02-2011, 02:53 AM
:( I don't understand the question and can't work out the question.

But, can I have another puzzle please :).
And no-one put any answers untill next Sunday.

Answers perhaps in white :)

Kaitlin, I think we are not quite finished with this one. Note Igor's comment, it's a beauty! So far you have only seen the pin ...

Your solution is the pin 1.Re5,Rxe5 2.d7 and now we want your answer to 2...Re6+ (ehm, you have 4 choices Kg7 or Kh7 or Kg5 or Kh5) and 3.Rxb6.

How do you win from here?

Cheer up, gal', there is time till Sunday if you put a little work in it ...

Garrett
15-02-2011, 10:42 AM
Lol - nice problem !

Desmond
15-02-2011, 12:23 PM
Answers perhaps in white :)

Kaitlin, I think we are not quite finished with this one. Note Igor's comment, it's a beauty! So far you have only seen the pin ...

Your solution is the pin 1.Re5,Rxe5 2.d7 and now we want your answer to 2...Re6+ (ehm, you have 4 choices Kg7 or Kh7 or Kg5 or Kh5) and 3.Rxb6.

How do you win from here?

Cheer up, gal', there is time till Sunday if you put a little work in it ...
I guess the main line is Rxb6 then d8=N in the line you gave earlier, when the black rook is dominated and wherever it moves it will be captured or forked and captured next move.

A variant would be if black doesn't take the b-pawn with the rook, with the idea of d8=Q then placing the rook next to the white king ad nauseum. The queen guards the b6-pawn so it's still a staley if the rook comes off the board.

I originally thought that that broke the study but I since found a solution.

Jesper Norgaard
15-02-2011, 06:03 PM
Interesting point. If we take it that the d6-pawn started its life on d2, then the b6 pawn must have started on e2 or f2!

To get c2xb3 and something like d4xc5xb6 and e2xd3 we need 4 pieces to give up in 4 transitions. It is the same result with e.g. c2xb3 and e2xd3xc4xb5 also 4 transitions are needed. That is easy since black needs only to keep 2 pawns and a rook, so can give up 6 pawns and 6 pieces.

More comments below in white:


I guess the main line is Rxb6 then d8=N in the line you gave earlier, when the black rook is dominated and wherever it moves it will be captured or forked and captured next move.
Correct.



A variant would be if black doesn't take the b-pawn with the rook, with the idea of d8=Q then placing the rook next to the white king ad nauseum. The queen guards the b6-pawn so it's still a staley if the rook comes off the board.

I originally thought that that broke the study but I since found a solution.

I had some trouble setting up that idea, for instance 2...Re7 3.b7! and it won't appear with a pawn on b6 - and note 3...Re6+ 4.Kg5 Rb6 5.Kf5! and black is in zugzwang.

So the most forcing line is simply 2...Rd5 3.b7,Rxd7 4.b8=Q Rd6+! and checks ad libitum in the d-file - how does white win? Black will not win by 5.Kg7? Rg6+ 6.Kf7 Rf6+ 7.Ke7 Re6+ 8.Kd7 Rd6+ 9.Kc7 Rc6+ 10.Kb7 Rb6+ 11.Ka7 Rb7+ 12.Ka8 Ra7+ for sure (a real King hunt, he, he) ... by the way it seems 11...Rxb8 12.Kxb8 Kb6 (taking the opposition with the only legal move) 13.Ka8 Ka5! or 13.Kc8 Kc6 black keeps the opposition and the draw since if white plays a5 black just runs back and capture it.

Kaitlin
15-02-2011, 06:37 PM
Step 1. I worked out the Question (I think).
Step 2. I'm not sure I haven't missed something in the Answer I worked out?



1. Re5 Rxe5 2. d7 Re6+ 3. Kg5 Rxb6 4. d8=Q *

Jesper Norgaard
16-02-2011, 01:11 PM
1. Re5 Rxe5 2. d7 Re6+ 3. Kg5 Rxb6 4. d8=Q *



1. Re5 Rxe5 2. d7 Re6+ 3. Kg5 Rxb6 4. d8=Q * is more or less the spite stalemate and just an obstacle to get to the solution(s). As Boris mentioned above, 4.d8=N! is the right way, and the rook is lost, for instance 4...Rb8 5.Nc6+ or 4...Rd6 5.Nb7+.

We have a few pending matters:

Question 2.1: How will white win after the straight-forward 1.Re5 Rxe5 2.d7 Rd5 3.b7 Rxd7 4.b8=Q Rd6+ followed by checks in the d-file?

Question 2.2: In which variation(s) is it important that there is a white pawn on b2, that is white can't win without it?

Oepty
16-02-2011, 01:44 PM
Lovely problem, enjoying it greatly.
Thanks
Scott

Igor_Goldenberg
16-02-2011, 05:15 PM
1. Re5 Rxe5 2. d7 Re6+ 3. Kg5 Rxb6 4. d8=Q * is more or less the spite stalemate and just an obstacle to get to the solution(s). As Boris mentioned above, 4.d8=N! is the right way, and the rook is lost, for instance 4...Rb8 5.Nc6+ or 4...Rd6 5.Nb7+.

We have a few pending matters:

Question 2.1: How will white win after the straight-forward 1.Re5 Rxe5 2.d7 Rd5 3.b7 Rxd7 4.b8=Q Rd6+ followed by checks in the d-file?

Question 2.2: In which variation(s) is it important that there is a white pawn on b2, that is white can't win without it?

The first is easy - main line is drawn without b2 pawn after 4...Rb5 5.axb5 Kxb5 (followed by a6-a5-a4)
The second is trickier. The solution looks obvious, but I spent quite some time working it out:
5.Kg5 Rd5+ 6.Kf4 Rd4+ 7.Kf5! Rd5+ 8.Qe5!! and the pawn ending is winning (thanks again to b2 pawn as black can draw with very precise play without it)

Jesper Norgaard
17-02-2011, 05:25 PM
Thanks for the solutions, Igor. I came to the same conclusions as you, and I'll give you a 10 out of 10 for finding *both* reasons why b2 pawn is necessary. The pawn ending precise play you mention is just 8...Rxe5+ 9.Kxe5 Kb6 10.Kd5 Ka5 11.Kc4 Kb6 12.Kxb4 a5+ 13.Kc4 Kc6 and without a pawn on b2, this is in fact a draw, while with b2-pawn 14.b4 axb4 15.Kxb4 is a trivial win with 2 connected pawns.

I saw a third reason, but it wasn't valid in the end: 10...a5 11.Kd6 Kb7 12.Kc5 Kc7 13.Kb5 Kd6 14.Kxa5 Kc5 15.Ka6 Kd4 16.a5 Kc3 17.Kb5 Kxb3 18.a6 Kc3 (necessary, if 18...Ka3? follows 20.a8=Q+, and if 18...Kc2? follows 19.Kxb4) 19.a7 b3 20.a8=Q b2 and since this is a b-pawn and not an a-pawn or a c-pawn it is always a trivial win (even with the white king far away) and here even easier because 21.Qe4! stops all resistance.

Jadoubovic' advice in blitz is to grab Kc3 and b3 in one hand and place them down with king on b2 and pawn on c2 - now it is a theoretical draw! You should utter a polite j'adoube of course. If he makes a move, the illegal "move" is now valid. I would never do this myself, of course. :whistle:

Psssstt! Just don't tell Kaitlin in normal text, I don't think she will see us when we are talking in "white text" :D