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Kevin Bonham
30-05-2009, 01:52 AM
I saw some commentary by firegoat7 in the Toolbox today that criticises the way that you are allowed to move before you have written down your opponent's move and suggests that this was previously not allowed, and suggests that:


The introduction of digital clocks with incremental time controls allowed this rule change to slip under the radar.

As far as I can establish this change actually came in in the 1997 Laws in which the following from the 1993 version:


11.1 In the course of play, each player is required to record the game (his own moves and those of his opponent), move after move, as clearly and legibly as possible in the Algebraic Notation, on the scoresheet prescribed for the competition. It is irrelevant whether the player first makes his move and then records it, or vice versa.
[The use of Descriptive Notation or foreign versions of Algebraic Notation is tolerated in internal tournaments, e.g. weekend congresses.]

became:


8.1. In the course of play each player is required to record his own moves and those of his opponent, move after move, as clearly and legibly as possible, in the algebraic notation (Appendix E), on the scoresheet prescribed for the competition.

A player may reply to his opponent's move before recording it, if he so wishes. He must record his previous move before making another. The offer of a draw must be recorded on the scoresheet by both players.(Appendix E.12) If a player due to physical or religious reasons, is unable to keep score, an amount of time, decided by the arbiter, shall be deducted from his allotted time at the beginning of the game.

Now, it is true that this change came in in the same version of the Laws in which increments came in, but I am not sure whether those changes actually have anything to do with each other. Anyway I have noted the above for interest and also added a poll to see what people here think of the issue.

Denis_Jessop
30-05-2009, 10:41 PM
As far as I know the introduction of incremental time controls had nothing to do with it. There seems to be no logical connection between the two which may be why FG7 made the connection. :D

DJ

Bill Gletsos
30-05-2009, 11:09 PM
Back prior to 1985 the FIDE Rules Commission used to published FIDE Interpretations as part of the Laws of Chess.

The Article in the Laws prior to 1985 was Article 13.1



13.1 In the course of play each player is required to record the game (his own moves and those of his opponent), move after move, as clearly and legibly as possible, on the scoresheet prescribed for the competition.

In FIDE Interpretation to Article 13.1 of 1970 in response to the question:

A player, referring to the Laws of Chess, asked his opponent to make his move first and only then write it down on his scoresheet. It is thought not to be correct to write down the move first and only then to make the move on the board. The arbiter of the tournament in question judged the case to be insignificant.

The answer was:

The Commission is of the opinion that every player who has the move has the choice.

In FIDE Interpretation to Article 13.1 of 1973 in response to the question:

Is it a breach of Article 13.1 of the Lws of Chess if the moves are not recorded separately, but in pairs (White and Black together), if the player concerned is not in time trouble?

The answer was:

Technically speaking, this is indeed a breach of Article 13.1. However, the arbiter should intervene only when the arrears in scorekeeping are more than one move for White and one move for Black.

Denis_Jessop
31-05-2009, 04:18 PM
I note that the Tool has added his own special brand of wisdom to the thread over there by claiming that the present rule forces players to make their move before writing down their opponent's. With experts like this who needs arbiters :wall:

DJ